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Lostfalco's Extensive Nootropic Experiments [Curated]

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#3841 Oakman

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Posted 09 August 2018 - 04:18 PM

I'm referring to the artificial blue lighting found in most houses and work places. You know, light from light bulbs

 

I have a 100% soft white LED lit house, so, yes, there is a some blue light from them, but the majority is closer to the red end of the spectrum. But those ultra white, garish blue-white LEDs I have only used in the garage in the form of T80 LED replacements.

 

Not sure mettmett, are you trying to relate home lighting to LLLT? LLLT light energy is much more intense @one frequency.  For example, my 660nm LLLT device has an output of ~100 watts/m2 vs. ~1-3 w/mfor interior LED lighting over all frequencies output (as measured in my home with an irradiance meter at head level). So we're talking up to x100 the light power to the skin with my LLLT and at that single 660nm. Maybe that helps you?


Edited by Oakman, 09 August 2018 - 04:45 PM.


#3842 mettmett

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Posted 10 August 2018 - 01:56 AM

I have a 100% soft white LED lit house, so, yes, there is a some blue light from them, but the majority is closer to the red end of the spectrum. But those ultra white, garish blue-white LEDs I have only used in the garage in the form of T80 LED replacements.

Not sure mettmett, are you trying to relate home lighting to LLLT? LLLT light energy is much more intense @one frequency. For example, my 660nm LLLT device has an output of ~100 watts/m2 vs. ~1-3 w/m2 for interior LED lighting over all frequencies output (as measured in my home with an irradiance meter at head level). So we're talking up to x100 the light power to the skin with my LLLT and at that single 660nm. Maybe that helps you?


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#3843 lostfalco

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Posted 12 September 2018 - 08:16 PM

Awesome!

 

My 660nm (Tendlite) and 810/850nm (Vetrolaser or LED arrays) devices are listed here for those who want to try out LLLT.  http://www.lostfalco.com/devices/

 

https://www.ncbi.nlm...pubmed/30043500

 

J Biophotonics. 2018 Jul 25:e201800173. doi: 10.1002/jbio.201800173. [Epub ahead of print]

Which wavelength is optimal for transcranial low-level laser stimulation?

Wang P1,2Li T1,2.
Abstract

One of the challenges in transcranial low-level laser therapy (LLLT) is to optimally choose illumination parameters, such as wavelength. However, there is sparse study on the wavelengths comparison especially on human transcranial LLLT. Here, we employed Monte Carlo modeling and visible human phantom to compute the penetrated photon fluence distribution within cerebral cortex. By comparing the fluence distribution, penetration depth, and the intensity of laser-tissue-interaction within brain among all candidate wavelengths, we found that 660, 810 nm performed much better than 980, 1064 nm with much stronger, deeper, and wider photon penetration into cerebral tissue. 660 nm was shown to be the best and slightly better than 810 nm. Our computational finding was in a surprising accordance with previous LLLT-neurobehavioral studies on mice. This study not only offered quantitative comparison among wavelengths in the effect of LLLT lightpenetration effectiveness but also anticipated a delightful possibility of online, precise, and visible optimization of LLLT illumination parameters. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

 


Edited by lostfalco, 12 September 2018 - 10:33 PM.

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#3844 lostfalco

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Posted 14 September 2018 - 01:54 PM

lostfalco, are you still buying the expensive ibudilast, or did you find a generic?

Still expensive from Mimaki. https://www.mimaki-f...item_branch=001



#3845 lostfalco

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Posted 18 September 2018 - 06:37 PM

Didn't see this one coming! lol
 
Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A. 2018 Jul 31;115(31):E7408-E7417. doi: 10.1073/pnas.1802021115. Epub 2018 Jul 16.
Aspirin binds to PPARα to stimulate hippocampal plasticity and protect memory.
Abstract

Despite its long history, until now, no receptor has been identified for aspirin, one of the most widely used medicines worldwide. Here we report that peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor alpha (PPARα), a nuclear hormone receptor involved in fatty acid metabolism, serves as a receptor of aspirin. Detailed proteomic analyses including cheminformatics, thermal shift assays, and TR-FRET revealed that aspirin, but not other structural homologs, acts as a PPARα ligand through direct binding at the Tyr314 residue of the PPARα ligand-binding domain. On binding to PPARα, aspirin stimulated hippocampal plasticity via transcriptional activation of cAMP response element-binding protein (CREB). Finally, hippocampus-dependent behavioral analyses, calcium influx assays in hippocampal slices and quantification of dendritic spines demonstrated that low-dose aspirin treatment improved hippocampal plasticity and memory in FAD5X mice, but not in FAD5X/Ppara-null mice. These findings highlight a property of aspirin: stimulating hippocampal plasticity via direct interaction with PPARα.

 
 
 
Here's a little info on PPARα.
 
Biol Psychiatry. 2018 May 1;83(9):761-769. doi: 10.1016/j.biopsych.2017.12.014. Epub 2018 Jan 10.

Peroxisome Proliferator-Activated Receptor Gamma Coactivator-1 Alpha as a Novel Target for Bipolar Disorder and Other Neuropsychiatric Disorders.

Abstract

Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma coactivator-1 alpha (PGC-1 alpha) is a protein that regulates metabolism and inflammation by activating nuclear receptors, especially the family of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors (PPARs). PGC-1 alpha and PPARs also regulate mitochondrial biogenesis, cellular energy production, thermogenesis, and lipid metabolism. Brain energy metabolism may also be regulated in part by the interaction between PGC-1 alpha and PPARs. Because neurodegenerative diseases (Huntington's disease, Parkinson's disease, and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis) and bipolar disorder have been associated with dysregulated mitochondrial and brainenergy metabolism, PGC-1 alpha may represent a potential drug target for these conditions. The purpose of this article is to review the physiology of PGC-1 alpha, PPARs, and the role of PPAR agonists to target PGC-1 alpha to treat neurodegenerative diseases and bipolar disorder. We also review clinical trials of repurposed antidiabetic thiazolidines and anti-triglyceride fibrates (PPAR agonists) for neurodegenerative diseases and bipolar disorder. PGC-1 alpha and PPARs are innovative potential targets for bipolar disorder and warrant future clinical trials.

 


Edited by lostfalco, 18 September 2018 - 06:40 PM.

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#3846 lostfalco

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Posted 24 September 2018 - 02:10 PM

Molecular hydrogen data is still looking very interesting!

 

I'm not sure if I 100% recommend it at this point, but the hydrogen water generator I use is listed here. http://www.lostfalco.com/devices/

 

I'm gonna start looking for cheaper devices to recommend for everyone. =)

 

https://www.ncbi.nlm...pubmed/30243887

Brain Res Bull. 2018 Sep 20. pii: S0361-9230(18)30519-7. doi: 10.1016/j.brainresbull.2018.09.012. [Epub ahead of print]
Hydrogen ameliorates chronic intermittent hypoxia-induced neurocognitive impairment via inhibiting oxidative stress.
Li W1Yang S1Yu FY1Zhao Y2Sun ZM1An JR1Ji E3.
Abstract

Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) is a very common breathing and sleep disorder characterized by intermittent hypoxia (IH), which is often associated with behavioral and neurocognitive functions impairment. Hydrogen (H2), as a novel and effective antioxidant, is reported to be a potential neuroprotective agent. The aim of this study is to investigate whether H2 could improve CIH-induced neurocognitive impairment and the related mechanism. Rats were exposed to IH for 5 weeks (8 h/day) and/or inhalation of H2 gas 2 h/day. Morris Water Maze test was used to appraise the spatial reference and working memory. The oxidative stress was evaluated through the level of MDA and SOD and apoptosis of hippocampal neurons was assayed with Bcl-2/Bax ratio and TUNEL staining. Our results showed that H2 treatment improved the CIH-induced spatial learning and memory impairments. Moreover, inhalation of H2 gas reduced the level of MDA and increased in the activity of SOD, indicating suppressed CIH-induced oxidative stress. In addition, H2 could increase expression of Bcl-2/Bax ratio and inhibited neurons apoptosis in hippocampus. In conclusion, these results suggest that inhalation of H2 could attenuate the CIH-induced neurocognitive functions impairment via anti-oxidant and anti-apoptosis effect. Additional, our findings may provide a potential therapeutic for neurocognitive diseases in patients with OSA.

 



#3847 lostfalco

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Posted 25 September 2018 - 04:32 PM

Have I ever mentioned that light is important for mood and cognition? :)

 

Recent rodent study discussing possible mechanisms. 

 

I also really liked the phrase "light deficiency". ha

 

 

https://www.ncbi.nlm...pubmed/30244030

Horm Behav. 2018 Sep 19. pii: S0018-506X(18)30250-2. doi: 10.1016/j.yhbeh.2018.09.003. [Epub ahead of print]

Light as a modulator of emotion and cognition: Lessons learned from studying a diurnal rodent.

Abstract

Light profoundly affects the behavior and physiology of almost all animals, including humans. One such effect in humans is that the level of illumination during the day positively contributes to affective well-being and cognitive function. However, the neural mechanisms underlying the effects of daytime light intensity on affect and cognition are poorly understood. One barrier for progress in this area is that almost all laboratory animal models studied are nocturnal. There are substantial differences in how light affects nocturnal and diurnal species, e.g., light induces sleep in nocturnal mammals and wakefulness in diurnal ones, like humans. Therefore, the mechanisms through which light modulates affect and cognition must differ between the chronotypes. To further understand the neural pathways mediating how ambient light modulates affect and cognition, our recent work has developed a diurnal rodent model, the Nile grass rat (Arvicanthis niloticus), by chronically manipulating daytime light intensity in grass rats housed under the same 12:12 hour light/dark cycle. This simulates lighting conditions during summer-like bright sunny days vs. winter-like dim cloudy days. Our work has revealed that chronic dim daylight intensity results in higher depression- and anxiety-like behaviors, as well as impaired spatial learning and memory. Furthermore, we have found that hypothalamic orexin is a mediator of these effects. A better understanding of how changes in daytime light intensity impinge upon the neural substrates involved in affect and cognition will lead to novel preventive and therapeutic strategies for seasonal affective disorder, as well as non-seasonal emotional or cognitive impairments associated with light deficiency.

 


Edited by lostfalco, 25 September 2018 - 04:33 PM.

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#3848 StabMe

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Posted 20 October 2018 - 04:22 AM

Hey LF and followers!

 

I've run a month log trial of nasal BPC-157. First week made me super sluggish and tired, i guess due to me becoming more sensitive to my own serotonin. But then tiredness gradualy subsided. 

I have another 5mg left and and am going to make another nasal solution, but this time i was thinking about adding some DMSO in the solution. This way, i am going to have an even better absorption. I know, BPC is said to be orally active, but i've heard speculations about it being less bioavailable than in injectable form. I am not afraid of needles or anything, i'd just hate to inject even once a day. So, since i am targeting the brain, some of the stuff will be absorbed by the nasal membrane and the rest, which goes down the throat and down into the stomach, might get better absorption due to DMSO being mixed in. I see 20% DMSO sprays intended for sinusitis treatment so this is kinda safe and tried. Maybe, this is the concentration i will start with.

 

What ya think?

 



#3849 basicallyyes

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Posted 28 October 2018 - 06:45 PM

Do you cycle sunlight?

 

Indirectly, yes. If someone stays outside too much they get sunburned and if they continue to do that every other day for years then it could lead to diseases. The question for LLLT is "what is too much" and we don't have that answer so I'm asking for anecdotes to come to some sort of informed conclusion.



#3850 Razor444

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Posted 29 October 2018 - 09:16 AM

Indirectly, yes. If someone stays outside too much they get sunburned and if they continue to do that every other day for years then it could lead to diseases. The question for LLLT is "what is too much" and we don't have that answer so I'm asking for anecdotes to come to some sort of informed conclusion.

 

I'd suggest,

 

If you're not getting 'brain fog' from the therapy, then there's likely not sufficient oxidative stress occurring to cause any damage.



#3851 Soalian

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Posted 29 October 2018 - 05:02 PM

Lostfalco, I know it's been a while since you mentioned it, but have you gotten around to trying EPO? I'm definitely intrigued by the cognitive applications of the compound, particularly in Bipolar disorders and other mental diseases.

I've been reading Dr Miskowiak's work and, although inconclusive, some results seem promising so far for neuroprotection, aside from the erythropoietic properties of recombinant EPO.



#3852 Razor444

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Posted 05 December 2018 - 06:42 PM

Podcast. W/ a focus on mitochondria.

 

'Navdeep Chandel, Ph.D.: metabolism, mitochondria, and metformin in health and disease (EP.31)'.

 

https://peterattiamd.com/navchandel/



#3853 mettmett

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Posted 19 December 2018 - 04:59 PM

Falco! Are you still using the god stack? What are you up to now a days?

For me, I recently(~2 weeks) got the trusii h2 x elite system which concentrates up to 10ppm of hydrogen into the water along with having a nasal canula. I plan on making a detailed blog post about my experience after I log some more time with it. So far I've liked it a lot.

Aside from that, the only thing new I've tried that I like is that I switched from being a "side sleeper" to a "back sleeper" with a new pillow that supports the neck rather than the head and my sleep has been better. I also have less back pain. Pretty cool.

#3854 Judd Crane

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Posted 23 March 2019 - 05:40 PM

Mimaki still carrying Ibudilast? Link is down for me. Any other vendors (preferably within the EU).



#3855 Zed

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Posted 24 March 2019 - 10:34 AM

Mimaki still carrying Ibudilast? Link is down for me. Any other vendors (preferably within the EU).

 

Mimaki Link still up.

Ketas $88 for 100 tabs.

I have it on my todo list to order next month.  Currently having the liquid form from irc.bio ( unfortunately closed shutters recently IIRC) . 
Gives me a nice sense of clarity .
 



#3856 Judd Crane

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Posted 31 March 2019 - 12:12 PM

Mimaki Link still up.

Ketas $88 for 100 tabs.

I have it on my todo list to order next month.  Currently having the liquid form from irc.bio ( unfortunately closed shutters recently IIRC) . 
Gives me a nice sense of clarity .
 

Apparently they need to block EU visitors… Anyone know if it's still possible to order from them using a VPN tunnel and maybe  a parcel forwarding service?



#3857 lesterlong

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Posted 10 April 2019 - 12:48 AM

Hey Last_Falco,

 

I was just wondering how much (in milligrams) of Pregnenolone you have been taking and for how long.

 

I am asking this becoz i have read on some forums in the past that its a hormone and can cause cancer or other unforetold physiological effects that may not be healthy. 

 

People have reported heart palpitations, high blood pressure, hair loss and high cortisol etc on doses ranging from 10 - 60 mg on long term daily bases.

So that makes me a little hesitant in taking it.

 

I do take a combo of Fish oil (1000mg 600EPA/300DHA)+5HTP (25mg)+Tyrosine (50mg)+Bcomplex (30mg)+ Vitamin C (500mg x 3 times = 1500mg) and it has been working wonders for me (cognition wise).

 

What is your take and your understanding of this novel nootropic (pregnenolone), as you have played with it for quite some time now.

 

Your input will be much appreciated.

 

Thanks.  


Edited by lesterlong, 10 April 2019 - 12:50 AM.


#3858 Judd Crane

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Posted 25 April 2019 - 04:47 PM

Managed to get my hands on a box of Ketas (Ibudilast). Seems to be making me slightly depressed though. I don’t have any problems with neuroinflammation so I doubt I’ll be continuing usage.


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#3859 Judd Crane

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Posted 12 May 2019 - 06:41 AM

I have a question regarding intranasal insulin. Do you think it's beneficial even for people with normal insulin levels? Do you have normal or low insulin?

 

 

 


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#3860 Judd Crane

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Posted 12 May 2019 - 08:32 AM

I'm curious about how this hack went. What's your stance on high dose iodine these days?

 

Upon upping my dose to 900mcg I started to feel hypothyroid. Getting hypothyroid from this dose only happens if someone is iodine deficient (which doesn't make much sense since I've been supplementing all these years.) or has an autoimmune thyroid issue. I'm up to 2500mcg now, and will scale back to a maintenance dosage of 1200mcg. There's lots more to the story that I won't get into here.

 







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