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Dental history for Imminst members


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#1 VictorBjoerk

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Posted 06 March 2009 - 11:17 PM


Today I visited the dentist. In Sweden we have free dental care until 19 so this was the last time I visited them for free. It was a bit funny since I've never had any caries,plaque,dental calculus,inflammation,any need for any dental correction etc, absolutely nothing during my whole life! When looking at the journal there were nothing at all!
So I have no reason to suffer from dental phobia.
The only thing the dentist complained about was when I told them I used fluoride-free toothpaste. (I''ve been convinced by a friend who has written about the dangers of high fluoride consumption to use a fluoride-free toothpaste)

I intend to keep my dental health this way.

So what is your dental history and how do you keep your teeth in good condition?

Edited by VictorBjoerk, 07 March 2009 - 12:27 AM.


#2 .fonclea.

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Posted 15 March 2009 - 12:55 PM

mine is a disaster. :|w My parents didn't have money enough to pay the cost, i just had the basic care. I had to wait 18 years with my own income.
In france you have to pay an extra inssurance to cover what the universal heathl care doesn't take in charge.
Now i guess i am in the average, i have a little toth decay but i live in UK since few, i don't know how it's gonna go.
By the way, many french think twice before going to a dentist, in north africa the job is good for half pice, my father did in algeria.

To keep my tooth well, i just never eat sweets, don't smok, no cafe and brush them.


If you had any advise to keep them srtong ?

#3 Johan

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Posted 15 March 2009 - 01:06 PM

My dental history is about average, I guess. I have had a few fillings, a little caries and plaque, but no dental corrections of any kind. As Victor says, we have free dental care for our entire childhood and adolescence in Sweden, so I've never had to pay anything - until my next visit, that is, since I'm 20 now.

My dental health has improved significantly since I started eating healthier a few years ago, and even more when I started practicing CR about one year ago. It's probably because of the absence of added sugar in my diet - when I was younger, I used to eat some candy and have a Coca-Cola every now and then.

Edited by Johan, 15 March 2009 - 01:08 PM.


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#4 kismet

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Posted 18 March 2009 - 10:58 AM

I haven't had any issues with my teeth so far. Do I get a cookie? (no, wait not a good idea)
I am young and lazy, I really need to do more for my teeth, though, or I will have some problems very soon.

Edited by kismet, 18 March 2009 - 10:59 AM.


#5 lunarsolarpower

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Posted 21 March 2009 - 08:10 AM

I remember my grandparents telling me to take good care of my teeth - as a financial investment. At the time I had no idea that you can spend $60,000-$100,000 on your teeth. Or as a prosthodontist put it to us after going through one of his cases last week: about an S-Class.

Dr. Denny at USC has found that there are different genotypes of people who are at vastly different risk levels of developing decay. The good news is that 99.9% including those at very high risk can stay caries-free throughout life with adequate and appropriate prevention. The downside is most don't know or care enough for that to happen. I personally only learned proper flossing technique 6 months before entering dental school. I guess I'm lucky to not be one of those with a genetically determined extreme caries risk profile. I think I have a couple small composite fillings and perhaps a few preventive sealants.

I don't think everyone realizes that the parents have to assume total responsibility for plaque control in children up to 6 years old and continue to provide help and active supervision of the oral hygiene process up to the age of 12. Just asking a kid "Did you brush?" is not sufficient. Parents often assume motor coordination is more developed than it actually is. In addition children tend to perform up and down strokes on the anterior teeth with perhaps a few back and forth strokes on the external surface of the lower posterior teeth favoring one side. Depending how you count there are at least 18 regions that need to be reached by the brush in addition to the interproximal areas where the floss is necessary. The rule of thumb is to spend 2 minutes brushing to get the job done. Now they make toothbrushes that play a tune for the time needed to reinforce adequate brushing time.

#6 lunarsolarpower

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Posted 21 March 2009 - 08:17 AM

It was a bit funny since I've never had any caries,plaque,dental calculus,inflammation,any need for any dental correction etc, absolutely nothing during my whole life! When looking at the journal there were nothing at all!


They may not have been of clinical significance, but if you've been alive and used your mouth you've had at least those two!

#7 pro-d

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Posted 21 March 2009 - 10:45 AM

I've only needed a couple of fillings in my 29 years and only go to the dentist when I have pain, which is very rare. I did suffer some dental erosion but this hasn't progressed since I cut down on fizzy drinks a decade ago (and I had a bad habit of swishing it in my mouth).

I use a fluoride toothpaste but only out of habit.

Today I visited the dentist. In Sweden we have free dental care until 19 so this was the last time I visited them for free. It was a bit funny since I've never had any caries,plaque,dental calculus,inflammation,any need for any dental correction etc, absolutely nothing during my whole life! When looking at the journal there were nothing at all!
So I have no reason to suffer from dental phobia.
The only thing the dentist complained about was when I told them I used fluoride-free toothpaste. (I''ve been convinced by a friend who has written about the dangers of high fluoride consumption to use a fluoride-free toothpaste)

I intend to keep my dental health this way.

So what is your dental history and how do you keep your teeth in good condition?



#8 kismet

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Posted 21 March 2009 - 12:29 PM

I've only needed a couple of fillings in my 29 years and only go to the dentist when I have pain, which is very rare.

I don't think this is particularly prudent, at least that's what my dentist says. I go to the dentist twice a year for a check-up (it's free anyway). Isn't it similar to an annual health exam? Everyone should do it and not wait until it's too late.

#9 kenj

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Posted 21 March 2009 - 07:09 PM

I have brushed and rinsed my teeth/day-night with xylitol rather than fluor (fluoride) for the last 10 months, so I'm curious to ask about that at my next dental examination, and see if I have like 15 cavities...........

#10 Matt

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Posted 21 March 2009 - 09:23 PM

I haven't had any new cavities that needed filling since I started CRON, but have had a few molars filled from years of neglect. I now visit the dentist 3 times per year. Dental health is so important for overall health.

Edited by Matt, 21 March 2009 - 09:25 PM.


#11 forever freedom

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Posted 21 March 2009 - 09:38 PM

I always had great care of my teeth, fortunately my parents could afford proper dental care. Never had any caries or anything similar. I used dental braces for a few years, though.

Fortunately, my wisdom teeth grew perfectly (i heard the odds of that happening are like 5%), so also didn't go through the pain of taking them off.


I don't use any special product for my teeth, just brush them with normal toothpaste 3-4 times a day.

Edited by forever freedom, 21 March 2009 - 09:39 PM.


#12 lunarsolarpower

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Posted 21 March 2009 - 09:48 PM

I go to the dentist twice a year for a check-up (it's free anyway). Isn't it similar to an annual health exam? Everyone should do it and not wait until it's too late.

Word.

#13 forever freedom

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Posted 21 March 2009 - 09:58 PM

I go to the dentist twice a year for a check-up (it's free anyway). Isn't it similar to an annual health exam? Everyone should do it and not wait until it's too late.

Word.


Lol wouldn't it have been simpler to use an "i agree" instead of a short expression but that has to be explained making you spend more time than if you just wrote a statement that is a bit bigger? By the way, most people understand what the expression "word" means anyways.

#14 kismet

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Posted 22 March 2009 - 12:51 AM

I go to the dentist twice a year for a check-up (it's free anyway). Isn't it similar to an annual health exam? Everyone should do it and not wait until it's too late.

Word.


Lol wouldn't it have been simpler to use an "i agree" instead of a short expression but that has to be explained making you spend more time than if you just wrote a statement that is a bit bigger? By the way, most people understand what the expression "word" means anyways.

Word.

On a related unrelated side-note:
Vitamin D (36-40ng/ml) is good for your teeth, but only if you are old? Data from the NHANES III:
"25(OH)D(3) concentrations were significantly and inversely associated with AL [periodontal attachment loss] in men and women aged > or =50 y. Compared with men in the highest 25(OH)D(3) quintile, those in the lowest quintile had a mean AL that was 0.39 mm (95% CI: 0.17, 0.60 mm) higher; in women, the difference in AL between the lowest and highest quintiles was 0.26 mm (0.09, 0.43 mm)."
For a review see: http://www.ajcn.org/...nt/full/84/1/18

#15 .fonclea.

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Posted 31 March 2009 - 04:37 PM

I remember my grandparents telling me to take good care of my teeth - as a financial investment. At the time I had no idea that you can spend $60,000-$100,000 on your teeth. Or as a prosthodontist put it to us after going through one of his cases last week: about an S-Class.



I spent 700€ for my teeth in the past... nothing is more important than health. :)




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