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Job prospects in computer science


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#1 Big Pine

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Posted 23 September 2008 - 07:05 PM


Hi everyone! I'm a second-year college student who happened to come across this site while randomly surfing the web. After a quick glance at this site, I will say that immortality is a nice goal to have and will happen eventually (provided we don't get destroyed by a nuclear war or a giant asteroid), but it's a long way off and won't happen in my generation's lifetime.

I also noticed that there's quite a lot of attention paid to computer science here. This is particularly relevant for me because I'm deciding whether or not to major in computer science (my major is listed as "undeclared engineering" right now). I'm a bit interested in computers, but my main worry is that I won't be able to find a stable job with a decent salary because of all the talk about offshore outsourcing and bringing in foreign workers to America who are willing to work for low wages. I'm a slightly above-average student going to a good but not elite university, and I've heard that foreign competition and outsourcing makes it impossible for anyone besides the best of the best to get a good job here. Does anyone know whether this is true? The only people who have denied this and are claiming of a "skills shortage" in tech are heads of academic departments and CEOs/CIOs. Academic departments want more computer science majors, and CEOs use the shortage claim to lobby for an increase in the number of H1B visas granted, so asking those people is like asking a military recruiter whether or not to enlist.

Other stories I've heard are stories of computer scientists in their early 40s who got laid off because their salaries got too high. They are replaced with newer workers, and older people who are very experienced are considered overqualified and have a very hard time finding jobs.

On another note, the other major I've been considering is civil engineering and then possibly getting an MBA after a few years of work experience. The pay is slightly lower than other engineering disciplines, but it's a lot more immune to outsourcing than computer science is. Also, my interest in civil engineering and computer science is roughly the same.

#2 sentinel

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Posted 23 September 2008 - 08:13 PM

don't panic. Out sourcing is happening but there is always a demand for strong computer scientists that are both technically proficient but are also effective communicators and problem solvers. Outsourcing is often a very closely managed operation where people are very capable within their assigned and defined area but do not necessarily have the view of or involvemnet in the big picture. Full lifecycle people who inderstand the whole system/application are important in any organistation. The important factor is where you have a passion for. You can't just choose a profession that is safe as you will only excel and make yourself valuable when you really throw yourself into it. I run an IT recruitment firm and the constant factor that has made people stand out is demonstrable enthusiasm ie not just saying "I think Grid computing and HPC is great" but being able to back it up with stuff you have done or read in you spare time.

Techwise: C++ more scarce than ever as more universities teach java and C#,but C++ is always the benchmak that is in demand for high speed coding. Grids and HPC are flavour of the year if you are on the development or architecture side, be that on linux farms or windows clusters.

Bottom line, there is always a need for good people, otherwise my job would be easy.

#3 Brafarality

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Posted 17 October 2008 - 09:16 PM

sentinel,

Any challenges out there?
Complex problems that need to be solved? High-end knowledge issues?

Not looking for a job, just a task!

Me bored.
Sudoku, GREs, LSATs, BrainChallenge, blogging, verse, art, music, etc...all the puzzles, tests and creatives that once fulfilled seem distant at the moment.

A good computer science/programming challenge would do it and could possibly congeal all the general and quasi-exact CS knowledge I acquired over the eons, and would also put to the test whether I am the savant I deludedly claim to be based on crummy standardized test and puzzle solving abilities.

Any suggestions?

Thanks much. ;)

Paul

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#4 Cyberbrain

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Posted 17 October 2008 - 11:25 PM

Welcome to Imminst Big Pine!

I too am a second year college student. I'm currently majoring in computer engineering. Civil engineering is a great choice with good job security, but I would advice not to completely abandon programing. A good idea would be to also minor in either business or economics so as to provide a solid foundation for when you go into the jobs market. Getting a class in globalization or supply chain management might also help in understanding outsourcing and out shoring better so you'll know what to expect when a company decides to outsource. Also get to know your professors better and talk to them about what companies look for, trust me professors know best.

#5 JackChristopher

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Posted 03 November 2009 - 05:17 PM

but my main worry is that I won't be able to find a stable job with a decent salary because of all the talk about offshore outsourcing and bringing in foreign workers to America who are willing to work for low wages.


Warning: The Earth explodes if you don't pick CS.
No seriously, as long as we automate things with computers, we'll need programmers. Unless the world starts to hate automation—which is like hating laziness—I don't see us stopping that. In fact, civil engineering itself could be done by nanobots designed by computer scientists eventually.

Other stories I've heard are stories of computer scientists in their early 40s who got laid off because their salaries got too high. They are replaced with newer workers, and older people who are very experienced are considered overqualified and have a very hard time finding jobs.


Outsourcing is a trend. The wages overseas will catch up baring catastrophe. And firing older workers merely because of pay, is bad practice. The people doing that are measuring the value of people the wrong way. If that's a trend, it's a terrible one.

On another note, the other major I've been considering is civil engineering and then possibly getting an MBA after a few years of work experience. The pay is slightly lower than other engineering disciplines, but it's a lot more immune to outsourcing than computer science is. Also, my interest in civil engineering and computer science is roughly the same.


The most important thing to ask yourself is, would you actually like doing this stuff? Don't feel that your major defines you. As you change, and as the universe around you changes, it's a bad idea to stick to doing one thing.

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#6 Anderson01

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Posted 26 May 2010 - 11:03 AM

There are lots of job in Computer Science field and all of them are offering good salary range. A bachelor’s degree in computer science is probably the best route, although you may even decide to get a master’s degree if you really want to get a high paying career in one of the more demanding IT fields. If we look career wise then there is bright career in Applications Architect and Business Intelligence Analyst. For more details and list of computer courses and computer training schools visit - http://www.computerschoolsu.com




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