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Glycine - The anti-obesity amino.

glycine obesity inflammation

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#1 Lufega

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Posted 29 January 2012 - 05:04 AM


Found this study about glycine very telling.

Glycine regulates inflammatory markers modifying the energetic balance through PPAR and UCP-2.

Almanza-Perez JC, Alarcon-Aguilar FJ, Blancas-Flores G, Campos-Sepulveda AE, Roman-Ramos R, Garcia-Macedo R, Cruz M.

Source

Posgrado en Biologia Experimental, Division de Ciencias Biologicas y de Salud, Universidad Autonoma Metropolitana Unidad Iztapalapa, Apdo- Postal 55-535, CP 09340, DF Mexico, Mexico. julcesarmac2@yahoo.com.mx
Abstract

Obesity is widely recognized as cause of metabolic syndrome and cardiovascular disease. It is provoked by imbalance between the spending and consumption of energy associated with a chronic inflammatory condition due to excessive storage of fat tissue. Obese patients have an impaired inflammatory profile that contributes to the development of vascular complications, with fat tissue being partially responsible for controlling both processes: energy balance (through PPAR) and inflammatory condition (through inflammatory markers). White adipose tissue produces cytokines (IL-6, TNF-α, resistin, adiponectin, etc.) and participates in a broad spectrum of processes. Recently, glycine has been reported to have anti-inflammatory properties which reduce TNF-α and IL-6 levels and increase adiponectin in 3T3-L1 adipocytes and in fat tissue of obese mice. In this study, the possible regulatory role of glycine on some factors involved in storage and energy burning (PPAR-γ, PPAR-α, PPAR-δ and UCP-2) was analyzed in lean and monosodium glutamate-induced obese mice (MSG/Ob mice). Glycine clearly increased fat tissue PPAR-γ expression in lean but not in MSG/Ob mice. The PPAR-γ and PPAR-α liver expression was repressed in both groups of mice, while the expression of PPAR-δ decreased only in lean mice. Interestingly, glycine treatment also suppressed the expression of UCP-2, TNF-α and IL-6 in lean mice, and increased adiponectin and insulin serum levels. In conclusion, glycine regulates the production of inflammatory cytokines through PPAR-γ. These results provide clues on glycine signaling mechanisms as an anti-inflammatory agent that might be useful for treatment of metabolic and vascular complications associated to inflammation in obesity.


Glycine is also a natural VEGF inhibitor (antiangiogenesis) so it has potential as an anti-tumor agent. To see some applications of VEGF inhibition, check out this ted talk.

Then there is this article by Ray Peat. While very long, it is definitely an interesting read. One of the points he makes is that consuming muscle meat exclusively puts your body in an inflammatory state while glycine consumption prevents or reverses that so this has anti-aging written all over that. The best part is that we should be consuming glycine/gelatin from our diet and we are not. So, simply making some dietary adjustments can influence your well-being in many ways.

Other things glycine/gelatin can do:To conclude, in the words of Ray peat; "When we eat animal proteins in the traditional ways (for example, eating fish head soup, as well as the muscles, or “head-cheese” as well as pork chops, and chicken-foot soup as well as drumsticks), we assimilate a large amount of glycine and gelatin."
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#2 DbCooper

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Posted 30 January 2012 - 02:20 AM

Couldnt agree more as Ive used 3 grams of glycine per day for the last year as a detox agent. Great info.

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#3 hamishm00

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Posted 30 January 2012 - 04:00 AM

There is also evidence that Glycine improves sleep quality when taken before bed. I take 5 grams nightly.

#4 Sillewater

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Posted 30 January 2012 - 06:39 AM

Cell. 2012 Jan 20;148(1-2):259-72. Epub 2012 Jan 5.


Glycine decarboxylase activity drives non-small cell lung cancer tumor-initiating cells and tumorigenesis.

Zhang WC, Shyh-Chang N, Yang H, Rai A, Umashankar S, Ma S, Soh BS, Sun LL, Tai BC, Nga ME, Bhakoo KK, Jayapal SR, Nichane M, Yu Q, Ahmed DA, Tan C, Sing WP, Tam J, Thirugananam A, Noghabi MS, Huei Pang Y, Ang HS, Robson P, Kaldis P, Soo RA, Swarup S, Lim EH, Lim B.



Source

Stem Cell and Developmental Biology, Genome Institute of Singapore, 60 Biopolis Street, Singapore 138672; Department of Respiratory Medicine, Tan Tock Seng Hospital, 11 Jalan Tan Tock Seng, Singapore 308433.



Abstract

Identification of the factors critical to the tumor-initiating cell (TIC) state may open new avenues in cancer therapy. Here we show that the metabolic enzyme glycine decarboxylase (GLDC) is critical for TICs in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). TICs from primary NSCLC tumors express high levels of the oncogenic stem cell factor LIN28B and GLDC, which are both required for TIC growth and tumorigenesis. Overexpression of GLDC and other glycine/serine enzymes, but not catalytically inactive GLDC, promotes cellular transformation and tumorigenesis. We found that GLDC induces dramatic changes in glycolysis and glycine/serine metabolism, leading to changes in pyrimidine metabolism to regulate cancer cell proliferation. In the clinic, aberrant activation of GLDC correlates with poorer survival in lung cancer patients, and aberrant GLDC expression is observed in multiple cancer types. This link between glycine metabolism and tumorigenesis may provide novel targets for advancing anticancer therapy.





Anyone have thought's on this?
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#5 Lufega

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Posted 30 January 2012 - 09:17 PM

In the clinic, aberrant activation of GLDC correlates with poorer survival in lung cancer patients, and aberrant GLDC expression is observed in multiple cancer types.



Anyone have thought's on this?


That seems to be describing a pathologic state. Cancer feeds on all the same nutrients your body needs to stay healthy. Folic acid and iron strongly promote cancer growth but do not necessarily cause the cancer in the first place.

#6 arcane

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Posted 30 January 2012 - 10:58 PM

3 grams before bed and I sleep great. Plus it tastes sweet if you get it in powder.

#7 niner

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Posted 31 January 2012 - 12:53 AM

Glycine decarboxylase activity drives non-small cell lung cancer tumor-initiating cells and tumorigenesis.

Identification of the factors critical to the tumor-initiating cell (TIC) state may open new avenues in cancer therapy. Here we show that the metabolic enzyme glycine decarboxylase (GLDC) is critical for TICs in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). TICs from primary NSCLC tumors express high levels of the oncogenic stem cell factor LIN28B and GLDC, which are both required for TIC growth and tumorigenesis. Overexpression of GLDC and other glycine/serine enzymes, but not catalytically inactive GLDC, promotes cellular transformation and tumorigenesis. We found that GLDC induces dramatic changes in glycolysis and glycine/serine metabolism, leading to changes in pyrimidine metabolism to regulate cancer cell proliferation. In the clinic, aberrant activation of GLDC correlates with poorer survival in lung cancer patients, and aberrant GLDC expression is observed in multiple cancer types. This link between glycine metabolism and tumorigenesis may provide novel targets for advancing anticancer therapy.


Anyone have thought's on this?


I guess the concern here is that excess glycine would result in an upregulation of GLDC, and that this would cause cancer. I think that's probably not too likely, as long as you stayed in the vicinity of a normal dietary amount of glycine; i.e., something like the amount you'd get on a high protein diet. We don't know what they mean by "high" in this paper; is it the high end of normal or is it non-physiological? That would make a difference.

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#8 DbCooper

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Posted 01 February 2012 - 01:02 AM

I also make bone marrow broth soup with that I source grass fed beef bones from. Left in the crockpot overnight with celery, onions and carrots this gives me a good amount of Glycine for the week.




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