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Root Canals = Evil?


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#1 thedevinroy

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Posted 14 July 2011 - 06:31 PM


Focal infections are nowadays considered a very proven theory. One infection in one area of the body can infect another tissue or organ. This also happens with cancer, especially pancreatic cancer.

Dr. Weston Price (1870-1948) was a dentist and a leader in the theory that bacteria of the mouth can spread to other organs. Price was the founder of Research Institute of the National Dental Association which later became the American Dentist Association.

From Wikipedia:

Endodontics and focal infection
Price performed extensive research on pulpless and endodontically treated teeth in support of the theory of focal infection, which at that time held that systemic conditions including complexion, intestinal disorders, anemia among others could be explained by infections in the mouth. This theory also held that infected teeth should therefore be treated by dental extraction, rather than undergo root canals, to limit the risk of more general illness. His research, based on case reports and animal studies performed on rabbits, claimed to show dramatic improvements after the extraction of teeth with non-vital pulps. Price's research fit into a wider body of testimonials in the dental literature of the 1920s, which contributed to the widespread acceptance of the practice of extracting, rather than endodontically treating, infected teeth[20] to the point that despite contentions in 1927 regarding a "faulty bacterial technique" in Price's later 1925 "Dental Infections and related Degenerative Diseases" work[21], Dental Infections, Oral and Systemic was used as a reference in textbooks and diagnosis guides clear into the early to mid 1930s.[22][23]

By the 1930s, the theory of focal infection began to be reexamined, and new research shed doubt on the results of previous studies. A 1935 Journal of the Canadian Dental Association article author would call Price radical while citing his comment in Dental Infections, Oral and Systemic of "continually seeing patients suffering more from the inconvenience and difficulties of mastication and nourishment than they did from the lesions from which their physician or dentist had sought to give them relief" as an example of one of 'the authorities that emphasize my contentions for conservatism' with regards to tooth extraction [24] and one researcher in 1940 noted "practically every investigation dealing with the pulpless teeth made prior to 1936 is invalid in the light of recent studies" and that the research of Price and others suffered from technical limitations and questionable interpretations of the garnered results.[25]

Three years after Price died a special review issue of the Journal of the American Dental Association confirmed the shift of standard of care from extraction back to endodontical dentistry.[26] In terms of more modern research, Price's studies lacked proper control groups, used excessive doses of bacteria, and had bacterial contamination during teeth extraction, leading to experimental biases.[20]

Basically, his studies were squashed because people disbelieved the focal infection theory. Upon discovery of his literature, some modern day PhD's have looked at the link between root canals and ill health claiming that the dead dentin has miles of microtubes where which mutated anerobic (sp?) bacteria can hide, living on very little food, requiring no oxygen... I think of it like the mole people of bacteria. These bacteria are inert to antibacterial treatments for a couple reasons speculated: (1) because they are in such a tight place, circulating antibiotics can't get to it, and/or (2) the strains of bacteria are resistant to antibiotics.

The bacteria just sits there feeding on whatever it can find, releasing it's little toxic waste, and because fillings aren't perfect, it can get out where the filling has shrunk. The bacteria are then suspected to spread to other organs, causing damage in the closest pathways to them. Root canals have been analyzed and found to contain many strains of bacteria from all areas of disease. Now, this is where I draw the line... I don't believe teeth to be the leading cause of every single disease just because every single disease you've had is in your tooth. That's ridiculous.

I have heard some news sources talking about the link between breast cancer and root canals, too. http://naturaldentis...-breast-cancer/

It's talked a little bit on these forums: http://www.longecity...-doing-nothing/ But the guy is basically ignored. He's basically woried that if he gets his teeth extracted and is have to fed powder, he will lose his memory like rats did in this study: http://www.ncbi.nlm..../pubmed/9062693 Haha, I always get a kick out of rats running into walls or around in circles.

From The Root Canal Cover Up: http://educate-yours...up02apr04.shtml

Dr. Price suspected that these infections arose from the teeth. He decided to implant an extracted root-filled tooth under the skin of an animal. He felt that if bacteria were present and carrying illness, their presence in a tooth might offer the same kind of proof physicians found when they injected the bacterial culture to produce disease in an animal. That is exactly what took place. He found that by implanting the root-filled tooth, the disease of the patient was transferred to animals. Whatever disease the patient had, the animal with the extracted tooth under its skin developed the same disease as the patient.

In other words, if the patient had heart disease, the animal developed heart disease. If he had kidney trouble, disease of the kidney was transferred to the animal. If he had a problem in his joints, the animals' joints became similarly involved. The principle held true for the whole spectrum of human ailments. Whatever the disease, the animal would develop that of the patient.


If anyone's concerned why I'm asking, it's that I got a cavity taking up half my tooth, opening up the back of the tooth and down past the gum line. I thought fillings were a lot more than they are... apparently only $100 or so. Anyhow, I was told I might need a root canal. There is no pain in that specific tooth usually, but there is when I pick it or press down inside. I'd rather get a filling, since there's unlikely an abscess.

What you think?

Edited by devinthayer, 14 July 2011 - 06:32 PM.

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#2 JLL

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Posted 14 July 2011 - 07:55 PM

You can get a filling, but it's quite probable that you'll need a root canal eventually if the tooth nerve dies.

That's what happened to me -- I had a deep filling which had to be replaced because a piece fell off, but then the new filling kept hitting the nerve which died in a few weeks. And now I have to do root canal. I'm not a fan of the whole idea of root canal treatments, but I figured it's better than getting the whole tooth pulled out.

#3 maxwatt

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Posted 14 July 2011 - 10:57 PM

dental implant when the root cannot be saved.
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#4 lucid

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Posted 20 August 2011 - 04:18 PM

I recently got a couple of fillings; The dentist said that they were tiny and they would be no problem. Oh boy, that was not the case. He ended up putting in really deep fillings and I was in terrible pain for some weeks afterwards. I was popping 5x ibuprofen a day just so i could eat. It all started when i went into the dentist for a checkup with what I thought were perfectly healthy teeth, weeks later i couldn't eat. Thanks right? So, I went back into the dentist and he did the hot/cold test (which was excruiating); then said that I would need a root canal...

Oh I disagree. Now its possible that my nerve tissue was infected (in which case i really need a root canal); but I don't think so, its likely just the filling aggrevating the nerve. But the pain would be unbearable if I didn't do something. Enter synsodyne. I used to laugh when i walked past this stuff in the store: "Who buys this? Sensitive teeth? Pshh" Well this stuff complete stopped all of the pain. Which as it turns out is a good thing for several reasons. #1 I can eat food without pain. #2 My nerve was so irritated it was causing inflamation all the way down my whole jaw. If my nerve stayed so inflamed i would have lost the nerve eventually.

Since it has now calmed down, i can give it time so that the dentum can push back down the nerve pulp. Once the dentum grows back, I should be good to go, root canal averted.

I got to reading a lot about using ultrasound to regrow teeth. It looked pretty promising years ago. They were in the news then they finished their device: http://en.wikipedia....lsed_ultrasound Then they just disappeared off of the internet and I haven't heard anything about them again. Wiki says you can buy the device in '12, but you can find it online today. Weird no one has tried it and posted results.

At anyrate, I would try to dodge the root canal / crown bullet if possible. But if your pulp has gotten infected, then you are probably screwed. If you don't get a root canal when you need one you could lose a lot of your jaw bone :/

Cheers.

You can get a filling, but it's quite probable that you'll need a root canal eventually if the tooth nerve dies.

That's what happened to me -- I had a deep filling which had to be replaced because a piece fell off, but then the new filling kept hitting the nerve which died in a few weeks. And now I have to do root canal. I'm not a fan of the whole idea of root canal treatments, but I figured it's better than getting the whole tooth pulled out.



#5 lucid

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Posted 03 January 2012 - 02:36 AM

Just want to give anyone that read this an update.

I said no to getting a root canal even though the Doc said that I definitely should. I was in some pretty real pain for a month after the fillings. I mean my pain was so bad and my teeth were so aggrevated by the deep filling that the lymph nodes in my neck really started to swell up to the point where they hurt too!

What got me through all of that was Synsodyne. GOD BLESS IT. Once I started using it, my pain subsided in a few days to very managable levels. I would emphasise that the pain i experienced was from the filling aggrevating my tooth and NOT from tooth decay effecting the nerve of my tooth. Partially knowable since my teeth were 100% fine before the filling.

It has now been 6 months since the fillings and I no longer need to use sensodyne! Hooray! W00T W00t. So i have been taking top notch care of my teeth, brushing 2-3x /day. Flossing daily. Using mouthwash daily. All the stuff i was doing hit and miss before. What actually happened the past 6 months was that my dental pulp thickened and pushed back some of the nerve tissue so that it is no longer aggrevated by the filling. But it takes about 6 months. So yeah, I win.

#6 Deckah

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Posted 07 January 2012 - 10:44 AM

Can always use some clove oil :)

#7 xEva

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Posted 12 January 2012 - 01:12 AM

Root canals are evil. There is a new procedure, developed in Asia, called 3Mix-MP, which is a combination of 3 antibiotics in a carrier of propylene glycol, which showed a superior penetration into dentin. The research showed that a mere removal of the bacteria responsible for the tooth decay with this antibiotic treatment allowed the patients to keep their teeth. In most cases the damaged pulp restored. So far, this procedure is mostly used for children's primary teeth, but the research showed this treatment effective for adults as well.

google 3mix-mp endodontic treatment

At the moment, the situation in the US and Europe is such that it is up to the patient to convince the dentist to use this procedure instead of a traditional root canal, because the dentists have no financial incentive to offer it, especially in the US.

And by the way, in the traditional root canal, they still use diluted bleach as a disinfectant, which is very caustic for the tissues and is not as good a disinfectant as this antibiotic mix. Again, it is up to the patients to educate their dentists and demand the treatments they want.

#8 seivtcho

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Posted 12 January 2012 - 05:38 AM

xEva, therapies, that claim to be better than the standart treatments emerge very often. You can't possibly imagine how much and how different they can be - the 3mix that You have seen, a hudge amount of chemical substances, such as cupral for exampe, devices, that offer to kill microorganisms in the root canals with electricity, lasers, ultrasound, nanoparticles etc, etc. In my oppinion, based on my modest experience I must say, that so far nothing can substitute the perfect standart endodontic treatment, and if a new therapy appears, it needs at least ten years of mass spread usage to proove its worth.

#9 hivemind

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Posted 12 January 2012 - 05:49 AM

Root canals are not evil and the Weston Price nonsense about root canals is not true.

http://faculty.ksu.e...sIngle/ch03.pdf

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#10 Lufega

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Posted 12 January 2012 - 10:06 PM

When in doubt, pull it out ? Amazingly, that works for just about anything. :-D

#11 manic_racetam

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Posted 14 January 2012 - 04:38 AM

When in doubt, pull it out ? Amazingly, that works for just about anything. :-D


Yeah, root canals may be evil, but thankfully I still have four front teeth... which, thanks to the modern marvel of tooth reconstruction science I still have use of.

A 29 year old missing all 4 front teeth! Imagine what my business career and love-life might be!

Imagine living in a world where you have to pay the consequences for all of your decisions... even poor dental hygiene. What a world it must have been 100 years ago.

#12 thedevinroy

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Posted 22 February 2012 - 01:39 AM

Ashwagandha not only rebuilds nerves but also is a pain killer, too. I've had this gaping hole in my tooth, exposing the complete top of my pulp for months now with no pain thanks to Ashwagandha. Too much of the tooth is gone to really save even with a root canal, but I've saved myself from the dentist until dental insurance kicks in. Thank you God for the Ash.

Started with 420mg of 1.5% 2x a day which still gave me slight pain here and there, but when I bought my capsule filler, I got the 7% extract, and I've lost the need for tonics and stimulants during the day (it's a thyroid tonic). I now take about 400mg of the 7% 3x a day. I can go a whole day without it and not suffer anything more than a slight itch since it seems to have a lasting effect.

#13 niner

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Posted 22 February 2012 - 01:52 AM

I've had this gaping hole in my tooth, exposing the complete top of my pulp for months now with no pain thanks to Ashwagandha. Too much of the tooth is gone to really save even with a root canal, but I've saved myself from the dentist until dental insurance kicks in.


Devin, are you sure it's not saveable? It would be a shame to lose a tooth that could be saved; then your alternatives are a hole in your mouth, a false tooth that's attached in some way to the neighboring teeth, or an implant. The implant is the only decent option, but it's expensive and takes a long time to complete. You might want to get a dentist to just look at; maybe there would be a relatively cheap temporary fix.

#14 thedevinroy

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Posted 22 February 2012 - 02:39 AM

I've had this gaping hole in my tooth, exposing the complete top of my pulp for months now with no pain thanks to Ashwagandha. Too much of the tooth is gone to really save even with a root canal, but I've saved myself from the dentist until dental insurance kicks in.


Devin, are you sure it's not saveable? It would be a shame to lose a tooth that could be saved; then your alternatives are a hole in your mouth, a false tooth that's attached in some way to the neighboring teeth, or an implant. The implant is the only decent option, but it's expensive and takes a long time to complete. You might want to get a dentist to just look at; maybe there would be a relatively cheap temporary fix.


The top and the back of the tooth are missing, and the hygienist let me know that the success rate for the amount of decay I have it quite low. I wouldn't mind an implant.

#15 manic_racetam

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Posted 22 February 2012 - 04:26 AM

I've had this gaping hole in my tooth, exposing the complete top of my pulp for months now with no pain thanks to Ashwagandha. Too much of the tooth is gone to really save even with a root canal, but I've saved myself from the dentist until dental insurance kicks in.


Devin, are you sure it's not saveable? It would be a shame to lose a tooth that could be saved; then your alternatives are a hole in your mouth, a false tooth that's attached in some way to the neighboring teeth, or an implant. The implant is the only decent option, but it's expensive and takes a long time to complete. You might want to get a dentist to just look at; maybe there would be a relatively cheap temporary fix.


The top and the back of the tooth are missing, and the hygienist let me know that the success rate for the amount of decay I have it quite low. I wouldn't mind an implant.


I have really weak teeth, and used to have terrible dental hygiene. This resulted in my losing the top and back part of a molar. The tooth just cracked open one day. Then I left it for a year... just the open and exposed nerve oozing infection, for a year. That was terrible. I thought it was over for sure, I had given up hope on the tooth a long time before seeing the dentist.

I finally walked into the dentist office holding my jaw in tears, he shot me full of novicaine and I told him to just pull it out. Surprisingly he said there was no need to pull it. He did a root canal and the pain was gone instantly. He cemented a crown on the little nubbon a week later and I've still got it in the back of my mouth. Still using the shotty stainless steel crown on it, and keep in mind this was all done in China over 5 years ago.

I'm sure those Massachusetts dentists can figure something out ;) Good luck though. Hopefully it's not too late for any of your teeth. With the help of american dental insurance I had about 6,000 bucks worth of work done back in 2008-2009 that saved my smile. Thank god for it or I'd be a denture wearing 29 year old right now LOL

#16 niner

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Posted 22 February 2012 - 04:34 AM

Yeah, I wouldn't go by what the hygienist says. Find a dentist who does a lot of restorations. I bet it could be capped. That is a hell of a lot easier than an implant, and cheaper too. (still pretty damned expensive, particularly with gold) You might be able to get a temporary stainless steel cap; you can run those for years, and they should be pretty cheap. Later when you have some money or killer insurance, you can replace it with a nice porcelain fused metal crown that looks great.

#17 xEva

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Posted 23 February 2012 - 09:18 AM

xEva, therapies, that claim to be better than the standart treatments emerge very often. You can't possibly imagine how much and how different they can be - the 3mix that You have seen, a hudge amount of chemical substances, such as cupral for exampe, devices, that offer to kill microorganisms in the root canals with electricity, lasers, ultrasound, nanoparticles etc, etc. In my oppinion, based on my modest experience I must say, that so far nothing can substitute the perfect standart endodontic treatment, and if a new therapy appears, it needs at least ten years of mass spread usage to proove its worth.


You guys don't seem to understand what this therapy is about. It's been around for more than 20 years --30?-- in Japan. There are papers written about it based on research of adults (it was originally meant for children primary teeth) that spanned more than 10 years (in Indonesia, for example).

Talking about the cost -- it costs not much over the regular filling of the same size. And it works better than the traditional root canal. Because it does not weaken the tooth, like the traditional treatment. Check out this picture:

Posted Image

Before the 3Mix-MP therapy and 5 years later.

Note the remineralization of the tooth and the underlying bone.



Can you hope for this sort of results with the traditional root canal? And at the fraction of the cost? I think not. Google the 3Mix-MP LSTR therapy. And here us Journal of LSTR Therapy
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#18 seivtcho

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Posted 23 February 2012 - 02:28 PM

Actually, such results (as shown on the xrays) can be achieved also with the standart treatment. If You do not believe me, You may go to the faculty of endodontics in the nearest dental university. There the practitioners definately will have simmilar before - after xrays, that show nice healing and a bone remineralisation after standart endodontic treatment.
Many of the super modern treatment methods have roots comming from different time, some times even more than 20 years. So the time for which it is trying to domineer do not impress me. For example the laser devices for preparing dental cavities are trying to domineer from the late 60's and the early 70's, which is more than 20 years.
As for the price I don't know what is the price of the LSTR therapy, but since it is additional to the standart treatment it is not possible it to be cheaper than the standart treatment. It may be not much more expensive, but it will still cost more thna the standart treatment.

#19 thedevinroy

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Posted 24 February 2012 - 01:52 AM

All great ideas, but that still doesn't address the issue of anaerobic bacteria in the dentin.

My gum and pulp have merged into a "gulp". I really don't see how they'd cap that thing.

Is there any process by which the tooth can be built up from the remaining dentin and enamel and then capped? Saving the pulp and really, the whole tooth.

#20 seivtcho

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Posted 24 February 2012 - 07:50 PM

devinthayer, from what You are writting in this topic, my oppinion is, that the pulp can not be saved. However, You may do an xray, in which to be determined the perspectives to be saved the tooth.

#21 manic_racetam

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Posted 25 February 2012 - 03:49 AM

xEva, therapies, that claim to be better than the standart treatments emerge very often. You can't possibly imagine how much and how different they can be - the 3mix that You have seen, a hudge amount of chemical substances, such as cupral for exampe, devices, that offer to kill microorganisms in the root canals with electricity, lasers, ultrasound, nanoparticles etc, etc. In my oppinion, based on my modest experience I must say, that so far nothing can substitute the perfect standart endodontic treatment, and if a new therapy appears, it needs at least ten years of mass spread usage to proove its worth.


You guys don't seem to understand what this therapy is about. It's been around for more than 20 years --30?-- in Japan. There are papers written about it based on research of adults (it was originally meant for children primary teeth) that spanned more than 10 years (in Indonesia, for example).

Talking about the cost -- it costs not much over the regular filling of the same size. And it works better than the traditional root canal. Because it does not weaken the tooth, like the traditional treatment. Check out this picture:

Posted Image

Before the 3Mix-MP therapy and 5 years later.

Note the remineralization of the tooth and the underlying bone.



Can you hope for this sort of results with the traditional root canal? And at the fraction of the cost? I think not. Google the 3Mix-MP LSTR therapy. And here us Journal of LSTR Therapy


Very impressive results. Where can you find a list of doctors that will perform this in the states?

#22 niner

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Posted 25 February 2012 - 04:03 AM

All great ideas, but that still doesn't address the issue of anaerobic bacteria in the dentin.

My gum and pulp have merged into a "gulp". I really don't see how they'd cap that thing.

Is there any process by which the tooth can be built up from the remaining dentin and enamel and then capped? Saving the pulp and really, the whole tooth.


I think you should see a dentist. It couldn't cost that much just to have someone look at it. They might even do it for free if you were going to have them do the work. Do you have a regular dentist? That might be best, although from your description you might want to talk to someone who specialized in restoration. You might need an xray to really know the story, and that would cost a few bucks but I think it would be worth it, unless the dentist took one look at it and said "no way, this thing is hopeless"... If you could take a well-lit, in-focus, close up picture and post it, someone here might be able to provide a good answer. One of our mods is a dentist, but I haven't seen him around in a while. I could PM him...

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#23 xEva

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Posted 25 February 2012 - 11:02 AM

Actually, such results (as shown on the xrays) can be achieved also with the standart treatment. If You do not believe me, You may go to the faculty of endodontics in the nearest dental university. There the practitioners definately will have simmilar before - after xrays, that show nice healing and a bone remineralisation after standart endodontic treatment.
Many of the super modern treatment methods have roots comming from different time, some times even more than 20 years. So the time for which it is trying to domineer do not impress me. For example the laser devices for preparing dental cavities are trying to domineer from the late 60's and the early 70's, which is more than 20 years.
As for the price I don't know what is the price of the LSTR therapy, but since it is additional to the standart treatment it is not possible it to be cheaper than the standart treatment. It may be not much more expensive, but it will still cost more thna the standart treatment.


You have not understood. The cost is slightly more than that of a standard filling of a similar size, not standard root canal treatment. The main advantage of LSTR therapy is that the tooth remains alive. It heals and remineralizes. This is not the case with the standard root canal treatment, which, by removing the nurturing pulp, precludes the tooth from ever improving. It can only get weaker, which it does.


devinthayer, that 3Mix-MP part of the therapy is the 3 antibiotics that, the research showed, kill all types of bacteria implicated in tooth decay. These 3 antibiotics (metronidazole, cipro and minocycline) are carried by propylene glycol, which showed superior penetration into dentin. Their research shows that it works at killing all that bacteria and then the tooth heals, damaged pulp regenerates fully and dentin remineralizes.


manic_racetam, it's hard to find a dentist in the US to do it. They see this new therapy as assault on their income. A friend of mine managed to convince a dentist in Lithuania to do it. He had to translate for him the relevant papers from English and he had to prepare and bring the 3Mix-MP himself. He saved a bundle of money and so far --this was in Dec 2011-- is happy with results.

Edited by xEva, 25 February 2012 - 11:17 AM.

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#24 thedevinroy

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Posted 25 February 2012 - 10:53 PM

All great ideas, but that still doesn't address the issue of anaerobic bacteria in the dentin.

My gum and pulp have merged into a "gulp". I really don't see how they'd cap that thing.

Is there any process by which the tooth can be built up from the remaining dentin and enamel and then capped? Saving the pulp and really, the whole tooth.


I think you should see a dentist. It couldn't cost that much just to have someone look at it. They might even do it for free if you were going to have them do the work. Do you have a regular dentist? That might be best, although from your description you might want to talk to someone who specialized in restoration. You might need an xray to really know the story, and that would cost a few bucks but I think it would be worth it, unless the dentist took one look at it and said "no way, this thing is hopeless"... If you could take a well-lit, in-focus, close up picture and post it, someone here might be able to provide a good answer. One of our mods is a dentist, but I haven't seen him around in a while. I could PM him...


I have gone to the dentist, and he blurted "root canal". I argued with him about it, and the only other option was to have it yanked. I don't like my options... so I'd prefer to fly in a dentist from Japan and do the 3Mix-2-Legit-2-Quit. Haha, like that's going to happen.

#25 thedevinroy

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Posted 26 February 2012 - 12:10 AM

I sent an email to an alternative holistic dentistry to see if they could take a look at it. They do mineral-composite-based caps and fillings. Give my pulp something more natural to work with instead of the ol metallic stuff. They also don't do root canals. I'm adamant about saving my pulp. It's not infected, and it's no longer inflamed, so there is no reason to expect a root canal if the nerve isn't already an issue. Makes no sense to yank out a nerve that feeds your dentin when it is functioning fine.

Where are you stem cell research?

#26 niner

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Posted 26 February 2012 - 04:24 AM

I have gone to the dentist, and he blurted "root canal". I argued with him about it, and the only other option was to have it yanked. I don't like my options... so I'd prefer to fly in a dentist from Japan and do the 3Mix-2-Legit-2-Quit. Haha, like that's going to happen.


Ok, if he wants to do a root canal, then the tooth can be saved. I'm more interested in the structural integrity of a tooth than the state of the nerve. Millions of people have root canals, seemingly successfully. I think the deadliness of them might be overstated, but I'm open to the idea that a bad outcome is possible. Probably a lot more likely if it's a sloppy job, and less likely with a competent dentist. If you want the best outcome, you should probably seek out an endodontist who is relatively young, thus more likely to be current, but with 5-10 years of practice under their belt, so they know wtf they're doing. Finding a good dentist can be a challenge; I went through a couple clowns before I found a guy who is good (and, unfortunately, overpriced, but I guess that goes with the territory).

#27 xEva

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Posted 27 February 2012 - 01:03 AM

I have gone to the dentist, and he blurted "root canal". I argued with him about it, and the only other option was to have it yanked. I don't like my options... so I'd prefer to fly in a dentist from Japan and do the 3Mix-2-Legit-2-Quit. Haha, like that's going to happen.


haha :-D When I researched this issue, I saw a guy posting on a dental board that he actually went to Japan to have it done. The dentists on the board hollered, calling him stupid and all that, but the guy said that with ticket and all (he lived in Canada) it cost him the same as the standard root canal treament, but he was happy that he ended up with an alive tooth in his mouth, not a dead one (it also helped that he had some connection with Japan, and that's how he knew about this treatment, and he also had help finding a dentist there).


Also, I would like to point out that this 3Mix-MP therapy also allows for much less drilling when it comes to regular cavities. Japanese research showed that there is no need to remove all the caries (softened dentin) as is the standard elsewhere. It is enough to minimally clean the cavity, put this 3 antibiotics mix in it, and seal it as usual. The softened dentin remineralizes. This way the structure of the tooth is maximally preserved. Of course, no western dentist wants to hear this news.

This also proves --to me at least-- that the main culprit in tooth decay are bacteria. Sterilize the tissues and seal -- and the tooth heals completely.

#28 nowayout

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Posted 27 February 2012 - 01:30 AM

I have had excellent teeth all my life (thank the gods for fluoridation) and I've never needed a filling in my 45 years, but the last time I went to the dentist he said that I have some pitting and demineralization on a molar and he wants to drill out a bit of the surface and apply a sealant filling. This seems kind of drastic to me, to give me a filling if I don't even have decay - they always seem to fall out at the most inconvenient times (not that I would have personal experience). Isn't there a way to remineralize the surface? For example, where I grew up, hygienists apply fluoride to the teeth every time you have a cleaning, but here in the U.S. they don't. Would that help?

I miss my old dentist! I might just wait until the next time I go back to visit my family in the old country. I'm sure he'll say that it's nonsense. But that's at the soonest a year from now, though.

Edited by viveutvivas, 27 February 2012 - 01:35 AM.


#29 niner

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Posted 27 February 2012 - 03:57 AM

Depends how bad the demineralization is. You could always get a second opinion. I'm constantly having fluoride treatments pushed at me, but a lot of insurance companies don't consider them worth paying for. You could try GC MI Paste/Recaldent or other tooth restoration products. That would probably be better than fluoride alone, although fluoride would probably help some.

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#30 xEva

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Posted 27 February 2012 - 11:16 PM

viveutvivas, I don't claim expertise in how to remineralize teeth. A while back I saw a thread about this in this very subforum, something about Act dental rinse, etc. You may want to check it out.

Personally, I found that cheese & black tea together as the last meal of the day do the trick, except that tea will dull the whiteness, if you care. But it works. Black tea is rich in F and cheese, of course provides Ca and protein.

Also I played with comfrey root as a rinse (together with some other herbs: horsetail, black cohosh, etc), and it worked very well, except that comfrey had a toxic side effect (liver), which precluded me from using it for longer than a week. But it does "tighten" the teeth. You can feel it work immediately - the sensation is hard to describe. So I just settled to sometimes drinking horsetail tea, which is rich in silica.

Otherwise, all those toothpastes and rinses with fluoride... the ones I checked did not have any Ca or Si in them. Not sure why, maybe they do not stay well in solution with F? That's the reason I find them lacking. Also, I found that F is somewhat toxic to the soft tissues of the mouth. Which I remedy by using a toothpaste without F right after the one with F, lol. I like Weleda's calendula toothpaste for this.

Hope you find something that works for you :)




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