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Where do I begin?


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#1 AmagicalFishy

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Posted 17 March 2010 - 04:34 PM


Hello, folks.

Currently, I'm in my 1st year of college. I plan to get my bachelor's in molecular biology, and my doctorate in biogerontology. I've already had a few ideas (discussions, literary searches, etc.) regarding some independant research proposals (and possible doctoral thesis), but, as you might be able to tell, my being pretty ignorant in this subject has makes things rather difficult.

As many of you, I hope to extend human longevity (particularly my own ;)), but I don't wish to stagnate for years in the system of formal schooling. My first goal, then, is to genuinely learn, but it seems as if there are so many things to learn about, I would stretch myself too thinly without having some kind of solid foundation upon which to begin.

Is there a good place you guys suggest I start?

[Also, don't mind the typo in the subtitle; I do enough. :)]

Edited by AmagicalFishy, 17 March 2010 - 04:37 PM.


#2 AmagicalFishy

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Posted 18 March 2010 - 03:33 AM

To anyone who had an answer (if that's anyone, hah): I've a particular subject in mind now, but feel free to post any interesting fields anyway. There's never a thing as too much learning.

Edited by AmagicalFishy, 18 March 2010 - 03:33 AM.


#3 brokenportal

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Posted 18 March 2010 - 05:59 AM

I could have sworn I posted a link to the sens sub forums here at imminst. Im too tired to dig them up now. If you look through the forums here youll see it. If I were you I would read through Ending Aging, and a bunch of gerontology journals and go from there. You can get a discount to the Rejuvenation Journal here at imminst. If your interested in that then PM Mind.

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#4 brokenportal

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Posted 18 March 2010 - 02:51 PM

Heres some SENS and Methuselah Foundations discussions:

http://www.imminst.o...selah-f304.html

Thats where the most promising direct research toward ending aging is going on. There is more though of course. If you ask around in there you will find more answers, and then youll find leads in Journals like this:

http://www.imminst.o...o...31084&st=20

#5 khakiman

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Posted 18 March 2010 - 03:17 PM

no need for school, just patiently wait for the nano age and pray the economy survives and/or we dont get hit with a massive solar flare.

#6 David V

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Posted 29 March 2010 - 10:56 PM

Hello, folks.

Currently, I'm in my 1st year of college. I plan to get my bachelor's in molecular biology, and my doctorate in biogerontology. I've already had a few ideas (discussions, literary searches, etc.) regarding some independant research proposals (and possible doctoral thesis), but, as you might be able to tell, my being pretty ignorant in this subject has makes things rather difficult.

As many of you, I hope to extend human longevity (particularly my own ;)), but I don't wish to stagnate for years in the system of formal schooling. My first goal, then, is to genuinely learn, but it seems as if there are so many things to learn about, I would stretch myself too thinly without having some kind of solid foundation upon which to begin.

Is there a good place you guys suggest I start?

[Also, don't mind the typo in the subtitle; I do enough. :)]



Perhaps you should consider working with the SENSAI... www.sens.org/ai

That would be an excellent way to get some real-world experience and network connections while you're still in school. There might also be ways for you to get funding if you can do some research work @ your school. Take a look @ the info and get in touch if you need anything.

Cheers,

David V.
Communications Officer SENSFAI
dvorriccelli (at) gmail

#7 David V

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Posted 29 March 2010 - 10:56 PM

no need for school, just patiently wait for the nano age and pray the economy survives and/or we dont get hit with a massive solar flare.



lulz. So true ;) But that's the 'freerider' problem in a nutshell.

#8 lunarsolarpower

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Posted 30 March 2010 - 07:14 AM

no need for school, just patiently wait for the nano age and pray the economy survives and/or we dont get hit with a massive solar flare.



lulz. So true :) But that's the 'freerider' problem in a nutshell.


You guys seriously don't want to have any part in building the future? I can't imagine sitting this game out.

#9 Alex Libman

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Posted 30 March 2010 - 11:18 AM

Some things to consider:

  • A sufficiently intelligent person would usually be able to make a greater contribution to any field of endeavor by making lots of money and using it to hire lots of people to contribute to this field than by engaging in that field directly. Maybe the human economy isn't ready to allocate a lot of capital to molecular biology just yet, for example, but it has a perceived shortage of certain widgets or whatnot by selling which you can become a billionaire and fund your own research university.
  • No matter how brilliant, any scientific achievement can be destroyed or subverted through human irrationality. Socialized medicine, for example, created an economic environment where an increase in human longevity is the very last thing the governments would want, especially if everyone would be "entitled" to it equally! Scientific advancement beyond a certain point is downright impossible without being preceded by sufficient free market reforms to make that research legal and economically sustainable.

That isn't to say that business and politics are more important than science, but the accomplishment of our goals will take all three.

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#10 David V

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Posted 30 March 2010 - 07:23 PM

Suspect that a *sufficiently* intelligent person might take that track. But perhaps at some point afterwards the whole group will recognize that they can work more effectively together than individually.


Some things to consider:

  • A sufficiently intelligent person would usually be able to make a greater contribution to any field of endeavor by making lots of money and using it to hire lots of people to contribute to this field than by engaging in that field directly. Maybe the human economy isn't ready to allocate a lot of capital to molecular biology just yet, for example, but it has a perceived shortage of certain widgets or whatnot by selling which you can become a billionaire and fund your own research university.
  • No matter how brilliant, any scientific achievement can be destroyed or subverted through human irrationality. Socialized medicine, for example, created an economic environment where an increase in human longevity is the very last thing the governments would want, especially if everyone would be "entitled" to it equally! Scientific advancement beyond a certain point is downright impossible without being preceded by sufficient free market reforms to make that research legal and economically sustainable.

That isn't to say that business and politics are more important than science, but the accomplishment of our goals will take all three.



#11 niner

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Posted 30 March 2010 - 07:43 PM

No matter how brilliant, any scientific achievement can be destroyed or subverted through human irrationality. Socialized medicine, for example, created an economic environment where an increase in human longevity is the very last thing the governments would want, especially if everyone would be "entitled" to it equally! Scientific advancement beyond a certain point is downright impossible without being preceded by sufficient free market reforms to make that research legal and economically sustainable.

Have you ever read S. Jay Olshansky's description of the Longevity Dividend? Healthier aging saves money for governments rather than costing them money. It would be in the government's interest for us to age more slowly and maintain our health longer.

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#12 Alex Libman

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Posted 31 March 2010 - 11:55 AM

Have you ever read S. Jay Olshansky's description of the Longevity Dividend? Healthier aging saves money for governments rather than costing them money. It would be in the government's interest for us to age more slowly and maintain our health longer.


That assumes that voters and governments can act constructively, which they never have and never will because the former is interested in unearned handouts and the latter in unearned power. They still can't even figure out how to deal with "sticky wages" without inflating away much of our economic growth!




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