• Log in with Facebook Log in with Twitter Log In with Google      Sign In    
  • Create Account
  LongeCity
              Advocacy & Research for Unlimited Lifespans

Photo
- - - - -

Cryonics summary - "what is cryonics?"

explanation summary information cryonics what does cryonics mean?

  • Please log in to reply
15 replies to this topic
⌛⇒ support MITOMOUSE via LongeCity!

#1 brokenportal

  • Life Member, Moderator
  • 7,046 posts
  • 589
  • Location:Stevens Point, WI

Posted 12 February 2012 - 04:15 AM



See the Longecity Cryonics comparisons and information page at longecity.org/cryonics


Information from the Cryonics Institute website:

Cryonics is a technique intended to hopefully save lives and greatly extend lifespan. It involves cooling legally-dead people to liquid nitrogen temperature where physical decay essentially stops, in the hope that future technologically advanced scientific procedures will someday be able to revive them and restore them to youth and good health. A person held in such a state is said to be a "cryopreserved patient", because we do not regard the cryopreserved person as being really "dead".

We believe that revival is a real possibility because:

(1) Many biological specimens have been cryopreserved, stored at liquid nitrogen temperature where all decay ceases, and revived; these include whole insects, vinegar eels, many types of human tissue including brain tissue, human embryos which have later grown into healthy children, and a few small mammalian organs. Increasingly more cells, organs and tissues are being reversibly cryopreserved.

(2) The repair capabilities of molecular biology and nanotechnology increasingly point to a future technology that can repair damage due to aging, disease and freezing.


Dr. Ralph Merkle, examining the plausibility of cryonics in his essay 'The Molecular Repair Of The Brain', observes, "Interestingly (and somewhat to the author's surprise) there are no published technical articles on cryonics that claim it won't work...A literature search on cryonics along with personal inquiries has not produced a single technical paper on the subject that claims that cryonics is not feasible. On the other hand, technical papers and analyses of cryonics that speak favorably of its eventual success have been published. It is unreasonable, given the extant literature, to conclude that cryonics is unlikely to work."

Notable technical papers which provides scientific evidence for the feasibility of cryonics are: ANNALS OF THE NEW YORK ACADEMY OF SCIENCES; Lemler,J; 1019:559-563 (2004) and REJUVENATION RESEARCH; Best,B; 11(2):493-503 (2008).

No one can guarantee success, because no one can guarantee the future. No one can predict scientific progress with certainty, but we believe a strong case can be made for the probable success of cryonics. But that doesn't mean that social disruptions aren't possible. Nuclear war, economic collapse, political strife, terrorism, are all possible, and they could end the lives of cryopreserved patients just as easily as they can end the lives of those outside it.

Posted Image


Edited by brokenportal, 27 March 2012 - 12:16 AM.

  • like x 2

#2 brokenportal

  • Topic Starter
  • Life Member, Moderator
  • 7,046 posts
  • 589
  • Location:Stevens Point, WI

Posted 12 February 2012 - 04:25 AM



How to increase the chance that your life will be preserved by signing up for cryonics: http://www.longecity.org/forum/topic/53816-how-to-sign-up-for-cryonics/



Longecity's current fundraiser is to help make the cryonics process as viable as it can be.



#3 benbest

  • Member, Advisor
  • 140 posts
  • 206
  • Location:Fort Lauderdale, Florida

Posted 15 February 2012 - 12:27 PM

There are numerous "what is cryonics" summaries and FAQs.
Here is a list of some of the most prominent:

http://www.benbest.c...cs/CryoFAQ.html

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cryonics

http://www.alcor.org/FAQs/index.html

http://www.alcor.org/sciencefaq.htm

http://cryonics.org/reprise.html

http://cryonics.org/prod.html

http://www.depressed...at-is-cryonics/

http://cryonics.org/...stification.pdf

(Video Lecture)

(Video Lecture)

-- Ben Best
  • like x 3

⌛⇒ support MITOMOUSE via LongeCity!

#4 benbest

  • Member, Advisor
  • 140 posts
  • 206
  • Location:Fort Lauderdale, Florida

Posted 16 February 2012 - 05:57 PM

There is a page on the Cryonics Institute website
that I wrote in an attempt to provide objective
information about all of the organizations in
the world that are offering cryonics services:

http://cryonics.org/comparisons.html

Although the page is on the CI website, I made
a great effort for the page to only offer objective
facts and figures rather than arguments about
why CI (or Alcor or the other organizations)
are better or worse.

Cryonics is based on the idea that future
medicine will have capabilities well beyond those
of current medicine, including the ability to
cure all diseases, rejuvenate and repair damage
incurred in the cryopreservation process -- through
the use of nanotechnology and other technologies.
Cryonics can be an ambulance or time capsule to
future medicine which can allow us to live many
thousands of years or longer in youth and good health.

Stored at very low temperatures there will
be very little molecular motion in cryonics
patients for tens of thousands of years,
although most of us do not believe that
we will have to wait anywhere near so long
for future medicine.

Although cryonics patients must be legally
dead before cryonics procedures to reduce or
eliminate ischemic damage and ice formation
can be applied, we do not believe that cryonics
patients are dead in an ultimate sense. We can
use a standby team to minimize the time between
pronouncement of death and cooling, cardiopulmonary
support, etc. But we believe that the anatomical
basis of mind can survive much longer than six
minutes after stoppage of the heart in the
absence of cooling -- despite the inability of
current medicine to revive patients without
neurological damage after more than six minutes
of cardiac arrest.

The cost of cryonics is many thousands of
dollars, but most cryonicists cover these costs
with life insurance policies that name a cryonics
organization as beneficiary. Premiums of life
insurance policies are most affordable for those
who are young and healthy. It is not prudent to
seek life insurance in old age or after a terminal
illness (when life insurance may be unobtainable).
Nor is it prudent to believe that cryonics
arrangements can be made efficiently or successfully
when in a terminal condition.

Rudi Hoffman sells the great majority of
cryonics life insurance policies. It makes
good sense to take advantage of Rudi's considerable
expertise in matters of cryonics and life insurance.
Rudi can be reached through his website:

http://www.rudihoffm...m/cryonics.html


-- Ben Best, President, Cryonics Institute

#5 benbest

  • Member, Advisor
  • 140 posts
  • 206
  • Location:Fort Lauderdale, Florida

Posted 27 March 2014 - 02:58 PM


brokenportal wrote:

> Notable technical papers which provides scientific evidence for the feasibility of cryonics are: ANNALS OF THE NEW YORK ACADEMY OF SCIENCES;
> Lemler,J; 1019:559-563 (2004) and REJUVENATION RESEARCH; Best,B; 11(2):493-503 (2008).

The link given for the second technical paper is obsolete. Active links can be found at:

http://www.benbest.c...stification.pdf

http://www.ncbi.nlm....pubmed/18321197

benbest wrote:

> There is a page on the Cryonics Institute website
> that I wrote in an attempt to provide objective
> information about all of the organizations in
> the world that are offering cryonics services:
>
> http://cryonics.org/comparisons.html

That link is also obsolete. An up-to-date comparisons page is available on the Longecity website:

http://www.longecity...es/cryonics-r40

-- Ben Best


  • like x 1

#6 abcmanomandriepunt1

  • Guest
  • 133 posts
  • 17
  • Location:Belgium
  • NO

Posted 28 March 2014 - 06:39 PM

I assume 'Neuro' means the brain, right?

#7 YOLF

  • Location:Delaware Delawhere, Delahere, Delathere!

Posted 29 March 2014 - 11:46 PM

Yes, and it generally included the skull. In the future it may be easier and more cost effective to take a sample of your cells, revert them to embryonic stem cells and use them to print an entirely new body that has been upgraded to the tomorrows specifications.
  • like x 2

#8 Antonio2014

  • Guest
  • 634 posts
  • 52
  • Location:Spain
  • NO

Posted 24 October 2014 - 06:21 PM

Is there any thread or website that explains the legal status of cryonics by country?



#9 YOLF

  • Location:Delaware Delawhere, Delahere, Delathere!

Posted 24 October 2014 - 07:27 PM

Alcor might have something like that on their site, but I'm not seeing it just skimming. It would be a good resource to have.



⌛⇒ support MITOMOUSE via LongeCity!

#10 Antonio2014

  • Guest
  • 634 posts
  • 52
  • Location:Spain
  • NO

Posted 24 October 2014 - 07:42 PM

Thanks. I found this, but it's only for the US. I will investigate the Spanish laws.


Edited by Antonio2014, 24 October 2014 - 07:42 PM.


#11 tautomeric

  • Guest
  • 22 posts
  • 7
  • Location:EU
  • NO

Posted 28 July 2016 - 09:21 PM

Is there a way one can be cryonized alive (at the very end of one's life) or at least just after heart failure (but BEFORE brain is clinicly dead) ? This would greatly improves the chances of being ressurected

 

Outside the US I guess. China ? Russia ?


Edited by tautomeric, 28 July 2016 - 10:08 PM.

  • like x 1

#12 YOLF

  • Location:Delaware Delawhere, Delahere, Delathere!

Posted 29 July 2016 - 10:44 AM

Your options are basically US, RU, or AU. What you're looking for are bedside standby options. Best to move to the provider for that, otherwise it's very expensive.



#13 tautomeric

  • Guest
  • 22 posts
  • 7
  • Location:EU
  • NO

Posted 29 July 2016 - 04:46 PM

Your options are basically US, RU, or AU. What you're looking for are bedside standby options. Best to move to the provider for that, otherwise it's very expensive.

 

I know what a standby is. I just want to know how to be cryonized before brain is clinicaly dead (heart failure is not accepted as proof of death)



#14 YOLF

  • Location:Delaware Delawhere, Delahere, Delathere!

Posted 29 July 2016 - 08:25 PM

You could use a service like Dignitas in Switzerland and arrange for standby to meet you there.


  • like x 1

#15 ceridwen

  • Guest
  • 1,287 posts
  • 94

Member Away
  • Location:UK

Posted 29 July 2016 - 11:40 PM

I asked the Cryonics Institute to do that for me and they said they wouldn't help because it would be suicide. I belive Alcor is different

⌛⇒ support MITOMOUSE via LongeCity!

#16 tautomeric

  • Guest
  • 22 posts
  • 7
  • Location:EU
  • NO

Posted 30 July 2016 - 08:01 AM

I asked the Cryonics Institute to do that for me and they said they wouldn't help because it would be suicide. I belive Alcor is different

 
That's the problem ! After all, if euthanasia or PAD is legal at the end of life, then why not choosing to be cryonized

Edited by tautomeric, 30 July 2016 - 08:05 AM.

  • Agree x 2





Also tagged with one or more of these keywords: explanation, summary, information, cryonics, what does cryonics mean?

0 user(s) are reading this topic

0 members, 0 guests, 0 anonymous users