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Burj Khalifa


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#1 Mind

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Posted 22 March 2010 - 05:48 PM


I was just wondering if anyone has been to the Burj Khalifa yet? Is it as impressive up close as it is in pictures? Has anyone been to the top? Got any pictures?

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#2 ilia

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Posted 07 April 2010 - 10:49 AM

The Burj Khalifa tower is truly amazing. Its construction showed the world that the United Arab Emirates have incredible means for technological development.
The total cost for the Burj Khalifa tower project was about US$1.5 billion; and for the entire new "Downtown Dubai", US$20 billion, including the tower (828 meter high) and the world’ largest artificial island (14 kilometer long).

I have been wondering whether the royalty of the United Arab Emirates or Saudi Arabia will ever be willing to invest into life-extension research. For example, Janan Harb, wife of the late King Fahd of Saudi Arabia, is known to be very much into anti-aging. But will they ever spare a couple of millions for longevity research? This could really help ;)

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Edited by ilia, 07 April 2010 - 01:54 PM.


#3 DukeNukem

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Posted 07 April 2010 - 06:51 PM

It looks like a modern day Tower of Babel. Why didn't God stop it from being completed?! lol

Seriously, though, I plan on going there in the next 12 months. Can't wait.

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#4 medicineman

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Posted 25 July 2010 - 03:46 PM

Yes it is amazing...... Speaking of Dubai, it is an amazing place all together, if you have money. If not, then it is truly the definition of hell....

btw just for useless trivia,,, burj means tower, and khalifa is the current Bahrain ruling dynasty. In middle eastern countries, streets, roads and towers, are usually named after Islamic heroes, Islamic scientists of the middle ages, princes and Sheiks, HUGE entrepreneurs who have shaped the country, or past Spanish arabian towns. For example, in almost every arab country, there is a town known as Cordoba, Sevilla, Granada, etc (I guess to remind them of some long lost glory)....or streets and hospitals named after Averroes and Avicenna, the muslim (not very conventional muslim) middle age thinkers (once again to remind them of some long lost glory, although most of these scientists were discriminated against, harrassed, etc.), or streets named after some Sheikh or ruler...... well you get the point. Funny thing is the middle age medic,Al Razi, who has his name tagged after many hospitals all over muslim countries was actually a vicious critic of islam and a card carrying atheist, but he is touted here as a muslim hero. anyways, im going off in a tangent.

PS. In Kuwait, Street of Baghdad was temporarily renamed Bush Street, as gratitude for the Gulf war, but that didnt go down well, so its Baghdad street again.

sorry about this rant, but I think some people might find it interesting....

Edited by medicineman, 25 July 2010 - 04:03 PM.


#5 ilia

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Posted 25 July 2010 - 05:15 PM

Hi, Medicineman. It is great to see you in this subforum! And thanks for the info. I have indeed often thought that Al Razi, Al Biruni, Al Jabir were great Islamic thinkers that were highly positive about the idea of radical life-extension. And hence there is a strong tradition of life-extensionism in Islamic culture.

Something tells me that you are not a native of Kuwait :) But would you be willing to tell about the general attitude to the idea of life extension in that country. Is Al Razi’s legacy still alive? :)

#6 medicineman

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Posted 25 July 2010 - 09:27 PM

Hi, Medicineman. It is great to see you in this subforum! And thanks for the info. I have indeed often thought that Al Razi, Al Biruni, Al Jabir were great Islamic thinkers that were highly positive about the idea of radical life-extension. And hence there is a strong tradition of life-extensionism in Islamic culture.

Something tells me that you are not a native of Kuwait :) But would you be willing to tell about the general attitude to the idea of life extension in that country. Is Al Razi's legacy still alive? :)


To be honest, life extension in Kuwait, or any Islamic country is bleak, and the main reason being a strong belief in predestination. Its a shame really. These thinkers were not conventional muslims, and in Al-Razis case, he was a card carrying atheist, who believed the power of medicine to be above anything religion or philosophy can provide. Most of these thinkers had their origins in Persia, and thus they tend to deviate away from mainstream hardcore Islamic determinism, and more towards gnosticism, which IMO was great, since without an all knowing all seeing deity, people had more control of things in life, and this would explain the great 'faith' some of these thinkers had in science and medicine.

And to answer your question. It is unfortunate that these thinkers are only names, tossed around by arabs (and persians, although Iran isn't doing too bad in the scientific establishment) in order to provide relief from the downward spiral muslim thought has taken since the Granada massacre.

btw I am a mixture of arab and persian descent, lived 10 years in Kuwait, 9 in the states, and 6 in Ireland...... and nice to meet you too friend.

#7 ilia

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Posted 26 July 2010 - 02:36 PM

To be honest, life extension in Kuwait, or any Islamic country is bleak, and the main reason being a strong belief in predestination. Its a shame really. These thinkers were not conventional muslims, and in Al-Razis case, he was a card carrying atheist, who believed the power of medicine to be above anything religion or philosophy can provide. Most of these thinkers had their origins in Persia, and thus they tend to deviate away from mainstream hardcore Islamic determinism, and more towards gnosticism, which IMO was great, since without an all knowing all seeing deity, people had more control of things in life, and this would explain the great 'faith' some of these thinkers had in science and medicine.

And to answer your question. It is unfortunate that these thinkers are only names, tossed around by arabs (and persians, although Iran isn't doing too bad in the scientific establishment) in order to provide relief from the downward spiral muslim thought has taken since the Granada massacre.


Just found this quote: “There is no such age fixed for human life the transgression of which would be impossible. …. All the above observations in the medical and biological sciences make it possible for human beings to expect to discover the secret of longevity and overcome old age one day. Moreover, it has prompted them to continue their research until the goal is reached. There is hope that scientific research into understanding the mystery of longevity will also lead to uncovering the secret of the long life of the Qa'im [al-Mahdi] from the Family of the Prophet (peace be upon him and his progeny). Let us hope that day will come soon.”

These are the words of Dr. Abu Turab Nafisi, Professor and Chair of the School of Medicine, University of Isfahan, and they appear in Ayatollah Ibrahim Amini, in the chapter “The Research About Longeivty” in “Al-Imam al-Mahdi, The Just Leader of Humanity”

http://www.al-islam....ontl/Chap-9.htm

The translation dates 1996. If one looks closely at that chapter, most of the data cited are from the 1930s-1940s. So apparently the book is much older. Still the fact that it was recently translated (at the request of Ayatollah Amini himself) and published in “Al-Islam” is very encouraging. It shows that the pursuit of life extension has no national and religious boundaries. Imho, if, in the name of Al-Mahdi, people wish to prolong human life, there can be no more blessed development. But perhaps you are right, and the idea is far from mainstream Islam (as it is far from mainstream Christianity, Judaism or even Atheism). But still it gives great hope. I wish I knew more examples like that.

Edited by ilia, 31 July 2010 - 08:41 AM.


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#8 Eric Raum

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Posted 18 August 2013 - 04:43 AM

I have been there. Quite impressive, and is a great feature of the Dubai skyline.




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