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Benefits - real or illusory - and side effects to stimulating NGF


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#271 EricR

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Posted 15 November 2012 - 06:34 AM

Does anyone have a good source of bulk Lion's Mane, that's easily available to internationals?

In the mean time I've ordered Host Defence from iherb - but I really want to cap it myself with a few other supps for my wife (she has a form of MS)


Regarding MS: You might want to take a look at this video. Dr Terry Wahls tells how she reversed her MS symptoms by changing her diet. http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=KLjgBLwH3Wc

#272 Nootropic Cat

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Posted 11 January 2013 - 07:06 PM

So taking into consideration the slight cancer concern, my intuition is to dose on a one week on/one week off schedule, maybe after a four week 'attack' phase. Thoughts?

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#273 davegriffis

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Posted 26 April 2013 - 07:52 PM

I was diagnosed with Parkinson's Disease at the age of 29. I am 43 years old now. I have tried every know anti-Parkinson's drug that the manufacturers put out there. Usually to find that they make me very ill, without the benefits of relieving the Parkinson's symptoms. They work for a while, and then no more, or very minimal. I have also had Deep Brain Stimulation surgery performed, and it was helpful for about 4 years, but then no matter how it was adjusted, I wasn't getting full relief of symptoms. I then saw an infomercial one night, as I was lying down in a Parkinson's induced coma, about the positive effects of Lion's Mane Mushrooms. Needless to say I couldn't order them fast enough! I received the bottle, and took the first dose, without much relief. After taking the second dose, I found that I had to turn off my brain stimulators, and I have been taking these mushrooms since then. I no longer suffer the symptoms of Parkinson's Disease, and I do not have my stimulators on. I take two capsules in the morning, and two capsules in the evening. I have been doing this for 5 years. I think they work GREAT!!!
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#274 EricR

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Posted 26 April 2013 - 08:36 PM

@davegriffis: what brand of lion's mane are you using?

#275 FocusPocus

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Posted 14 August 2013 - 04:40 PM

Has anyone here used Eclectic Institute Mycetobotanicals Lion's Mane Drops and found them good enough?

#276 Nootropic Cat

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Posted 14 August 2013 - 08:43 PM

So taking into consideration the slight cancer concern, my intuition is to dose on a one week on/one week off schedule, maybe after a four week 'attack' phase. Thoughts?


Bump, while it's bumped. I actually semi-started this, taking 2x 1g of mycellium and 2x Swanson brand full spectrum LM for a month, but didn't get around to reordering. Anyone have any thoughts on this dosing schedule?

#277 spookytooth

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Posted 30 August 2013 - 02:59 PM

Is there any way to tell the quality of Lion's Mane powder?

#278 Tony V

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Posted 30 August 2013 - 03:54 PM

Intersting Topic

#279 _alex_

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Posted 21 November 2013 - 11:31 AM

So taking into consideration the slight cancer concern, my intuition is to dose on a one week on/one week off schedule, maybe after a four week 'attack' phase. Thoughts?


So I have spent most of the morning reading about NGF, BDNF, interaction with cancers and supplements/nutrients. I'm not convinced that there is an actual increase in getting any form of cancer from boosting NGF/BDNF by itself. Let me try to breakdown what I've manage to gather.

In cancer tumors elevated levels of NGF has been found and is known to be one of the factors that benefit the tumor in it's growth. Medication suppressing NGF in this case can be benificial for the treatment of the growth of the tumor. NGF is something that is naturally increased in areas where there is inflammation in order to help the body to repair the area. Inflammation is something that is the effect of all age related damage and diseases. In cancer models NFG is malfunctioning since the body can not separate the mutated cells from healthy ones, hence cancers cells growth and survivability is also enhanced since the body is repairing it. This is my understanding of what goes on with NGF in a cancer model.

There is a great article here that explains the real effect of antidepressants in the brain/body and also talks about BDNF in repairing inflammation in the brain (all backed with studies):

http://www.wellnessr...arly_mortality/

From looking at research on Lion's Mane the mushroom does increase NGF/BDNF levels. There is a bunch of other things that work on NGF/BDNF as well including common nutrients like blueberries and cucumin. Lion's Mane is proven anti-inflammatory and with other cancer benefits so the notion that it would increase risk for cancer sounds highly improbable to me. There is no studies that show anything like this with Lion's Mane and either with other natural NGF/BDNF modulators that I have been able to find. NGF/BDNF does not cause any cells to mutate into cancer cells, it might however not be beneficial if you already have cancer.

And to finish it all off, exercise has been shown to increase NFG and BDNF levels as well. Does that mean exercise causes cancer? No... There is a lot more to this than that. My personal opinion is that it's not probable and I will be adding Lion's Mane to my stack in the future.

Some more interesting stuff here on mental health and BDNF: http://samsnyder.com...ncreasing-bdnf/

Medications:
1. Ketamine use, which has rapid antidepressant properties, is associated with elevated levels of BDNF. (Link)

2. Memantine, which has antidepressant properties, elevates levels of BDNF. (Link)

3. Agomelatine increases hippocampal BDNF and has antidepressant properties. (Link)

4. Riluzole restores hippocampal BDNF expression and has antidepressant properties. (Link)

5. Escitalopram is an antidepressant that reverses BDNF deficits. (Link)

6. Atypical antipsychotics increase BDNF levels and have antidepressant effects. (Link)

7. Venlafaxine is an antidepressant that increases BDNF levels. (Link)

8. Olanzapine increases BDNF levels and augments antidepressant treatment. (Link)

9. Lithium upregulates BDNF and treats bipolar disorder. (Link)

10. Sertraline is an antidepressant that increases BDNF. (Link)

11. Risperidone increases BDNF levels and augments antidepressant treatment. (Link)

12. Imipramine is an antidepressant that up-regulates BDNF expression. (Link)

13. Mirtazapine is an antidepressant that increases BDNF gene expression. (Link)

14. Metyrapone enhances BDNF gene expression and has antidepressant properties. (Link)

15. Rolipram normalizes BDNF levels and has antidepressant properties. (Link)

Other Psychiatric Treatments:

1. Repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation increases BDNF levels and has antidepressant effects. (Link)

2. Electroconvulsive therapy elevates BDNF levels and has antidepressant effects. (Link)

3. Vagal nerve stimulation activates BDNF receptors and treats depression. (Link)

Food and Lifestyle:

1. A Mediterranean diet increases BDNF levels in depressed patients. (Link)

2. Green odor elevates BDNF and has antidepressant properties. (Link)

3. Music enhances BDNF levels and improves mood. (Link)

4. Alpha-linolenic acid increases BDNF and reduces depressive behavior. (Link)

Supplements:

1. Fish oil has antidepressant effects that involve BDNF. (Link)

2. Ginsenoside prevents a stress-induced reduction in BDNF levels. (Link)

3. Hyperoside has antidepressant properties and elevates BDNF expression. (Link)

4. Magnolol restores BDNF expression and has antidepressant effects. (Link)

5. Curcumin reverses a decrease in BDNF levels and produces an antidepressant effect. (Link)

6. Zinc increases the BDNF mRNA level and has antidepressant effects. (Link)

7. Beta-alanine increases BDNF concentration and has anti-anxiety properties. (Link)

8. Flavonols enhance BDNF expression and have antidepressant properties. (Link)

9. Suyu-Jiaonang attenuates a reduction in BDNF and has antidepressant properties. (Link)

10. Ferulic acid increases BDNF mRNA and ameliorates stress-induced depressive behavior. (Link)

11. Nicotine increases BDNF levels and has antidepressant properties. (Link)

12. Polygala tenuifolia increases BDNF expression and has antidepressant effects. (Link)

13. Xiaoyaosan reverses decreases in BDNF and has antidepressant effects. (Link)

14. Piperine reverses the reduction in BDNF and has antidepressant properties. (Link)

15. Danzhi Xiaoyao powder increases BDNF levels and reduces depressive symptoms. (Link)

16. Ginkgo biloba extract increases BDNF expression and reduces the effects of stress. (Link)

17. Eugenol has antidepressant activity and induces BDNF. (Link)



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#280 arboles

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Posted 24 January 2014 - 03:28 AM

Sorry Mushroom Harvest looked good, and described the extraction process, purity etc. I seem to get a good mental boost off of Lions mane, I'm taking some powdered form, but I can't be bothered to remember the company right now, only it was expensive for just a small bottle.


I think the one you bought before was the Fungi Perfecti liquid. A good product, but it is a little pricey.

The thing to remember is that the fruit bodies and mycelium contain different families of NGF-inducing molecules, so if you're looking for the greatest effect, you should be trying to use both. The other important fact is that the molecules are somewhat difficult to extract. For instance, Mushroom Harvest only uses water (steam) for their extraction, but alcohol is also necessary to get all the actives.

If you really need all the active ingredients but don't want to spend a lot, I would buy bulk unextracted powder of both the fruiting bodies and the mycelium. No extraction means you're guaranteed to get all the active ingredients, and it will probably cost less. Healthy Village and Mushroom Man have bulk fruit bodies, and Myco Essentials and MRL have bulk mycelium. The mycelium products are more expensive by weight, so it may make more sense to take those every other day, etc. depending on your budget.

It may also make sense to take breaks from LM occasionally, as well. NGF interacts with receptors, so it may be subject to tolerance in much the same way as other drugs.


Swanson and New Chapter work well and are priced right.


Just FYI, the bulk sources of FB I just posted are 3-4x cheaper than Swanson's capsule product, by weight.


in your post you indicate that steam extraction method is the same as water extraction. my understanding is that they are in fact different. the steam activation process used by mushroomharvest.com for example is purported to not extract anything from the raw powder, but only to add heat in order to increase bio-availability of the polysaccharides

see below for information on steam process:


"Our products are steam extracts, which is a mechanical method of
extraction. This proprietary process allows us to break the beta-glucans
off the cell walls making them bio-available. At the same time we
maintain and make available many the myriad of other constituents such as
triterpenes and antioxidants.

Hot water extracts will isolate the beta-glucans, but tend to lose many of
the other constituents, such as antioxidants and glyconutrients. In this
process the hot water extraction breaks some of the beta-glucans off the
cell wall, but not even close to all of them. Then the rest of the
mushroom, along with all the beneficial constituents still a part of the
mushroom, are thrown away.

Alcohol extracts can help draw out the di- and tri-terpenes, sterols as
well as other alcohol soluble constituents. The alcohol extraction method
results in a dilution of the original concentration of these compounds
that are in the mushroom, although it does increase the bioavailability of
these compounds. The beta-glucans and other beneficial polysaccharides are
not extracted whatsoever.

We don't make extracts focusing on one constituent - the majority of the
mushroom extracts out there are mostly composed of beta-glucans (also
referred to as polysaccharides on many labels). There are so many
different types of beneficial constituents in mushrooms in addition to
beta-glucans. We made the effort to have the ability to make steam
extracts of whole mushroom powders, so we could produce mushroom powders
that are both bioavailable and have the full range of medicinal benefits
that mushrooms have to offer. The triterpenes are responsible for the
cholesterol reduction, blood pressure reduction, allergy and asthma
relief, anti-inflammatory properties, etc.


Thank you,

Hunter
"
Also (2nd email, with text formatting issues):
"Mushroom Harvest medicinal mushroom powders are organically grown in a
manner exceeding organic standards to provide the highest quality product
possible. They are rich in 1,3 β-D and 1,6 β-D glucans,
glycoproteins, arabinoxylans, triterpenes, ergosterol and antioxidants.
The mushrooms and mycelium are grown on a certified organic substrate
with GMP’s, HACCP procedures, SSOP’s and with guaranteed P-values . The
mushrooms and mycelium are dried to a moisture level below 10% and are
ground to a fineness of 200 – 500 microns. The mushroom powders are then
activated by steam extraction to make the medicinal constituents readily
bio-available for maximum potency. Each lot is sent to an analytical lab
for microbial testing before it is cleared for shipping. Our product
requires no further processing on your part.



however in your post you may have been referring to a different extraction process called a hot water steam extraction. which i assume is different from that described above. this process comprises:

"Hello !

The mushrooms and mycelium are dried to a moisture level below 10% and are ground to a fineness of 200 - 500 microns. The mushroom powders are then activated by hot water steam extraction (solvent free) to make the medicinal constituents readily bio-available for maximum potency. All of our mushroom extracts have a minium beta-glucan content of 20 %
Let me know if you have any more questions.


Bryan Warman
Fungi Health "


Edited by arboles, 24 January 2014 - 03:32 AM.

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#281 Ark

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Posted 27 January 2014 - 03:20 PM

Attached File  1382047_584812398234315_1703784682_n.jpg   33.59KB   13 downloads

So taking into consideration the slight cancer concern, my intuition is to dose on a one week on/one week off schedule, maybe after a four week 'attack' phase. Thoughts?


So I have spent most of the morning reading about NGF, BDNF, interaction with cancers and supplements/nutrients. I'm not convinced that there is an actual increase in getting any form of cancer from boosting NGF/BDNF by itself. Let me try to breakdown what I've manage to gather.

In cancer tumors elevated levels of NGF has been found and is known to be one of the factors that benefit the tumor in it's growth. Medication suppressing NGF in this case can be benificial for the treatment of the growth of the tumor. NGF is something that is naturally increased in areas where there is inflammation in order to help the body to repair the area. Inflammation is something that is the effect of all age related damage and diseases. In cancer models NFG is malfunctioning since the body can not separate the mutated cells from healthy ones, hence cancers cells growth and survivability is also enhanced since the body is repairing it. This is my understanding of what goes on with NGF in a cancer model.

There is a great article here that explains the real effect of antidepressants in the brain/body and also talks about BDNF in repairing inflammation in the brain (all backed with studies):

http://www.wellnessr...arly_mortality/

From looking at research on Lion's Mane the mushroom does increase NGF/BDNF levels. There is a bunch of other things that work on NGF/BDNF as well including common nutrients like blueberries and cucumin. Lion's Mane is proven anti-inflammatory and with other cancer benefits so the notion that it would increase risk for cancer sounds highly improbable to me. There is no studies that show anything like this with Lion's Mane and either with other natural NGF/BDNF modulators that I have been able to find. NGF/BDNF does not cause any cells to mutate into cancer cells, it might however not be beneficial if you already have cancer.

And to finish it all off, exercise has been shown to increase NFG and BDNF levels as well. Does that mean exercise causes cancer? No... There is a lot more to this than that. My personal opinion is that it's not probable and I will be adding Lion's Mane to my stack in the future.

Some more interesting stuff here on mental health and BDNF: http://samsnyder.com...ncreasing-bdnf/

Medications:
1. Ketamine use, which has rapid antidepressant properties, is associated with elevated levels of BDNF. (Link)
2. Memantine, which has antidepressant properties, elevates levels of BDNF. (Link)
3. Agomelatine increases hippocampal BDNF and has antidepressant properties. (Link)
4. Riluzole restores hippocampal BDNF expression and has antidepressant properties. (Link)
5. Escitalopram is an antidepressant that reverses BDNF deficits. (Link)
6. Atypical antipsychotics increase BDNF levels and have antidepressant effects. (Link)
7. Venlafaxine is an antidepressant that increases BDNF levels. (Link)
8. Olanzapine increases BDNF levels and augments antidepressant treatment. (Link)
9. Lithium upregulates BDNF and treats bipolar disorder. (Link)
10. Sertraline is an antidepressant that increases BDNF. (Link)
11. Risperidone increases BDNF levels and augments antidepressant treatment. (Link)
12. Imipramine is an antidepressant that up-regulates BDNF expression. (Link)
13. Mirtazapine is an antidepressant that increases BDNF gene expression. (Link)
14. Metyrapone enhances BDNF gene expression and has antidepressant properties. (Link)
15. Rolipram normalizes BDNF levels and has antidepressant properties. (Link)
Other Psychiatric Treatments:
1. Repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation increases BDNF levels and has antidepressant effects. (Link)
2. Electroconvulsive therapy elevates BDNF levels and has antidepressant effects. (Link)
3. Vagal nerve stimulation activates BDNF receptors and treats depression. (Link)
Food and Lifestyle:
1. A Mediterranean diet increases BDNF levels in depressed patients. (Link)
2. Green odor elevates BDNF and has antidepressant properties. (Link)
3. Music enhances BDNF levels and improves mood. (Link)
4. Alpha-linolenic acid increases BDNF and reduces depressive behavior. (Link)
Supplements:
1. Fish oil has antidepressant effects that involve BDNF. (Link)
2. Ginsenoside prevents a stress-induced reduction in BDNF levels. (Link)
3. Hyperoside has antidepressant properties and elevates BDNF expression. (Link)
4. Magnolol restores BDNF expression and has antidepressant effects. (Link)
5. Curcumin reverses a decrease in BDNF levels and produces an antidepressant effect. (Link)
6. Zinc increases the BDNF mRNA level and has antidepressant effects. (Link)
7. Beta-alanine increases BDNF concentration and has anti-anxiety properties. (Link)
8. Flavonols enhance BDNF expression and have antidepressant properties. (Link)
9. Suyu-Jiaonang attenuates a reduction in BDNF and has antidepressant properties. (Link)
10. Ferulic acid increases BDNF mRNA and ameliorates stress-induced depressive behavior. (Link)
11. Nicotine increases BDNF levels and has antidepressant properties. (Link)
12. Polygala tenuifolia increases BDNF expression and has antidepressant effects. (Link)
13. Xiaoyaosan reverses decreases in BDNF and has antidepressant effects. (Link)
14. Piperine reverses the reduction in BDNF and has antidepressant properties. (Link)
15. Danzhi Xiaoyao powder increases BDNF levels and reduces depressive symptoms. (Link)
16. Ginkgo biloba extract increases BDNF expression and reduces the effects of stress. (Link)
17. Eugenol has antidepressant activity and induces BDNF. (Link)


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#282 Nootropic Cat

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Posted 28 January 2014 - 10:08 AM

Thanks for that post, _alex_, I only just got around to noticing it.

#283 _alex_

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Posted 29 January 2014 - 07:25 AM

Attached File  1382047_584812398234315_1703784682_n.jpg   33.59KB   13 downloads


Haha thanks man, just what I needed :cool:

Edited by _alex_, 29 January 2014 - 07:35 AM.


#284 Jochen

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Posted 05 February 2014 - 10:40 AM

great thread and thanks Alex for your post.

Looking into LM as well ... really lots of rabbit holes here :-)

#285 aphex

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Posted 16 March 2014 - 07:37 PM

I found a possible negative aspect of Lion's Mane / NGF...
I've been taking it for a few months now and stopped taking it. (Both mycelium and fruiting body, each alone or combined,)
It definetely increased my emotional memory, overall memory, resilience and well-being, primary my sensual/peripheral sensibility: hearing, vision, touching, smelling.

The mycelium from foodforconsciousness (cannot post links) was the best I think, I could use it as a stress relief in the evening and to be able to absorb more information during my evening activities.
The activated fruiting body from mushroomharvest was more intense and not so comfortable. While the mycelium needed a few days to have the effect on vision, it took just about a part of a day or a night to let me notice an obvious difference in vision. I did not notice a the itching with the mycelium but with the fruiting body, so I concluded that the NGF effect is stronger then.

Now the bad sides:
I think it was too subtle with the mycelium but the fruiting body increased my OCD as fast as it increased my vision and after a research I did, I found out that elevated levels of NGF and lowered levels of BDNF correlate with the severity of OCD. It's one recent study out there (cannot post links) that also says that this is just correlation and does not necessary display a cause.
Further research led me to the link between NGF and Acetylcholine (ACh) and the link between BDNF and serotonin. Easily you can say that NGF is the important neurotrophin for cholinergic fibers while BDNF is relevant for serotonergic fibers. (Look up the MoA of SSRIs). It is also known that elevated levels of ACh aggravate OCD symptoms and hightened levels of serotonin help OCD/Anxiety.
So it makes sense that Lion's Mane made feel more OCD and more anxious (something feels wrong).
That's why I focus more on BDNF right now (Gotu Kola, Ashwagandha, Curcumin and soon NSI-189), NGF seems to be the wrong neurotrophin for me and surely others with OCD. (I've also read a link between OCD/Anxiety/Depression and ACh/NGF/Lion's Mane) somewhere on this forum.

Edited by aphex, 16 March 2014 - 07:38 PM.

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#286 Flex

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Posted 16 March 2014 - 10:14 PM

Consider that Lionsmane is also a agonist of kappa opioid receptors.

Curiously I can better fall asleep on it, but wake up 1h earlier.

#287 yborcity

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Posted 15 December 2014 - 09:13 AM

hello guys and gals,

Concerning the carnitine compounds, i know alcar has ngf-growth related properties, but what about other form like fumarate or l-tartrate, are there any

carnitine compounds that would be best in that matter?

What about coconut oil and mct oil?

According to wikipedia, huperzine A is an herb alkaloid that seems to boost ngf, besides the vivid dreams experience and is also acts on acetylcholine at some point.



#288 DonManley

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Posted 17 February 2015 - 03:42 PM

hello guys and gals,

Concerning the carnitine compounds, i know alcar has ngf-growth related properties, but what about other form like fumarate or l-tartrate, are there any

carnitine compounds that would be best in that matter?

What about coconut oil and mct oil?

According to wikipedia, huperzine A is an herb alkaloid that seems to boost ngf, besides the vivid dreams experience and is also acts on acetylcholine at some point.

 

The theory / hypothesis behind coconut oil / MCT is that it works by preventing the brain from starving of energy (which has negative effects on NGF). If you have insulin resistance in the brain, then MCTs will provide  an alternative fuel, which the brain can use as "a backup generator in case there is the main power failure":

 

"MCTs are converted in the liver into ketones, which can be used by the brain as fuel; they are more immediate source of energy than other fats and are not as readily stored as body fat. Ketones can provide energy to cells without the need for insulin, the hormone the body relies on to get glucose from the blood into cells. The theory behind coconut oil’s potential use in AD is that ketones might provide an alternative energy source for brain cells that have lost their ability to use glucose."

 

 

The "TL; DR;" version above pretty much summarizes the logic behind it. But if you want more info, Steve Fowkes, who has done a lot of research on the subject of cognitive enchancement, talks a lot about it in great detail. Here is one of his latest videos on the subject: Reversing Alzheimer's Disease

 

 

Consuming MCTs is like an insurance policy - if your brain won't get enough glucose, it will be able to get energy from ketone bodies.


Edited by DonManley, 17 February 2015 - 03:54 PM.

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#289 yborcity

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Posted 18 February 2015 - 11:24 AM

thank for the input, DonManley, i am also a huge fan of laurid acid & coconut oil. :cool:



#290 mrs

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Posted 26 June 2017 - 12:38 PM

Hello,

 

Sorry to revive this old thread, but its directly relate to this post.

 

Lion's Mane may not be a good idea for people with central nervous system tumors (even though it seems to be beneficial for other types of cancer):

1 - If you're taking mTor inhibitors, because Lion's Mane upregulates mTor, and some of the most promising glioma drugs are mTor inhibitors (rapamicyn and rapalogs being some of them)

2 - Lion's Mane promotes neurite growth in several types of cancerous cells

 

Sources (I can supply full text in PDF if anybody needs them, forum didn't allow the upload because it was too big):

https://www.ncbi.nlm...les/PMC5323879/ (full text)

https://www.ncbi.nlm...pubmed/24266378 (abstract)

https://www.ncbi.nlm...) from Malaysia (abstract)

 

Please correct me if I'm missing something.

 

Thanks,

 

Mike

 

 

So taking into consideration the slight cancer concern, my intuition is to dose on a one week on/one week off schedule, maybe after a four week 'attack' phase. Thoughts?


So I have spent most of the morning reading about NGF, BDNF, interaction with cancers and supplements/nutrients. I'm not convinced that there is an actual increase in getting any form of cancer from boosting NGF/BDNF by itself. Let me try to breakdown what I've manage to gather.

In cancer tumors elevated levels of NGF has been found and is known to be one of the factors that benefit the tumor in it's growth. Medication suppressing NGF in this case can be benificial for the treatment of the growth of the tumor. NGF is something that is naturally increased in areas where there is inflammation in order to help the body to repair the area. Inflammation is something that is the effect of all age related damage and diseases. In cancer models NFG is malfunctioning since the body can not separate the mutated cells from healthy ones, hence cancers cells growth and survivability is also enhanced since the body is repairing it. This is my understanding of what goes on with NGF in a cancer model.

There is a great article here that explains the real effect of antidepressants in the brain/body and also talks about BDNF in repairing inflammation in the brain (all backed with studies):

http://www.wellnessr...arly_mortality/

From looking at research on Lion's Mane the mushroom does increase NGF/BDNF levels. There is a bunch of other things that work on NGF/BDNF as well including common nutrients like blueberries and cucumin. Lion's Mane is proven anti-inflammatory and with other cancer benefits so the notion that it would increase risk for cancer sounds highly improbable to me. There is no studies that show anything like this with Lion's Mane and either with other natural NGF/BDNF modulators that I have been able to find. NGF/BDNF does not cause any cells to mutate into cancer cells, it might however not be beneficial if you already have cancer.

And to finish it all off, exercise has been shown to increase NFG and BDNF levels as well. Does that mean exercise causes cancer? No... There is a lot more to this than that. My personal opinion is that it's not probable and I will be adding Lion's Mane to my stack in the future.

Some more interesting stuff here on mental health and BDNF: http://samsnyder.com...increasing-bdnf

 

 

 

 


 



#291 gamesguru

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Posted 26 June 2017 - 09:56 PM

I'm not convinced that there is an actual increase in getting any form of cancer from boosting NGF/BDNF by itself.


Alright sarge you have a point. But the real question then becomes, can it cause cancer when eaten alongside those frosted prezels everyone seems to like? The world may never know..

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#292 Oakman

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Posted 27 June 2017 - 07:59 PM

There seems to be a number of pros and quite a few cons to LM, but are all effects dose dependent? By that I mean, to minimize the possible negatives, can we also lower the dose? Is there some cutoff, where it becomes useless?

 

I realize the LM effects may not be so noticeable, but rather accrue over time with continuous use in a safer manner. And then the bad things (like encouraging cancers) may not rear their head that way.

 

 My LM powder says take 2 (4 grams to start) of their whole fruit/mycelial biomass. Yet I see capsules that contain 300-500mg LM, sometimes mixed with Reishi.  Whose dosing recommendation is superior long term? I encapsulate my own product, so I could easily make any mixture as a capsule or just mix LM with some liquid as the directions suggest.



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