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Receding Gums


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#31 MizTen

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Posted 04 September 2013 - 05:30 PM

Any updates, MizTen? I received my Idebenone yesterday (orange stuff) and would add like 0.8g to 170mg of a Jason Fluoride free toothpaste, not sure how well it dissolves. Is that a reasonable concentration?
I'll also add some Ascorbylphosphate, it's not as acidic as pure Vitamin C so better for the enamel.


As a plan B: I've seen there are quite some Coenzyme-Q10 toothpastes out there, even without Fluoride.


No updates yet as I did not have enough idebenone to do this.

I am waiting on a new order of idebenone. My idea of adding it to an evening oil pulling is probably dumb, because the oil from oil pulling really does need to be spit out, whereas the idebenone should probably linger for a while in the mouth and then be swallowed.

It's oil soluble. So my new and untested protocol will be: do evening oil pulling, then add about 30 mg of idebenone to a small quantity ( maybe 1 tsp) of colorless oil, such as coconut oil or avocado oil, apply as thoroughly as possible to gums, focusing on the deepest pockets. Swish around, keep in mouth as long as possible, swallowing excess if necessary, then sleep.

I'm pretty sure this will work. Oral idebenone and Co-Q-10 definitely improve the health of my gums. If the idebenone causes teeth to become orange it's not worth it even for reduced pockets. Vanity trumps health sometimes...



#32 DorianGrey

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Posted 04 September 2013 - 05:38 PM

I once tried turmeric, it such a cheap anti-oxidant but as a spice it stains everything. I completely switched to capsules. The idea with the oil is good, what about jojoba or flax (high in ALA)? Because the idebenone is quite expensive I would try 10-15mg first, I could use a micro-spatula I own for these amounts.

#33 aconita

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Posted 11 December 2013 - 03:38 AM

Gums do recede because bone does, bone recedes because trauma to it or bacterial infection in gums pockets, brushing too hard may cause gums recession too,usually on front teeth (for some reason back teeth seems less effected by hard brushing), when caused by hard brushing usually the receding appear as oblong (much deeper on the front of the teeth and much less between teeth or on the sides of the teeth face).

Officially it is not possible to grow back gums (that is what a dentist usually will tell you), it doesn't necessarily mean it will not be possible but...the problem is the gums line will stay only a few millimeters from the bone, if there is a bone loss the gum has no support and recedes as well, the solution will be to re-grow bone and that doesn't seems to be feasible yet (at least not around teeth, it may be possible only where one or more teeth are missing).

Anyway what REALLY WORKS in stopping bacterial infections and strengthen gums WITHOUT ANY DOUBTS is as simple and cheap as you'll hardly imagine: Hydrogen peroxide.

Just put a little bit of 3,5% hydrogen peroxide (common strength, the one used to clean wounds) in a small non-metal scoop and dip the tooth brush in it, brush as usual, actually you don't need to brush all that much as recommended by dentists, brush carefully everywhere but gently and for only a short time (30 seconds or so for the whole denture will suffice).

It will cause foam to form in the mouth that after getting used to resemble toothpaste.

Spit,and rinse with water, use some more hydrogen peroxide as a mouth wash, you really don't need much of it since the foam will fill you mouth and goes everywhere, swish around and keep in your mouth for as long as few minutes, spit, rinse with water.

Brushing will displace food particles, hydrogen peroxide will kill unwanted bacteria (anaerobic), brushing too much or too hard damages enamel and does nothing to bacteria hidden in pockets or lurking in difficult to reach areas, hydrogen peroxide mouth washes reaches everywhere and kills all of them easy.

Follow this procedure once a day before bedtime and in no time all bacterial problems will be gone guarantee.

If gums are in bad conditions in the beginning will get white from the hydrogen peroxide and get painful, just use regular toothpaste for one or 2 days and start again, soon your gums will heal and get so strong and healthy you'll throw away all toothpastes and mouth washes without ever look back.

Common hydrogen peroxide works well (the one sold in drugstores for cleaning wounds) but usually tastes horrible because in order to be conserved other substances are added to it, I strongly suggest, even if it is not mandatory at all, to buy food grade hydrogen peroxide, maybe 35% strength (don't use it pure, of course, dilute 1 part in 11 parts of distilled water, it will provide 3,5% strength).

Food grade hydrogen peroxide is pure and needs to be kept in the FREEZER, that is why I suggest 35% (small bottle), keep it in the freezer (it doesn't freeze), once in a while dilute some as above in order to get 3,5%, keep that in the FRIDGE.

Avoid contact with metals when diluting or storing hydrogen peroxide, light damages Hydrogen peroxide, storing it in dark containers may be better (the freezer is quite dark anyway :)).

250ml 35% hydrogen peroxide will last me more than 1 year, brushing teeth and mouth wash with it every day.

Is that cheap enough? :D

I guarantee it works far beyond your wildest dreams.

If you like adding some drops of mint essential oil (vapor distilled) to the the hydrogen peroxide it will give a nice taste to it and provide an extra antibacterial action.

It is possible to mix hydrogen peroxide to baking soda to brush teeth with, make a paste quite loose, baking soda is good for many reasons but it may be a little abrasive on teeth enamel, if your enamel is strong go for it, otherwise do it only once a week or so in order to provide some extra abrasive cleaning (if you wish).

Miswak in powder can be added too in order to obtain a paste like consistency and added "medicinal" power, if you don't find it in powder buy sticks, peel the bark off, place in a coffee grinder, done.

Add some xylitol to hydrogen peroxide mouthwash if you like.

When gums are inflamed become swollen, if after a while your gums seems to retract it is because the swollen is gone.

The above doesn't grow gums back but STOPS from further retracting and heals pockets, inflammation and any pathogen in the mouth, including canker sores, prevent cavities, whiten teeth, doesn't damage enamel, doesn't poison you, no fluoride, no chemicals, cost almost nothing.

For sensitive teeth/exposed roots try mumio solved in a bit of distilled water once or twice a day, a few drops on the effected areas or mouth wash after the hydrogen peroxide procedure, in my experience works so fast it is hard to believe, it is a very good idea in order to help healing gums and mouth even faster than with hydrogen peroxide alone..

I hope this will help, certainly has done miracles for me.
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#34 Lufega

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Posted 09 March 2014 - 06:22 PM

I was going to start a new thread but figured I'd revive this old one. Found this study showing that topical taurine can regenerate the gums. Maybe someone can read the full version and interpret it. They used a 1% solution. In my notes, I had an entry of a 2% taurine solution regenerating the gingiva but I can't locate the source.

This seems like something you could add to a mouthwash, cheaply with no concerns for side effects.

I've been having this problem for sometime and it's quite bad now. Recently figured out I had a zinc deficiency and started supplementing and responding well to it. Since zinc is important for collagen formation I know it's involved somehow but I can't find any studies to prove it. Topical zinc maybe ?

Anyways, here's the study.

J Periodontol. 2012 Jan;83(1):127-34. doi: 10.1902/jop.2011.100568. Epub 2011 May 16.
Effect of the topical use of the antioxidant taurine on the two basement membrane proteins of regenerating oral gingival epithelium.


Abstract


BACKGROUND:

The essential amino acid taurine has important physiologic and pathologic roles, and has been shown to have osmoregulatory, antioxidative, antiapoptotic, anti-inflammatory, and antilipid activities. However, the response of oral gingival epithelium totaurine during wound healing remains unclear. The goal of this study is to evaluate the expression of laminin 5 and Type IV collagen histologically in regenerating gingival epithelium after direct application of taurine on incised human gingival samples.
METHODS:

The study was conducted on 16 gingival samples obtained from gingivectomy specimens of eight adult patients with generalized gingival overgrowth. The samples were divided into two groups: gingiva with 1% taurine-hydrated collagen membrane (n = 8) and saline-hydrated collagen membrane (n = 8) applied specimens. The length of the newly formed epithelium on the wound surface and inflammation was assessed on hematoxylin and eosin-stained sections. Basement membrane formation was evaluated by detection of laminin 5 and Type IV collagen expressions on immunohistochemically stained samples.
RESULTS:

Complete new epithelial formation was observed in 1% taurine-treated gingivectomy specimens, whereas incomplete regeneration of the epithelium was observed in control gingivectomy specimens (P <0.05). The length of the newly formed epithelium showed a negative correlation with inflammation in the taurine group (P = -0.712; P <0.05). Immunoreactivity for both laminin 5 and Type IV collagen did not show any significant difference between groups.
CONCLUSION:

The local application of taurine-hydrated collagen membrane on human gingival wounds demonstrated the histologic evidence of rapid reepithelization with taurine.


There was another study showing that caffeine also had some effect PMID: 2610305
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#35 Lufega

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Posted 09 March 2014 - 07:04 PM

Some support to my zinc theory:


Responses of human gingival and periodontal fibroblasts to a low-zinc environment.

Abstract
Morphology, motility, proliferation rate and markers of oxidative stress in primary human gingival fibroblasts (GF) and periodontal ligamental fibroblasts (PDL-F) grown in zinc-deficient cultivation medium (ZDM), were studied over a 5-week culture period. A low-zincenvironment effectively reduced the total, as well as the free, intracellular zinc content in both cell types, over the course of the experiment. Decreased intracellular zinc content resulted in altered cellular morphology, reduced motility, and rearrangement of actin and tubulin in the cytoskeleton. In addition, fibroblasts with low zinc content exhibited decreased proliferation, accompanied by changes in cell cycle distribution, expression of specific biochemical markers, increased oxidative stress and the activation of caspase-3. Supplementation of ZDM with exogenous zinc prevented the loss of intracellular zinc, while also restoring the morphology, cell proliferation and mitogenic signalling of the cultured cells. Moreover, such supplemented cells were protected against oxidative stress and cell death. Of the two primary cell cultures examined, GF were more sensitive to decreased intracellular zinc content, when compared to PDL-F. The results obtained suggest that the human primary cell cultures can be useful for the longer-term evaluation of the effects of nutritional factors originating from the environment.



CONCLUSIONS:

Toothbrushing with the zinc citrate formulation (1% zinc citrate) resulted in significant reductions in oral bacteria from all of the intraoral locations.
PMID:20480054




Zinc in etiology of periodontal disease.

Microbial plaque is the main etiological factor of periodontal disease. The bacterial polysaccharides stimulate gingival neutrophils and macrophages to interleukin-1 (IL-1) production. IL-1 causes a complex of redistribution processes with liver as the central organ. Accumulation of zinc in liver and their copper and ceruloplasmin production also elicits increase of copper and decrease of zinc in gingiva. The elevated level of copper in connection with zinc deficiency in gingiva causes the increase of permeability of gingival epithelium for bacteria. The stimulated inflammatory infiltrate produces more IL-1 and the vicious circle is complete. PMID: 8502198



Lastly, oral zinc supplementation does increase Zn status in the gingiva and promote healing.

Zinc concentration in normal and healing gingival tissues in beagle dogs.

Previous studies have shown that the administration of zinc (Zn) may enhance the healing of gingival and other wounds. This study was undertaken to determine if Zn concentration ([Zn]) is increased in healing gingival tissues and if oral supplementation of Zn would result in a local increase in [Zn] within these tissues. On Day 0, biopsies were obtained from the maxillary left buccal gingiva of each of 10 beagle dogs. Gingival biopsies were taken from the healing original biopsy sites on Day 14. On Day 15, oral supplementation of Zn gluconate (250 mg/day, equivalent to 32.5 mg of elemental Zn) was begun in seven dogs. Three dogs remained as unsupplemented controls. Two weeks later (Day 28), normal gingival biopsies were obtained from the right side of the maxilla and on Day 42 final biopsies were taken from the same healing sites. In addition, serum samples were obtained on Days 0, 14, 28 and 42. All samples were analyzed for Zn content using atomic absorption spectrophotometry. The [Zn] of healing tissues was significantly higher (P less than 0.0005) than normal tissues. This was also true when healing tissues were compared to normal tissues during the Zn supplementation phase (Day 28 vs. Day 42; P less than 0.005). Zn supplementation resulted in significant increases in Zn levels in normal (Day 0 vs. Day 28; P less than 0.05) and healing tissues (Day 14 vs. Day 42; P less than 0.05).(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID: 6584593



Maybe zinc can be added to this taurine mixture to have a more localized effect ?

Edited by Lufega, 09 March 2014 - 07:07 PM.

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#36 ighbal

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Posted 26 May 2014 - 10:28 AM

Hi,

 

I have tried to find on the market some taurine topical solutions for a similar gum recession problem I am having, but unfortunately, I could only find out a cream for cats, dogs and horses :).

 

Do you have a reference where I could find out such product for humans ?

 

Or is "buying a powder" and apply it locally is the solution ? Or should I create my own lotion .. then how ? PLease help ! thanks

 

 



#37 aconita

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Posted 26 May 2014 - 02:16 PM

In my view it will not be easy to have taurine working because a taurine-hydrated collagen membrane is something quite different from applying taurine topically.

 

In my knowledge a membrane is stitched on the wound providing a constant taurine rich environment to the gums (for example as an alternative to gum grafting), the same will not be achievable with a simple topical application.

 

Just adding some taurine powder to a mouthwash will probably provide taurine to the gums for a far to short amount of time in order to be therapeutically significant.

 

It will be possible to mix some xanthan gum powder to a solution of taurine and water in order to get a gel like consistency,,,but even doing so how long the gel will stay in place before getting dilute by saliva and swallowed?

 

The good news is that taurine powder is very cheap and easy to get as xanthan gum powder is...therefore giving it a try at least will cause no arm to the wallet.

 

 

 

 


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#38 DorianGrey

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Posted 26 May 2014 - 02:47 PM

Hi,

 

I have tried to find on the market some taurine topical solutions for a similar gum recession problem I am having, but unfortunately, I could only find out a cream for cats, dogs and horses :).

 

Do you have a reference where I could find out such product for humans ?

 

Or is "buying a powder" and apply it locally is the solution ? Or should I create my own lotion .. then how ? PLease help ! thanks

 

 

 

You could take the animal stuff if it has a registration number (FDA?) that proofs it is manufactured under GMP and has an authority approval.

 

Drugs for animals aren't so different from human. Considering it is something topic with a well known ingredient. Just look if the Taurine concentration is about the same you want for human gums. I really don't expect anyone would more than double it.



#39 blood

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Posted 20 June 2014 - 03:52 AM

I recently noticed that my gums are looking very healthy (they're a great pink colour). When I went to the dentist for a checkup last week, he said that my gums looked "extremely healthy" (he said this at three separate points throughout the appointment). He's never commented on my gum health in the past. The things I've been doing differently over the last 6 months (that I think might have had an impact on my gum health) include:
- 300 mg/day ubiquinol
- 150 mg/day pycnogenol
- 500 mg/day vitamin c
- Brush picks

Edited by blood, 20 June 2014 - 03:54 AM.

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#40 icyT

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Posted 03 May 2015 - 04:35 AM

I have this prob like crazy on my lower-right canine, not sure why. I wonder if I brush/floss/chew more aggressively there. It's certainly not due to LACK of care.

 

Transplant sounds cool. Does CoQ10 help with regrowing lost flesh or somethin?



#41 Logic

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Posted 03 May 2015 - 06:15 PM

An old home remidy for toothache here is Clove Oil.
I bought a bottle when I had toothache and applied it with an earbud as recommended.

My 1st impression was that the taste made one forget all about the toothache!   :)  (Its BAD!)

But the oil, applied once, 'cured' the toothache for over 2 weeks.  To my mind this means that clove oil contains a compound that is extremely effective at killing oral bacteria.  Hopefully something that tastes and smells less offencive than than the complete mix of substances in clove oil.

 

Synergistic effect between clove oil and its major compounds and antibiotics against oral bacteria.

...clove oil and its major compounds, eugenol and β-caryophyllene were evaluated...The antibacterial activity of the clove oil was higher than β-caryophyllene but was similar to eugenol against all tested oral bacteria...

http://www.ncbi.nlm....pubmed/21397894

 

Clove oil has biological activities, such as antibacterial, antifungal, insecticidal and antioxidant properties, and is used traditionally as a savoring agent and antimicrobial material in food

...Clove oil has biological activities, such as antibacterial, antifungal, insecticidal and antioxidant properties, and is used traditionally as a savoring agent and antimicrobial material in food...The high levels of eugenol contained in clove essential oil are responsible for its strong biological and antimicrobial activities...inhibiting a great number of Gram-negative and Gram-positive bacteria as well as different types of yeast

http://www.ncbi.nlm....les/PMC3769004/

 

So it looks like Eugenol is worth looking at.

 

But my quick research also uncovered the far more palatable  Cinnamon Oil:

 

Comparative study of cinnamon oil and clove oil on some oral microbiota.

Cinnamon oil was found to be more effective than clove oil exhibiting broad spectrum of antibacterial activity inhibiting all the ten test bacterial species involved in dental caries.

http://www.ncbi.nlm....pubmed/22783715

 

In fact; a pubmed search should turn up a good number of beneficial as well as palatable oils, each best at killing a specific bacteria, one could add to VCO for oil pulling.

I believe the the 20 minutes required for oil pulling is so that the oil/s can permeate into the gums and also into the area between gum and tooth?

 

Thx for the Taurine info Lufega.  I will add that to my oil  etc mix.  I think the 20 minutes of exposure should be enough to be clinically effective?

 

 

The Google search I used:

https://www.google.c...oil oral pubmed

 

 

 

 


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#42 mustardseed41

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Posted 03 May 2015 - 07:41 PM

Ive been using a couple of drops of this oil nightly in my mouth for a good while now. I take a sip of water after and swish around my mouth for at least a minute.

http://www.amazon.co...rds=thieves oil

 

Much cheaper than the overpriced Thieves Oil original. I do it for oral health and health in general. Have not gotten my usual yearly cold since doing this.

Tastes very good. :)



#43 nowayout

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Posted 04 May 2015 - 09:34 PM

I have this prob like crazy on my lower-right canine, not sure why. I wonder if I brush/floss/chew more aggressively there. It's certainly not due to LACK of care.

 

Transplant sounds cool. Does CoQ10 help with regrowing lost flesh or somethin?

 

Yes. I have that problem too.  According to my dentist it is common in right-handed people (left-handed people would have the problem at the lower-left canine) and is due to overbrushing.  Because of the angle that is where a right-handed person would apply most pressure when brushing.   



#44 nowayout

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Posted 04 May 2015 - 09:37 PM

An old home remidy for toothache here is Clove Oil.

 

Cloves are numbing - they cause a local anesthetic effect, which is probably the main reason for their traditional use for toothache, 
 


Edited by nowayout, 04 May 2015 - 09:38 PM.


#45 Kalliste

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Posted 07 May 2015 - 10:15 AM

 

I have this prob like crazy on my lower-right canine, not sure why. I wonder if I brush/floss/chew more aggressively there. It's certainly not due to LACK of care.

 

Transplant sounds cool. Does CoQ10 help with regrowing lost flesh or somethin?

 

Yes. I have that problem too.  According to my dentist it is common in right-handed people (left-handed people would have the problem at the lower-left canine) and is due to overbrushing.  Because of the angle that is where a right-handed person would apply most pressure when brushing.   

 

 

Lots of people ruin their teeth with hard brushing.

There are extra-soft brushes. Only hold them with the thumb and one finger. Rinse the brush in hot water to make it even softer ;)


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#46 shp5

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Posted 18 November 2016 - 11:16 AM

Would liposomal taurine be an idea? I have the equipment for lipo C.

#47 SamuraiJack

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Posted 15 January 2019 - 06:03 PM

So from reading though this thread and a few other sources online, this is what i have come up with to combat Receding Gums.
Let me know if you guys see any that I should add or remove from the DIY toothpaste and DIY Mouth wash.

DIY Toothpaste for Receding Gums:

  • Gengigel Gel toothpaste as the base
  • 2% taurine
  • 1% zinc citrate
  • 2% Hydrogen Peroxide
  • Ascorbyl phosphate Vitamin C
  • Peppermint essential oil
  • Cinnamon essential oil

DIY Mouth Wash for Receding Gums:

  • Coconut Oil as the base
  • Peppermint essential oil (a couple drops)
  • Cinnamon essential oil (a couple drops)
  • 2% Hydrogen Peroxide 
  • Xylitol
  • Baking soda
  • Ascorbyl phosphate Vitamin C
  • 2% Taurine
  • 1% Zinc citrate

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#48 Lufega

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Posted 22 January 2019 - 04:32 PM

I recently noticed that my gums are looking very healthy (they're a great pink colour). When I went to the dentist for a checkup last week, he said that my gums looked "extremely healthy" (he said this at three separate points throughout the appointment). He's never commented on my gum health in the past. The things I've been doing differently over the last 6 months (that I think might have had an impact on my gum health) include:
- 300 mg/day ubiquinol
- 150 mg/day pycnogenol
- 500 mg/day vitamin c
- Brush picks

 

thanks for posting this.  I do not tolerate Coq10 or uniquinol well but I've been brushing with a little matcha powder daily.  Green tea stimulated formation of connective tissue and prevents the breakdown.  It also controls bad bacteria in the oral cavity.  I'll give it time to see if it does anything.

 

Has a bit of whitening effect and so far my mouth is very clean.


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