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Brain Supplements for vegetarians & vegans


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#1 spider

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Posted 09 January 2010 - 09:19 PM


Essential Brain Supplements for vegetarians and vegans
I noticed that quitte a few vegetariens and vegans or among the ImmInst members. Some of them, like non-vegetarians, are complaining about brain fog or a tired mind. Insteed of jumping right into nootropics, you might want to considers essential brain supllements first.

The supplements below are very inexpensive, so suitable for full-time high-school and college students.


Acetyl-l-carnitine (alcar)
250 mg - 500 mg is enough.
Alcar is needed by the neurons to effecienty deliver fatty acids into the mitochodria (the energy factories of cells).

CoQ10
An antiocidant.
It plays an essential role in the energy process within brain cells.
50 mg per day would probably be more than enough. I take 100 mg each day.

Creatine
Meat is very rich in creatine.
A studie showed that when vegetarians take 5 gram creatine each day for 3 months that their IQ-scores and learning ability significantly improved.

Flaxseed oil (an ALA source)This a very cheap oil to buy. After the bottle is opened, it needs to be refrigerated and needs to be consumed within 21 days.
It is very rich in ALA. ALA is a fatty acid that can be converted to the well known EPA and DHA omega-3 fatty acids. DHA is needed to create effecient synapses (brain cell connections).

The bees
Taking B-50, esp. B12 (methylcobalamin), is recommendable for vegetarians.

Protein
Soy.
Nutritional or brewer's yeast.
Nuts, like cashew and almonds.
Quorn.

Read about Quorn here:
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Quorn





You additions and/or modifications are highly welcome.
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#2 The Immortalist

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Posted 09 January 2010 - 11:34 PM

Essential Brain Supplements for vegetarians and vegans
Creatine
A studie showed that when vegetarians take 5 gram creatine each day for 3 months that their IQ-scores and learning ability significantly improved.


What are your sources?

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#3 spider

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Posted 10 January 2010 - 02:41 PM

Creatine 'boosts brain power'

The dietary supplement creatine - known to improve athletic performance - can also boost memory and intelligence, researchers claim.

Creatine is a natural compound found in muscle tissue, and has been popular with athletes looking for ways to increase fitness.
However, experts say that it has a role in maintaining energy levels to the brain, and have the theory that taking more creatine might actually improve mental performance.
Researchers from the University of Sydney and Macquarie University, both in Australia, tested this by giving creatine supplements to 45 young adult volunteers.
Vegetarians were used for the tests, mainly because meat in the diet is in itself a source of creatine, and it would be difficult to gauge exactly how much an individual had consumed.
The volunteers were split up and given either creatine or a "dummy" pill for periods of six weeks.
Their ability to repeat back from memory long sequences of numbers was tested, and a general IQ test also given to the volunteers.
The researchers, led by Dr Caroline Rae, found that the creatine supplements - at least in the short term - seemed to have a positive effect.
She said: "Both of these tests require fast brain power and the IQ test was conducted under time pressure.
"The results were clear with both our experimental groups and in both test scenarios.
"Creatine supplementation gave a significant measurable boost to brain power."
The researchers found that subjects' ability to remember long numbers improved from a number length of approximately seven digits, to an average of 8.5.
Dr Rae believes that the creatine increases the amount of energy available to the brain for computational tasks, improving general mental ability.
Health risks?
Little is known about the long-term effects of taking creatine - there are reports of effects on blood sugar balance.
The supplement is also notorious for creating an unpleasant odour in the vicinity of the taker.
There is no evidence that the mental boost would continue over time, even if the patient carried on taking creatine for months rather than weeks.
Dr Rae said: "Creatine supplementation may be of use to those requiring boosted mental performance in the short term - for example university students."
The study was published in the Royal Society journal Proceedings B.


http://news.bbc.co.u...lth/3145223.stm




"The level of creatine supplementation chosen was 5g per day as this is a level that has previously been shown to increase brain creatine levels. "

"a significant boost to both working memory and general intelligence"

"[Creatine] has also been trialed successfully in the treatment of neurological, neuromuscular and atherosclerotic disease. "


"(...) to reach the level of supplementation in this experiment [(5 g creatine/day)] would involve eating around 2 kg of meat a day!"


These quotes are from the same study.

#4 Pike

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Posted 10 January 2010 - 05:55 PM

http://jn.nutrition....act/139/10/1926

Coenzyme Q10 (CoQ10) is widely consumed as a dietary supplement to enhance bioenergetic capacity and to ameliorate the debilitative effects of the aging process or certain pathological conditions. Our main purpose in this study was to determine whether CoQ10 intake does indeed attenuate the age-associated losses in motor, sensory, and cognitive functions or decrease the rate of mortality in mice. Mice were fed a control nonpurified diet or that diet containing 0.68 mg/g (low dosage) or 2.6 mg/g (high dosage) CoQ10, starting at 4 mo of age, and were tested for sensory, motor, and cognitive function at 7, 15, and 25 mo of age. Amounts of the ubiquinols CoQ9H2 and CoQ10H2 measured in a parallel study were augmented in the cerebral cortex but not in any other region of the brain. Intake of the low-CoQ10 diet did not affect age-associated decrements in muscle strength, balance, coordinated running, or learning/memory, whereas intake at the higher amount increased spontaneous activity, worsened the age-related losses in acuity to auditory and shock stimuli, and impaired the spatial learning/memory of old mice. The CoQ10 diets did not affect survivorship of mice through 25 mo of age. Our results suggest that prolonged intake of CoQ10 in low amounts has no discernable impact on cognitive and motor functions whereas intake at higher amounts exacerbates cognitive and sensory impairments encountered in old mice. These findings do not support the notion that CoQ10 is a fitness-enhancing or an "antiaging" substance under normal physiological conditions.


also, regarding ALA, even in the healthiest of individuals the conversion rates of ALA into EPA and DHA could be called piss poor, at best. as i understand, there are several EPA and DHA supplements on the market that are derived from algae, so, i suppose that could be an option for some of you. Off the top of my head, i know that Deva Vegan is one of those supplement companies.

#5 spider

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Posted 10 January 2010 - 07:47 PM

(...) there are several EPA and DHA supplements on the market that are derived from algae, so, i suppose that could be an option for some of you. Off the top of my head, i know that Deva Vegan is one of those supplement companies.


Until now, I thought that all epa and dha fatty acids where from fish. Good to know that there are also algae derived alternatives.

Thanks for your input.

#6 Endymion

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Posted 07 February 2010 - 04:32 AM

Thanks for the post, being a vegetarian, it makes sense to at least account for any possible dietary deficiencies as the first port of call.
I'll give creatine and ALCAR a try. Creatine may help with energy levels too.
For vegetarian EPA/DHA (echoing Pike, flaxseed isn't nearly enough to give you the good stuff) I have started taking algae-derived capsules by V-Pure.
Do a google search and you'll find them. 350mg DHA, 50mg EPA per capsule.

#7 kellyfromusa

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Posted 12 October 2017 - 10:21 AM

What do you think of Noocube? Have you ever tried this product. I suggest my patients to go with Noocube. Its 100% natural brain supplement that any student or anybody can try. Know more about this product from Noocube website - www.noocube.org.

 

Thank you,

Kelly Delatorre,

Neurologist at Clay County Hospital, Alabama



#8 pamojja

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Posted 12 October 2017 - 11:13 AM

What do you think of Noocube? Have you ever tried this product. I suggest my patients to go with Noocube. Its 100% natural brain supplement that any student or anybody can try. Know more about this product from Noocube website - www.noocube.org.

 

Thank you,

Kelly Delatorre,

Neurologist at Clay County Hospital, Alabama

 

The side you link to doesn't disclose how much of each ingredient is in it. Personally would never recommend such, since I would want to know how much of each ingredient I'm getting, and its effects. Since everyone has a different bio-chemichal individuality, and reacts to each ingredient of a proprietary blend differently.

 

Moreover, proprietary blends usually are used to hide that it's expensive ingredients are in minute amounts, while inexpensives make the bulk. It is really a kind of cheat.

 

And then the highly conflicting information you provide: Giving professional credentials in one of your first posts promoting a questionable product? With obviously nil understanding of human physiology?

 

With all that information, I would have to haphazard the guess that you are spamming.
 


Edited by pamojja, 12 October 2017 - 11:16 AM.


#9 prunk

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Posted 12 October 2017 - 01:08 PM

What do you think of Noocube? Have you ever tried this product. I suggest my patients to go with Noocube. Its 100% natural brain supplement that any student or anybody can try. Know more about this product from Noocube website - www.noocube.org.

 

Thank you,

Kelly Delatorre,

Neurologist at Clay County Hospital, Alabama

Oh dear lord if one day you're my doctor!



#10 Oakman

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Posted 12 October 2017 - 02:11 PM

Noocube-Label-Ingredients-Review-1-e1490

 

Odd that it takes a web search to find some person posting the back label, they should be forthcoming of the ingredient amounts, not hiding them.



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#11 pamojja

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Posted 12 October 2017 - 06:21 PM

Noocube-Label-Ingredients-Review-1-e1490

 

Odd that it takes a web search to find some person posting the back label, they should be forthcoming of the ingredient amounts, not hiding them.

 

Not that odd, just as suspected. The bulk ingredients like bacopa and cat's claw powder are cheap, and at these amounts would most likely not even be effective as high quality extracts. Which they aren't.






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