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Bacopa monnieri: Anyone else using this?


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#31 ajnast4r

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Posted 05 June 2009 - 12:04 AM

Sorry to revive this thread, but I wonder if anyone has tried Mentat by Himalaya, which has Bacopa as the first ingredient. It is the only form I can get here in Costa Rica and I would like to know about dosing it properly for effect.


i take it and like it... its called mindcare in the states. i made a thread on it a while back, do a search.

#32 sdk

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Posted 06 August 2009 - 03:59 AM

I've been taking Bacopa Monierii for around 2 months, initially at night, and then switched to the morning after breakfast.
This is the ONLY nootropic I'm taking - I decided to add components of a proposed stack one at a time to see what effects they had individually. The only other thing I take is SWISSE multivitamins.

In the first two weeks, the Bacopa was amazing, producing a whole range of positive benefits, including increased motivation, increased creativity, and much greater sensitivity to coffee. I had trouble falling asleep as my mind would race with lucid, creative ideas. One night after two cups of coffee during the day, I lay awake until 3am jotting down ideas for a complete program of artistic work. Descriptions of images, techniques, symbolism, allusion, tools and source materials to produce an ongoing body of work. I itemised the techniques I knew, and those I'd need to learn to produce these visions, described specific images, and noted areas in which the method could be expanded. And I'm NOT even a painter. I dabble in street art.

After two months, this initial rush of creativity and motivation has diminished, to be replaced with increased lucidity, and what seems to be more general resilience.

All in all now I feel as if the Bacopa Monierii has created a subtle elevation of both my mood and general clarity, but without any of the initial focus and motivation.

I'm thinking about switching back to night-time doses to see if this brings back the focused motivation.

Edited by sdk, 06 August 2009 - 04:00 AM.

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#33 nito

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Posted 06 August 2009 - 05:25 AM

I've been taking Bacopa Monierii for around 2 months, initially at night, and then switched to the morning after breakfast.
This is the ONLY nootropic I'm taking - I decided to add components of a proposed stack one at a time to see what effects they had individually. The only other thing I take is SWISSE multivitamins.

In the first two weeks, the Bacopa was amazing, producing a whole range of positive benefits, including increased motivation, increased creativity, and much greater sensitivity to coffee. I had trouble falling asleep as my mind would race with lucid, creative ideas. One night after two cups of coffee during the day, I lay awake until 3am jotting down ideas for a complete program of artistic work. Descriptions of images, techniques, symbolism, allusion, tools and source materials to produce an ongoing body of work. I itemised the techniques I knew, and those I'd need to learn to produce these visions, described specific images, and noted areas in which the method could be expanded. And I'm NOT even a painter. I dabble in street art.

After two months, this initial rush of creativity and motivation has diminished, to be replaced with increased lucidity, and what seems to be more general resilience.

All in all now I feel as if the Bacopa Monierii has created a subtle elevation of both my mood and general clarity, but without any of the initial focus and motivation.

I'm thinking about switching back to night-time doses to see if this brings back the focused motivation.



which brand do you take and at what dose?

#34 jCole

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Posted 26 August 2009 - 05:37 PM

I started using this about three weeks ago after I noticed just about everyone on here, uses it in their daily regimen.

All I can say, is this supplement is nothing short of amazing. I started taking it right before bed every night. (started with the 20%, now using 50% from AOR)


I often have had problems with restless sleep and I haven't remember a single dream in years... (yes years) but after taking Bacopa, not only do I remember my dreams, but lucidity is off the chart. I can't say for sure the effect on memory recall yet, but my sleep is noticeably much better every night, which has definitely translated into being more productive during the dayt I've noticed.

Bacopa gets a A+++ in my book. Thanks for giving me back my dreams. :)
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#35 Legis

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Posted 27 August 2009 - 03:14 PM

Interesting new article about bacopa:

Upregulation of 5-HT(2C) receptors in hippocampus of pilocarpine-induced epileptic rats: Antagonism by Bacopa monnieri

"Emotional disturbances, depressive mood, anxiety, aggressive behavior, and memory impairment are the common psychiatric features associated with temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE). The present study was carried out to investigate the role of Bacopa monnieri extract in hippocampus of pilocarpine-induced temporal lobe epileptic rats through the 5-HT(2C) receptor in relation to depression. Our results showed upregulation of 5-HT(2C) receptors with a decreased affinity in hippocampus of pilocarpine-induced epileptic rats. Also, there was an increase in 5-HT(2C) gene expression and inositol triphosphate content in epileptic hippocampus. Carbamazepine and B. monnieri treatments reversed the alterations in 5-HT(2C) receptor binding, gene expression, and inositol triphosphate content in treated epileptic rats as compared to untreated epileptic rats. The forced swim test confirmed the depressive behavior pattern during epilepsy that was nearly completely reversed by B. monnieri treatment."


Edited by Legis, 27 August 2009 - 03:16 PM.


#36 NG_F

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Posted 27 August 2009 - 10:05 PM

which brand do you take and at what dose?


What about the Bacopa extract from Planetary Herbals,approved my Michael Tierra? It is 225mg tabs at 20% bacosides A&B.

Is this a good brand compared to the AOR?I'm aware that the AOR is standardized at 50% instead.

Thanks in advance :)

#37 nootrope

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Posted 28 August 2009 - 03:05 AM

Legis, that's fascinating. I was diagnosed with possible temporal lobe epilepsy in 2004. In early 2008, after having read about Bacopa on this forum, I started taking it. About one year later, I had an EEG and the possible abnormalities that showed up in my 2004 EEG were absent...

Anecdotal evidence for the win!

Interesting new article about bacopa:

Upregulation of 5-HT(2C) receptors in hippocampus of pilocarpine-induced epileptic rats: Antagonism by Bacopa monnieri

"Emotional disturbances, depressive mood, anxiety, aggressive behavior, and memory impairment are the common psychiatric features associated with temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE). The present study was carried out to investigate the role of Bacopa monnieri extract in hippocampus of pilocarpine-induced temporal lobe epileptic rats through the 5-HT(2C) receptor in relation to depression. Our results showed upregulation of 5-HT(2C) receptors with a decreased affinity in hippocampus of pilocarpine-induced epileptic rats. Also, there was an increase in 5-HT(2C) gene expression and inositol triphosphate content in epileptic hippocampus. Carbamazepine and B. monnieri treatments reversed the alterations in 5-HT(2C) receptor binding, gene expression, and inositol triphosphate content in treated epileptic rats as compared to untreated epileptic rats. The forced swim test confirmed the depressive behavior pattern during epilepsy that was nearly completely reversed by B. monnieri treatment."



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#38 Yushua

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Posted 21 September 2009 - 09:12 PM

so, which one is the best bacopa supplement.
i read somewhere that these bacoside B is the actual stuff thats good for you (maybe A and B), which product contains most of these?

#39 Vultures

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Posted 21 September 2009 - 09:39 PM

so, which one is the best bacopa supplement.
i read somewhere that these bacoside B is the actual stuff thats good for you (maybe A and B), which product contains most of these?

I take Bacopa Enlighten from AOL. For two weeks I think, no noticable results yet.

#40 mentatpsi

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Posted 22 September 2009 - 12:11 AM

so, which one is the best bacopa supplement.
i read somewhere that these bacoside B is the actual stuff thats good for you (maybe A and B), which product contains most of these?


Just bare in mind that the effects you might get are different based on dosage. The idea that more is better for you is usually false... most nootropics have a bell curve.
I myself use planetary herbals. Standardized to 20% A&B.

Edited by mentatpsi, 22 September 2009 - 12:11 AM.


#41 mentatpsi

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Posted 22 September 2009 - 12:14 AM

An interesting find:

Bacopa monniera, Linn. (Brahmi: Scrophulariaceae) an Ayurvedic medicine is clinically used for memory enhancing, epilepsy, insomnia and as mild sedative. For the first time the effect of alcohol and hexane fraction of Brahmi has been studied on FeSO4 and cumene hydroperoxide induced lipid peroxidation. Alcohol fraction showed greater protection with both inducers. Results were compared with known antioxidants tris, EDTA and a natural-antioxidant vitamin E. The effect of Brahmi was also examined on hepatic glutathione content. The mechanism of action could be through metal chelation at the initiation level and also as chain breaker. The results suggested that Brahmi is a potent antioxidant. The response of Brahmi was dose dependent. Tris, an hydroxyl trapper did not show any protection in comparison to Brahmi where as EDTA and vitamin E did protect against FeSO4. In experimental conditions 100 micrograms Brahmi extract (alcoholic) was equivalent to 247 micrograms of EDTA (0.66 microM) and 58 micrograms of vitamin E. Interestingly Brahmi only slightly protected the autooxidation and FeSO4 induced oxidation of reduced glutathione on lower doses 100 micrograms/ml and below, but on higher concentrations it enhanced the rate of oxidation.

http://grande.nal.us...p;therow=560894

#42 Arc

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Posted 22 September 2009 - 02:51 AM

I also noticed two recent interesting studies on pubmed:

Down-regulation of cerebellar 5-HT(2C) receptors in pilocarpine-induced epilepsy in rats: therapeutic role of Bacopa monnieri extract.
Krishnakumar A, Abraham PM, Paul J, Paulose CS.

Molecular Neurobiology and Cell Biology Unit, Centre for Neuroscience, Department of Biotechnology, Cochin University of Science and Technology, Cochin-682 022, Kerala, India.

Epilepsy is a syndrome of episodic brain dysfunction characterized by recurrent unpredictable, spontaneous seizures. Cerebellar dysfunction is a recognized complication of temporal lobe epilepsy and it is associated with seizure generation, motor deficits and memory impairment. Serotonin is known to exert a modulatory action on cerebellar function through 5HT(2C) receptors. 5-HT(2C) receptors are novel targets for developing anti-convulsant drugs. In the present study, we investigated the changes in the 5-HT(2C) receptors binding and gene expression in the cerebellum of control, epileptic and Bacopa monnieri treated epileptic rats. There was a significant down regulation of the 5-HT content (p<0.001), 5-HT(2C) gene expression (p<0.001) and 5-HT(2C) receptor binding (p<0.001) with an increased affinity (p<0.001). Carbamazepine and B. monnieri treatments to epileptic rats reversed the down regulated 5-HT content (p<0.01), 5-HT(2C) receptor binding (p<0.001) and gene expression (p<0.01) to near control level. Also, the Rotarod test confirms the motor dysfunction and recovery by B. monnieri treatment. These data suggest the neuroprotective role of B. monnieri through the upregulation of 5-HT(2C) receptor in epileptic rats. This has clinical significance in the management of epilepsy.

PMID: 19439326 [PubMed - in process]


Upregulation of 5-HT(2C) receptors in hippocampus of pilocarpine-induced epileptic rats: Antagonism by Bacopa monnieri.
Krishnakumar A, Nandhu MS, Paulose CS.

Molecular Neurobiology and Cell Biology Unit, Centre for Neuroscience, Department of Biotechnology, Cochin University of Science and Technology, Cochin 682022, Kerala, India.

Emotional disturbances, depressive mood, anxiety, aggressive behavior, and memory impairment are the common psychiatric features associated with temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE). The present study was carried out to investigate the role of Bacopa monnieri extract in hippocampus of pilocarpine-induced temporal lobe epileptic rats through the 5-HT(2C) receptor in relation to depression. Our results showed upregulation of 5-HT(2C) receptors with a decreased affinity in hippocampus of pilocarpine-induced epileptic rats. Also, there was an increase in 5-HT(2C) gene expression and inositol triphosphate content in epileptic hippocampus. Carbamazepine and B. monnieri treatments reversed the alterations in 5-HT(2C) receptor binding, gene expression, and inositol triphosphate content in treated epileptic rats as compared to untreated epileptic rats. The forced swim test confirmed the depressive behavior pattern during epilepsy that was nearly completely reversed by B. monnieri treatment.

PMID: 19700373 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]


Obviously how this translates to humans is unknown, but it does lend credence to the idea that bacopa helps normalizes your serotonin receptors.

#43 mentatpsi

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Posted 24 September 2009 - 09:19 AM

Source: Effect of Bacopa monniera on stress induced changes in plasma corticosterone and brain monoamines in rats

Bacopa monniera (BM) is well known for its neuropharmacological effects. Our previous studies indicated the adaptogenic effect of standardized extract of BM in various stress models. In the present study, effect of BM was evaluated on acute stress (AS) and chronic unpredictable stress (CUS) induced changes in plasma corticosterone and monoamines-noradrenaline (NA), dopamine (DA) and serotonin (5-HT) in cortex and hippocampus regions of brain in rats. Panax root powder (Panax quinquefolium) was taken as standard. Subjecting animals to AS (immobilization for 150 min once only) and CUS (different stressors for 7 days) resulted in significant elevation in plasma corticosterone levels, which was significantly countered by treatment with BM at a dose of 40 and 80 mg/kg p.o. similar to the effects of Panax quinquefolium (PQ) at 100 mg/kg p.o. AS exposure significantly increased the levels of 5-HT and decreased NA content in both the brain regions while DA content was significantly increased in cortex and decreased in hippocampus regions. In CUS regimen, levels of NA, DA and 5-HT were significantly depleted in cortex and hippocampus regions of brain. Treatment with BM (40 and 80 mg/kg) attenuated the stress induced changes in levels of 5-HT and DA in cortex and hippocampus regions but was ineffective in normalizing the NA levels in AS model, whereas PQ treatment significantly reverted back the effects of stress. In CUS model, pretreatment with BM and PQ significantly elevated the levels of NA, DA and 5-HT levels in cortex and levels of NA and 5-HT in hippocampus regions. Hence, our study indicates that the adaptogenic activity of BM might be due to the normalization of stress induced alteration in plasma corticosterone and levels of monoamines like NA, 5-HT and DA in cortex and hippocampus regions of the brain, which are more vulnerable to stressful conditions analogous to the effects of PQ.



#44 Stan100

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Posted 28 September 2009 - 07:39 PM

I wanted to bump this and also add my own experience: I've had my bottle (first) for a couple weeks now and it's great. It acts as an anxiety reducer as well as a nootropic. I started off taking two at night before bed, like someone else on here recommended. It was too much for me; I slept better but I felt slow in the day and wasn't sure if I was using it to its best. I also want to note that I don't have any abnormal level of anxiety, but it's a significant reducer anyway. I'm a college student, if it helps any of my academic-brethren make a decision.

I stopped for a couple days and now I take one in the morning with breakfast and it's fine. I feel a little bit more "relaxed" during the day, but it's not a serious issue. If anything, the coffee brings me back up to speed. I think the move here might be to cycle off on the weekends, mostly because I feel like the extra energy comes in handy. My bottle is measured at 225mg per tablet and I think I went with the 20% choice (I can check when I'm home). I've actually been playing with only taking the bacopa in the morning along my choline source (Alpha-GPC currently, back to CDP after the bottle is done). It seems weird since I'm not taking Piracetam (or any other interesting sounding nootropics), but with bacopa I've had astounding clarity throughout the day.

I'm going to possibly play around with one tablet before bed and one in the morning, and I'll let everyone know if it's better.

Edited by Stan100, 28 September 2009 - 07:41 PM.


#45 aventinus

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Posted 21 January 2010 - 03:40 AM

I take those two, with ALCAR. I think aside from the omega 3s that those three are the most effective supplements by far.

have you ever mixed st. johns wort with bacopa? i was wondering about the outcome of that mixture....

#46 Johann

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Posted 09 February 2010 - 09:11 PM

I got my bacopa from herbalcom.com about a week and a half ago. It is a loose powder.

The first time I tried it, my test scores at lumosity.com (brain games) went thru the roof. But since that first time, I have not had the same success.

It does feel like I am getting a boost, but can't seem to repeat that first experience. I take half a teaspoon a day. This morning I took a whole teaspoon. Nasty tasting .. like dirt.

#47 nito

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Posted 09 February 2010 - 09:14 PM

I got my bacopa from herbalcom.com about a week and a half ago. It is a loose powder.

The first time I tried it, my test scores at lumosity.com (brain games) went thru the roof. But since that first time, I have not had the same success.

It does feel like I am getting a boost, but can't seem to repeat that first experience. I take half a teaspoon a day. This morning I took a whole teaspoon. Nasty tasting .. like dirt.



Bacopa's so damn foul tasting it's crazy! Hey do you get the anti-anxiety effects from it too?

#48 Johann

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Posted 09 February 2010 - 10:52 PM

Yes, I notice something subtle in the realm of anti-anxiety. It is not like being on valium but mellow enough to make it a must for that particular matter.

#49 425runner

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Posted 10 February 2010 - 01:01 AM

I've had the powdered Bacopa from BAC and it gave me a horrible heartburn! I have GERD issues already so I had to stop taking it. I might try capsules someday...but the effects were very subtle, almost none existent, I'm sure it's good to use it daily but it just isn't noticeable enough to add it to my daily noot stack.

#50 Johann

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Posted 10 February 2010 - 01:04 PM

Yesterday evening I tried something different. I made a tea out of the bacopa. Put it into a small pot with about 3 ounces of water, let it come to a boil, then steeped for five minutes. After it cooled for a few minutes I sweetened it with sweet 'n low and it didn't
taste bad at all. And I had taken some Taurine earlier (which stimulate the GABA receptors) and for the rest of the night I was noticeably mellowed out. It even affected my sleep for the better. I got seven hours of sleep but it feels like I got nine.

Edited by Johann, 10 February 2010 - 01:05 PM.


#51 viltro

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Posted 11 February 2010 - 12:45 AM

Yesterday evening I tried something different. I made a tea out of the bacopa. Put it into a small pot with about 3 ounces of water, let it come to a boil, then steeped for five minutes. After it cooled for a few minutes I sweetened it with sweet 'n low and it didn't
taste bad at all. And I had taken some Taurine earlier (which stimulate the GABA receptors) and for the rest of the night I was noticeably mellowed out. It even affected my sleep for the better. I got seven hours of sleep but it feels like I got nine.



Nice idea! I tried this earlier today after reading your post and it made me extremely relaxed, bordering on sleepy. I used cinnamon; it remained fairly bitter though drinkable. I'll definitely use this method in future when I want to wind down.

#52 chrono

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Posted 12 February 2010 - 07:35 PM

I've been trying to get going with bacopa for about 3 weeks now with a bottle of Himalaya 66.5mg bacosides A&B. I've tried taking 1-2 pills shortly before bed, and every morning I wake up feeling bleary and groggy, so I tend to sleep in an extra hour or two.

Once I've dragged myself out of bed, that almost-benzo calming feeling is pretty nice, but I'm not sure it's what I need in the morning. Maybe I'll try taking it earlier in the afternoon to see how tired it makes me later in the day, and if this carries over to the next day.

Most of the positive responses seem to be focused on anxiolytic effects. Has anyone noticed enhanced memory? Apparently this can take many months to begin.

EDIT: Just found the thread Bacopa and Fatigue. Some kind of serotonin deficiency is postulated.

Edited by chrono, 12 February 2010 - 08:30 PM.


#53 mentatpsi

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Posted 14 November 2010 - 10:05 PM

I would like to make note that:

Wikipedia - Bacopa
Phytoremediation
Bacopa monnieri is a known hyperaccumulator of Cadmium, Chromium, Lead and Mercury, and as such can be used for phytoremediation.[17][18]


As such, I have always wondered if the peculiar sweetness that bacopa sometimes exhibits is not a result of lead. I read that in earlier eras, lead was used illegally to sweeten wines.

I have bought a USDA organic GMP Bacopa [the same one as chrono] and the scent contains no sweetness, purely herbal and earth like in nature. Secondly, with all the other contaminants, it seems that buying Bacopa is a bit of a risk assessment since it is a known fact that the supplement industry is highly unregulated. Aside from the particular company I buy from [which is only the first time i've purchased from], I have noted flucations of the scent from one batch to the next. I had tested the flavor of the non-organic one, and it produced a bit of foulness. I can state that if we're true in our pursuits of anti-aging, we should be educated with our purchase of this particular herb and stick with certified organic and research the environment with which the bacopa is grown in. Just thought I'd put my two cents out there.

Edited by mentatpsi, 14 November 2010 - 10:06 PM.


#54 recitative

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Posted 14 November 2010 - 10:36 PM

From Emile (1762) by Jean Jacques Rousseau:

"The adulteration of green or bitter wines is done with litharge. Litharge is a lead preparation. Lead combined with acids makes a very mild salt which corrects the greenness of wine to the taste but is poison to those who drink it."

#55 Delta Gamma

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Posted 15 November 2010 - 01:46 AM

I've been using a Bacopa monnieri containing product for about a month now, and I must say I'm impressed. The product I'm using is "Swiss Natural Sources Solutions Memory", which contains ginkgo, ginseng, and Bacomind (a patented extract). Having tried both gingko and ginseng before this product, I can say its mostly the Bacopa or some sort of synergy between the extracts. I find that when I take the recommended two doses a day I get a calm stimulation which lasts for hours and a gentle body buzzing feeling.

However, I have found that it ridiculously potentates any stimulant I take. Anyone notice this as well? I can usually have a large cup of tea and feel nothing from it, but if I drink it after taking this supplement that it becomes incredibly stimulating. I've done a little research using my university's journal access program, and found out that at least ginkgo inhibits CYP1A2, which would partially explain the potentiation of caffeine (though it could be any number of pathways).

Thoughts?

#56 aLurker

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Posted 15 November 2010 - 08:57 AM

I've been using a Bacopa monnieri containing product for about a month now, and I must say I'm impressed. The product I'm using is "Swiss Natural Sources Solutions Memory", which contains ginkgo, ginseng, and Bacomind (a patented extract). Having tried both gingko and ginseng before this product, I can say its mostly the Bacopa or some sort of synergy between the extracts. I find that when I take the recommended two doses a day I get a calm stimulation which lasts for hours and a gentle body buzzing feeling.

However, I have found that it ridiculously potentates any stimulant I take. Anyone notice this as well? I can usually have a large cup of tea and feel nothing from it, but if I drink it after taking this supplement that it becomes incredibly stimulating. I've done a little research using my university's journal access program, and found out that at least ginkgo inhibits CYP1A2, which would partially explain the potentiation of caffeine (though it could be any number of pathways).

Thoughts?


Thanks for sharing your experience.
I did a post about BacoMind here in another thread.
I get really tired by bacopa after awhile. As I explained in the post I linked to BacoMind seems to have a different composition of bacosides than the standardized extract used in other products so perhaps the side effect profile is somewhat different too. I suppose you haven't tried any other bacopa products but do you feel any tiredness or fatigue from this product and how much bacopa/bacosides does it acutally contain per pill?

#57 Delta Gamma

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Posted 16 November 2010 - 03:51 AM

Unfortunately it only says it contains 100mg of Bacomind per pill, which given the recommended two pills per day comes to 200mg per day.
Though some further research on my part suggests that if there are any fatigue inducing properties that the Canadian ginseng and ginkgo extracts (5% ginsenosides 100mg a pill, and 24% flavoglycosides/ 6% terpene lactones respectively) may help mask them. If I recall correctly ginkgo had some sort of antagonistic effect on GABA receptors, and ginseng has some sort of vague fatigue reducing properties. It doesn't make me tired per say, but I find that it when I relax I feel much more tired than I would otherwise until I get back to work.

I'm more wondering about the potentiation of stimulants it provides, it makes me a little uneasy about possible drug interactions. Though with my previous experiences with ginkgo and ginseng (at similar dosages and extract strengths), there is definitely something that Bacomind either does independently or through some sort of synergy.

#58 aLurker

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Posted 16 November 2010 - 10:19 AM

Unfortunately it only says it contains 100mg of Bacomind per pill, which given the recommended two pills per day comes to 200mg per day.
Though some further research on my part suggests that if there are any fatigue inducing properties that the Canadian ginseng and ginkgo extracts (5% ginsenosides 100mg a pill, and 24% flavoglycosides/ 6% terpene lactones respectively) may help mask them. If I recall correctly ginkgo had some sort of antagonistic effect on GABA receptors, and ginseng has some sort of vague fatigue reducing properties. It doesn't make me tired per say, but I find that it when I relax I feel much more tired than I would otherwise until I get back to work.

I'm more wondering about the potentiation of stimulants it provides, it makes me a little uneasy about possible drug interactions. Though with my previous experiences with ginkgo and ginseng (at similar dosages and extract strengths), there is definitely something that Bacomind either does independently or through some sort of synergy.


A, perhaps unfounded, concern is that mixing a vasodilator like ginkgo with vasoconstricting stims might yield unpredictable results. I think it's been discussed before but I haven't payed much attention. I'd actually prefer a BacoMind product without any vasodilator but that seems hard to find.

And although I guess you already know from the thread I linked to; most studies seem to use higher doses than 200 mg of BacoMind or bacopa extract.

What stims have you tried it with? I think most people here would say that potentation of stims is a good thing unless you're mostly referring to some side effects.

#59 Delta Gamma

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Posted 16 November 2010 - 05:49 PM

Unfortunately it only says it contains 100mg of Bacomind per pill, which given the recommended two pills per day comes to 200mg per day.
Though some further research on my part suggests that if there are any fatigue inducing properties that the Canadian ginseng and ginkgo extracts (5% ginsenosides 100mg a pill, and 24% flavoglycosides/ 6% terpene lactones respectively) may help mask them. If I recall correctly ginkgo had some sort of antagonistic effect on GABA receptors, and ginseng has some sort of vague fatigue reducing properties. It doesn't make me tired per say, but I find that it when I relax I feel much more tired than I would otherwise until I get back to work.

I'm more wondering about the potentiation of stimulants it provides, it makes me a little uneasy about possible drug interactions. Though with my previous experiences with ginkgo and ginseng (at similar dosages and extract strengths), there is definitely something that Bacomind either does independently or through some sort of synergy.


A, perhaps unfounded, concern is that mixing a vasodilator like ginkgo with vasoconstricting stims might yield unpredictable results. I think it's been discussed before but I haven't payed much attention. I'd actually prefer a BacoMind product without any vasodilator but that seems hard to find.

And although I guess you already know from the thread I linked to; most studies seem to use higher doses than 200 mg of BacoMind or bacopa extract.

What stims have you tried it with? I think most people here would say that potentation of stims is a good thing unless you're mostly referring to some side effects.


While the study on adults used 450mg a day, which is over twice my daily dose, there is also a study on the Bacomind website showing that children in special ed. classes benefited significantly from 225mg a day. This is very close to the dose I've been taking daily, with the exception of the fact I take mine with breakfast and after lunch as opposed to 1 dose a day.

The stimulants in question are: nicotine, caffeine, Dexedrine 5mg, and Concerta 18mg. The latter two were scripted to me when I was younger by some doctor who couldn't tell ADHD from hypoglycemia and now are only used to help me study for midterms. I wouldn't say the potentiation is a negative, but it makes me wonder what is causing it as they seem to have rather diverse metabolic pathways. One possibility that jumps to my mind is that the vasodilative effects of ginkgo may lead to higher concentrations in the brain, though somewhat consistent with my experience with ginkgo and caffeine it doesn't explain the extra "oomph" that this combo gives.

So as for your experience with Bacopa was your fatigue more of a general lack of motivation or a feeling of actual fatigue?
Also, out of curiosity what's your master's in? I've been a lurker here for some time now haha.

As a side note, I've only been able to find pure Bacomind extracts in kg bulk quantities, but I'll post the link anyways:
http://www.alibaba.c..._MONNIERI_.html

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#60 mentatpsi

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Posted 18 November 2010 - 09:06 PM

From Emile (1762) by Jean Jacques Rousseau:

"The adulteration of green or bitter wines is done with litharge. Litharge is a lead preparation. Lead combined with acids makes a very mild salt which corrects the greenness of wine to the taste but is poison to those who drink it."


Sorry for the foolishness in my following comment, but I'm a bit confused as to the interpretation of your quote; the use of Litharge was the causation to the bitter wines, or that which reduced the bitterness. The word adulteration to me means to corrupt the essence, and as such if bitter wine's essence is bitter, than that quote would mean to corrupt its essence to sweetness. However, the combination of acids states the creation of a mild salt so perhaps my interpration is incorrect.

Edited by mentatpsi, 18 November 2010 - 09:12 PM.





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