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Nicotine patch decreases HDL


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8 replies to this topic

#1 health_nutty

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Posted 14 January 2011 - 05:52 PM


http://www.ncbi.nlm....pubmed/10938215

RESULTS: HDL-C, HDL(2)-C, and HDL(3)-C levels were significantly lower in smokers when compared with controls. These differences were sustained during the initial 35 days when using the patch. Over the following 42 days, however, these lipoproteins normalized to values similar to those of control subjects. Females who quit smoking gained 2.1 kg after the patch was removed.

CONCLUSIONS: It was concluded that nicotine as administered by the transdermal nicotine patch inhibits normalization of HDL-C, HDL(2)-C, and HDL(3)-C in those who have quit smoking. Removal of the patch results in normalization of these lipoproteins. The patch appeared to prevent weight gain among female subjects.

#2 health_nutty

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Posted 14 January 2011 - 05:54 PM

Another one:

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Nicotine tied to Alzheimer's risk

* 12:44 14 April 2010 by Wendy Zukerman
* For similar stories, visit the Mental Health and Drugs and Alcohol Topic Guides

Smoking could predispose people to dementia, not protect them as has been suggested in the past. This is the conclusion from lab experiments in which rats with brain plaques developed further symptoms of Alzheimer's when given nicotine.

In Alzheimer's disease, the brain becomes riddled with amyloid protein plaques and tangles of tau proteins. Low doses of nicotine have been shown to reduce the number of plaques in rats, but till now little was known about the effect of nicotine on the protein tangles.

To find out, Yan-Jiang Wang's team at the Third Military Medical University in Chongqing, China, injected amyloid plaques into the brains of healthy rats and gave some the equivalent of a smoker's daily dose of nicotine for two weeks, while others received nothing.

All the rats showed early signs of tau tangles and had difficulty navigating a maze, but the rats that were on nicotine did worse than those that were not.
Smokers take note

Jürgen Goetz, of the Brain and Mind Research Institute at the University of Sydney, Australia, says the results are likely to have implications for humans.

Some previous studies, many of them funded by tobacco companies, have indicated that smokers are less likely to develop Alzheimer's. But when a team of researchers re-examined 43 studies earlier this year, discounting the industry-funded ones, they concluded that smoking actually increases the risk of Alzheimer's
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#3 health_nutty

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Posted 14 January 2011 - 05:55 PM

A lot of people correctly argued that most of the negative side effects of tobacco do no occur with nicotine in isolation. I just wanted to point out some of the side effects that do remain.

#4 health_nutty

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Posted 18 January 2011 - 07:55 PM

No comments from the nicotine patch crowd? Or have people moved on to more promising noots?

#5 kikai93

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Posted 18 January 2011 - 08:09 PM

No comments from the nicotine patch crowd? Or have people moved on to more promising noots?


I'm not part of the nicotine patch crowd, but I see no reason to think that occasional use of nicotine in isolation would be an issue, any more than occasional use of alcohol in isolation would be an issue.
That said, it's been known to me (and so I assume others) for some time that chronic use of nicotine is bad juju for your brain.

#6 aLurker

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Posted 18 January 2011 - 08:50 PM

No comments from the nicotine patch crowd? Or have people moved on to more promising noots?

I felt like I didn't have much to say when I read this topic so I just upvoted and moved on but since you asked I'll post a brief comment:

Thank you very much for bringing this to my attention. Yeah I've moved on and I'm currently chasing other shiny rainbows. Mostly since the honeymoon with nicotine wasn't sustainable. I might use nicotine occasionally when there is an emergency but the tolerance issue effectively stops me from the temptation of using it too often anyway. If it remained as effective as when I started I would however have a serious conundrum although I consider my long-term mental health to be very important so I would probably opt against long-term use and try to find other solutions either way.

I wonder what mechanisms are involved here. I might have to read the full study later. If it is related to vascular dementia I'd very much like to know how other stims (particularly those with vascular effects) compare here. Not many similar studies are done and I think that's very disheartening. Nicotine's bad reputation at least makes people study the risks. We've known for a long time now that nicotine has a dark side to it, an interesting nail in the coffin though.

Edited by aLurker, 18 January 2011 - 09:00 PM.


#7 Pittguy578

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Posted 19 January 2011 - 06:43 AM

Shoot..I am going to stop chewing nictoine gum. I was not a smoker, but I started chewing it because I started to get depressed and burned out at work and it did enable me to concentrate..
However, I had a photographic memory before. I have noticed some "strange" things with my memory. I thought it was just in my head..
Going to stop cold turkey tomorrow.

#8 VibrantLife

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Posted 10 June 2011 - 07:33 AM

Thanks for posting about the downsides of nicotine. I've experienced positive results with short-term use (maybe a few times a week) in combination with caffeine and wellbutrin. Of course, I've noticed a tolerance build up too. The risks mentioned here deter me from long-term use, although I'll occasionally use it again in the future.

I was wondering if there were any other threads in the forums that addressed the downsides of nicotine. I couldn't find any, so I thought I'd ask.

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#9 shaggy

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Posted 10 June 2011 - 09:13 PM

No comments from the nicotine patch crowd? Or have people moved on to more promising noots?


I'm not part of the nicotine patch crowd, but I see no reason to think that occasional use of nicotine in isolation would be an issue, any more than occasional use of alcohol in isolation would be an issue.
That said, it's been known to me (and so I assume others) for some time that chronic use of nicotine is bad juju for your brain.


Seems a poor argument to me. Particularly when relating to HDL cholesterol. Alcohol, red wine in particular increases HDL... And alcohol in moderation has been shown to imcrease longevity....No contest!

Edited by shaggy, 10 June 2011 - 09:26 PM.





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