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Teeth Whitening?


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#1 2tender

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Posted 07 January 2009 - 01:09 AM


Is there a down side? Is it safe?

#2 lunarsolarpower

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Posted 07 January 2009 - 02:30 AM

Is there a down side? Is it safe?


If you're referring to professional whitening the most likely downside is temporary sensitivity immediately after having used the product for several days. It goes away in a day or two and the teeth do fine. Bleaching is becoming increasingly popular similar to how more people use contacts and are undergoing LASIK than in the past.

#3 2tender

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Posted 24 January 2009 - 01:31 AM

Thanks for posting that, I appreciate your input.

Edited by 2tender, 24 January 2009 - 01:33 AM.


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#4 Barksdale

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Posted 24 March 2009 - 07:34 PM

Are there any supplement that makes the teeth wither?=D

#5 Barksdale

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Posted 08 April 2009 - 04:11 PM

Are there any supplement that makes the teeth wither?=D


Anyone?


Anyway, I've been researching what products that might be beneficial for whitening and I found a lot of stuff.

ZOOM is probably the best thing to do, if you want long lasting results, but I'm not sure if my dentist can do it..
It's also important to use a tooth brush that has a whitening effect, such as Crest Whitening toothpaste.
Crest witestripes is also probably going to work (just ordered 14 stripes of this)
Other than that a lot of people says that using baking soda when brushing your teeth helps a lot.

#6 caston

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Posted 08 April 2009 - 04:38 PM

What about treating the bacteria that is yellowing your teeth rather than just bleaching the teeth?

#7 FunkOdyssey

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Posted 08 April 2009 - 04:46 PM

The teeth are also stained by food, drinks, tea, coffee, smoking, etc.

If anyone in the northeast US wants to get a ZOOM bleaching I could help arrange that at a massive discount over the usual rate.

Edited by FunkOdyssey, 08 April 2009 - 04:47 PM.


#8 krillin

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Posted 10 April 2009 - 03:49 PM

I suggest considering only optical methods (like Zoom or lasers) or a Sonicare toothbrush. Search http://askdrellie.blogspot.com/ for the risks of whitening toothpastes, rinses, and strips. Use Crest Original toothpaste. Other toothpastes are either too abrasive or not abrasive enough, or have triclosan which can cause mouth sores by forming chloroform. The whitening strips damage enamel which increases the rate of staining, so you get hooked on them. Peroxide rinses cause sores (personal experience here) and cancer.

#9 Guacamolium

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Posted 20 April 2009 - 06:32 AM

Before brushing your teeth, take a swig of hydrogen peroxide and let it swish around your mouth gently for 30seconds or so, then add a good mouthwash. Spit out and brush your teeth. If done consistently for a few days, you should notice considerable whitening. If after regular use for a few weeks, this doesn't satisfy how white your teeth need to be, then ZOOM or another dentist method will take you the rest of the way.

#10 JLL

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Posted 20 April 2009 - 06:40 AM

Before brushing your teeth, take a swig of hydrogen peroxide and let it swish around your mouth gently for 30seconds or so, then add a good mouthwash. Spit out and brush your teeth. If done consistently for a few days, you should notice considerable whitening. If after regular use for a few weeks, this doesn't satisfy how white your teeth need to be, then ZOOM or another dentist method will take you the rest of the way.


Would hydrogen peroxide or baking soda (or other similar home remedies) damage the enamel? I've googled around for answers, but haven't seen much conclusive evidence either way.

#11 lunarsolarpower

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Posted 20 April 2009 - 06:55 AM

Would hydrogen peroxide or baking soda (or other similar home remedies) damage the enamel? I've googled around for answers, but haven't seen much conclusive evidence either way.


I don't think baking soda by itself would be harmful. However if you used it while brushing it is pretty abrasive and could cause wear patterns like this:

Posted Image

As for hydrogen peroxide - I don't think it would harm the teeth but it probably wouldn't be good for the soft tissues of the mouth.

#12 supernoober

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Posted 02 July 2009 - 05:22 AM

BUMP. I'm trying to get my teeth whitened. What should I do that doesn't damage my teeth?

Also wtf about ZOOM? I read people got blisters/lip cancer and damaged gums and stuff???? Serious?

Edited by supernoober, 02 July 2009 - 05:22 AM.


#13 .fonclea.

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Posted 02 July 2009 - 07:52 PM

What about treating the bacteria that is yellowing your teeth rather than just bleaching the teeth?


True. personnaly i also brush my tongue but what can we do else ? Except eating dairy products, as a supplement there is also the fluor.

#14 lunarsolarpower

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Posted 08 July 2009 - 03:24 AM

Ironically enough one of the things that can cause teeth to appear more yellow over time is the practice of toothbrushing. Because the outer enamel layer is more translucent while the inner dentin is more yellow, the teeth can begin to appear more yellow as the enamel wears thinner over many years of brushing with an abrasive containing dentifrice. Often the most aggressive brushers causing the most wear are those least happy with the shade of their teeth. Except for the case of some extrinsic stains you can't brush away yellow teeth. Brushing is to disrupt the maturation process of the biofilm that forms on the teeth. Whitening is a completely different procedure best performed with professional peroxide products. Opalescence Treswhite Supreme provides a less expensive albeit less potent alternative to custom tray professional bleaching. Obviously there are many other solutions out there as well.

#15 supernoober

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Posted 11 July 2009 - 08:32 PM

What's the best toothpaste to use?

#16 treonsverdery

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Posted 19 August 2009 - 04:41 PM

Hydrogen peroxide generates the OH radical
a thing the free radical theory of aging suggests is kind peculiar thing to use immortality wise

I thought that rather than have a dribble of hydrogen peroxide twice a day for 14 days I would try multiple reapplications at a time
after 7 applications of plus white hydrogen peroxide gel during an hour my teeth are whiter not brilliant white though

basically I applied the gel up to 11 minutes per go then rubbed my finger to squeak on my teeth to remove used gel between gel applications I thought if they squeaked there would be fresh gel on the tooth surfaces with each use
I also used some vitamin E as well as C to go with the oral hydrogen peroxide I suggest taking these just prior to teeth whitening plus just after There is research that shows both these antioxidants are dermally absorbed so it might benefit the gums as well as ameliorate the hydrogen peroxide that gets ngested

my gums felt etched n sore but were fine after I slept

the reason I thought about this at all was I watched this video that says people with whiter teeth do rather well I think it is bizarre n kind of humorous that

more likely to be hired (58%) and received larger salary offers (53%)
viewed to be more professional (65%) more outgoing (59%)
a greater interest in continuing their interaction or "date" with more than half of the study participants (54%) after their teeth had been whitened.


According to the three part study, which included simulated job interviews, simulated first dates and a quantitative online survey; more than half of the study participants were more likely to be hired (58%) and received larger salary offers (53%) after their teeth had been whitened. The study also found that evaluators expressed a greater interest in continuing their interaction or "date" with more than half of the study participants (54%) after their teeth had been whitened.

"This study provides some of the first findings that speak to the powerful benefits of having a whiter smile," says Dr. Dacher Keltner, smile psychologist and professor of psychology at the University of California at Berkeley. "Visible from 200 feet, it is the intense focus of what other people look at, and a sign of our warmth, confidence, and health."

During the simulated job interviews, it was also found that a majority of the study participants were viewed to be more professional (65%) and more confident (61%) after their teeth had been whitened. And, on their simulated first dates, more than half of study participants were viewed to be more outgoing (59%) after their teeth had been whitened.


Edited by treonsverdery, 19 August 2009 - 04:58 PM.


#17 2tender

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Posted 17 September 2009 - 03:43 PM

I am the OP. I got custom trays made by my Dentist and used the gel he provided (11 and 16%) after 3 months of using the tray/gel treatment twice daily (20 minutes at a time) for 3 months there was significant improvement. He suggested using it once daily for 20 minutes to provide even further whitening, but I have opted for once to twice weekly applications as I dont want them freakishly, glow in the dark, white. It took longer than expected, and there was some slight gum irritation at times, which was remedied by taking days off of application, but overall Im glad that I did it.

#18 kismet

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Posted 01 November 2009 - 11:18 PM

Does enamel regenerate?  :p As per wikipedia the damage to enamel is only minimal, I can't see how this is a problem (other than possibly accelerating tooth decay in the long term).

The average loss of enamel ranged from 1.2 to 2 nanometers on the treated teeth. The control teeth, on average, actually gained 0.4 nanometers of hardness in comparison over the treatment time frame. The surface ability to bounce back from applied force was reduced by an average of between 6 percent and 18.8 percent among the treated teeth, depending on the type of treatment.
http://researchnews..../homebleach.htm

Edited by kismet, 01 November 2009 - 11:20 PM.


#19 VidX

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Posted 03 November 2009 - 07:15 AM

 I can't see how this is a problem (other than possibly accelerating tooth decay in the long term).





Seems like a problem to me..

#20 kismet

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Posted 03 November 2009 - 10:27 PM

Seems like a problem to me..

Yeah, that's why I'm asking. I don't get tooth biology. I was of the opinion that enamel remineralises naturally, but OTOH I think it is severely diminished in the elderly and a major/minor problem... and I am tooo lazy to dig up more stuff right now.

Edited by kismet, 03 November 2009 - 10:27 PM.


#21 VidX

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Posted 03 November 2009 - 10:35 PM

I have these white crest stripes, but probably I'll give them away for someone as I "feel" it may not be good to "damage" (even if its controlled damage) enamel for a relatively short time effect of whiteness.. My teeth are a lil off white in appearance, but I don't really care as long as they arent brown.

#22 lunarsolarpower

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Posted 04 November 2009 - 04:41 AM

I have these white crest stripes, but probably I'll give them away for someone as I "feel" it may not be good to "damage" (even if its controlled damage) enamel for a relatively short time effect of whiteness.. My teeth are a lil off white in appearance, but I don't really care as long as they arent brown.


I don't know if you have access to the full version of the Azer article but in the summary it states:

It is particularly interesting to note that the use of Whitestrips was found to cause significantly lower enamel demineralization compared to other bleaching products.


I was wondering if they addressed the potential for remineralization by saliva in the mouth. Their answer was:

It was not the scope of this study to consider investigating, on the nanohardness scale, the possible clinical effects of salivary pellicles and fluoride treatments on enamel remineralization after bleaching. The protective effect of salivary pellicles against enamel demineralization remains to be controversial.


However they do state:

Post-bleaching fluoride applications have been extensively evaluated in the literature. It is generally accepted that fluoride treatments, including fluoride-containing toothpastes, increase enamel remineralization following bleaching and restore surface hardness, as well as reverse the enamel decalcification effects to reach pre-bleaching levels


I'm probably as concerned about the longevity of my teeth as one can be and I don't think bleaching with up to 10% carbamide peroxide is likely to cause any long term irreversible problems if you are using fluoride toothpaste as recommended every day.

#23 Saber

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Posted 05 November 2009 - 04:36 AM

Saliva does remineralize enamel but the process is slow, depends greatly on the volume of saliva and mineral content it carries and usually will not be adequate if you subject them to rapid demineralization by eating too much sugar, carbs and acidic food day after day. Even brushing with fluoride toothpaste is not enough if you do these things.

Remineralization technology is on the rise, however. Right now there are four options, and two of them are Recaldent and Novamin, the two most promising.
Search up some studies on Novamin, they do a good job patching up holes in your enamel.
If these holes grow too numerous (which happens to most people as they age unless they do not eat carbs), your teeth will become more and more weaker, and one day when you bite on something hard, they'll snap like a dry cracker, one of the woes of old age.

I've seen it happen to other people and it just breaks my heart. Take care of you teeth because once they're gone, food will no longer taste the same.

A remineralization paste should be more than enough to offset any enamel you lose through bleaching. Though, you may find that using these paste alone will provide a mild whitening effect as the enamel gets patched up with new hydroxylapatite.

Edited by Saber, 05 November 2009 - 04:37 AM.


#24 lunarsolarpower

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Posted 05 November 2009 - 05:06 AM

Remineralization technology is on the rise, however. Right now there are four options, and two of them are Recaldent and Novamin, the two most promising.


Do you consider plain ACP to be one of the four? What would the fourth be?

I assume you don't consider resin infiltration to fit in the same category?

#25 Timote

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Posted 09 February 2010 - 10:19 PM

thought acp and recaldent are the same - so what would the third and the fourth be..?

#26 Skötkonung

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Posted 09 February 2010 - 10:54 PM

Are there any supplement that makes the teeth wither?=D


Anyone?


Anyway, I've been researching what products that might be beneficial for whitening and I found a lot of stuff.

ZOOM is probably the best thing to do, if you want long lasting results, but I'm not sure if my dentist can do it..
It's also important to use a tooth brush that has a whitening effect, such as Crest Whitening toothpaste.
Crest witestripes is also probably going to work (just ordered 14 stripes of this)
Other than that a lot of people says that using baking soda when brushing your teeth helps a lot.

I've had ZOOM whitening done before and it was probably the most painful procedure I have ever experienced. I recommend bleaching trays, as the bleach levels can be more precisely controlled and the bleaching iterations can be spread out.

#27 VegaSinclair

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Posted 01 April 2010 - 04:10 PM

Some of those home teeth whitening kits scare me. They have so many precautions or possible risks associated with them that I'm afraid I'll mess up and damage my teeth or gums. If I got my teeth whitened, I would probably have the dentist do it with Zoom or one of the other dentist treatments. It's also expensive when you think about how long it will last before your teeth become discolored again. I tend to think of teeth whitening the same as bleaching your hair. If you keep bleaching your hair, you'll damage it over time.

#28 Mischelstraus

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Posted 09 April 2010 - 10:11 AM

Hey good question to answer as everyone go through this problem. I read out the replies you got, really they are very helpful.
There are many methods to whiten teeth such as bleaching strips, bleaching pen, bleaching gel, laser bleaching, and natural bleaching. Also you can use some home remedies like whitening is done with bleaching gel which is useful to the teeth using thin guard trays. At-home whitening can also be done by applying small strips that go over the front teeth.
Hope it will help you.

#29 MoodyBlue

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Posted 13 April 2010 - 10:48 PM

Yes, there is a way to remineralize tooth enamel. My dentist's office introduced this to me. It's called GC MI Paste.

Here's a quote from their site:

The MI Paste™ and MI Paste Plus™ Family

MI Paste is the only product for professional use containing the active ingredient RECALDENT™ (CPP-ACP), a special milk-derived phosphopeptide that binds calcium and phosphate to tooth surfaces, plaque and surrounding soft tissue. MI Paste is a water-based, sugar-free créme that is applied directly to the tooth surface or oral cavity. MI Paste with RECALDENT™ (CPP-ACP) restores the oral mineral imbalances that cause demineralization by replacing minerals while improving saliva flow and fluoride uptake as well as soothing sensitive surfaces - making it an ideal treatment for:

•Reversing tooth sensitivity and restoring enamel gloss after whitening procedures
•Relieving dry mouth caused by certain medications
•Reducing high oral acid levels from excessive soft drink consumption
•Reversing tooth sensitivity before and after professional cleaning
•Reducing high oral acid levels - sometimes a consequence of pregnancy
•Buffering acids produced by bacteria and plaque
•Regular conditioning during orthodontics, during and after bands or brackets have been removed, to prevent and reverse white spot lesions
•Providing a topical coating for patients suffering from erosion, caries and conditions arising from xerostomia


Here's a link to their site: http://www.mi-paste.com/

Here's a link to the cheapest price I could find for a ten pack: http://www.amazon.co...ef=pd_sbs_hpc_2

If you take strontium at a separate meal from your calcium supplements, both your bones and teeth will be thicker and stronger. Strontium both partially inhibits osteoclast activity (which results in a higher ratio of osteoblast to osteoclast activity), and some of it also becomes part of the bone matrix which make it stronger (with teeth they become more resistant to caries or breaking).

#30 niner

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Posted 19 May 2010 - 04:28 AM

I found a better deal on MI Paste; might be more recent, I dunno. For some reason I was under the impression that I needed a prescription for MI paste... But I guess not.

http://www.amazon.co...ef=pd_sim_hpc_1




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