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Receeding gums, what can I do about it?

gum receeding

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#1 dunbar

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Posted 29 November 2013 - 08:49 PM


I have been struggling with RG for years now. It affects multiple teeth. Sometimes I think it has stabilizes
and then BANG I discover that within short time the gum has gone down on a certain tooth for a few millimetres.
I have been to several dentists complaining about this. All they say is brush carefully, which I do, and that
I should get a professional cleaning every now and then which I also do. But this does NOT help the fact
that the gum keeps receeding!
One issue could be that I gnash with my teeth at night but I already wear a protective bite thing at night
but this also doesn't seem to help the gum. It protects the surface of the teeth but even with the thing I can still gnash.
This is really dragging me down I mean it keeps getting worse and worse and worse and my dentist does nothing or maybe there is nothing one can do.
How's this supposed to go on? Even now there are some teeth where it's almost as low as it can get. :sad:

In the past I brushed with force and had no issues at all. Then suddenly it started. Now I brush totally careful and still it only gets worse.

I am using a super soft brush and also have a philips sonic care which I use in the sensitive mode. The sonic care is practical I hope it's not bad for the gum.

Edited by dunbar, 29 November 2013 - 08:50 PM.


#2 MizTen

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Posted 29 November 2013 - 09:18 PM

I have had gum disease for decades. Up til recently the most helpful things to stop more recession have been Co-enzyme Q10, vitamin C, correct flossing and cleaning, and an anti-inflammatory diet (grain-free modified Paleo). Oil pulling has also been very helpful.

I notice a large increase in plaque if I re-introduce inflammatory food due to travel or social events where I can't maintain the healthier diet.

About 5 months ago I started taking idebenone orally about 200 mg per day. My gums are definitely firmer and the recessions less visible since I started the idebenone. I believe an oral rinse with idebenone might be very therapeutic and plan to start doing this when I can figure out a protocol.

My next dental visit will be interesting, as the changes should be evident when they measure.

#3 nowayout

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Posted 29 November 2013 - 09:31 PM

Sometimes doxycyline is used.

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#4 dunbar

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Posted 01 December 2013 - 04:12 AM

Hi,
I never heard of idebenone. I dont think this is available where I live.

How much Q10 and C do you use? Which Q10 are you using?
Have you heard about rubbing calcium ascorbate onto the gum? I read about that but have not tied it.
I tried oil pulling with sesame oil a few times but not consistent. How long do you have to do this and how can you tell if it does anything? For me it's problematic cause when i get up in the morning i want to eat and not first do oil pulling for
20 minutes.

Doxy? What is this supposed to do, you mean against gum infections? I dont think i have infections.

Edited by dunbar, 01 December 2013 - 04:13 AM.


#5 nowayout

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Posted 01 December 2013 - 04:30 PM

Doxy? What is this supposed to do, you mean against gum infections? I dont think i have infections.


Gum recession is always in part from bacteria. Thus the common use of doxy for it.

Edited by nowayout, 01 December 2013 - 04:31 PM.

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#6 dunbar

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Posted 01 December 2013 - 11:47 PM

Interesting. I will ask my dentist about it. I guess you have to take the doxy long term then, right?
I once took doxy for the skin for many many weeks. Didnt really help much with the skin.

Btw, one dentist I went to took swab samples from the gum at multiple locations in the mouth. He pressed something under the gum to get the bacteria.
But the lab results basically said that there are no dangerous bacteria. But before going to the dentist I had used chlorhexidine which might have distorted the results. I'm not sure about that
but I think it's possible that the whole test was useless.

#7 BioFreak

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Posted 10 December 2013 - 11:00 PM

You could try oil pulling. Heard good things about it, no personal experience though.

#8 blood

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Posted 11 December 2013 - 01:37 AM

I don't have gum issues, but my gums always feel vaguely healthier when I use an electric toothbrush (in preference to a manual one), when I floss regularly, and when I'm taking CoQ10 & zinc picolinate.

I also like this product from Therabreath (marketed for bad breath, but is just an excellent & safe, general purpose mouthwash - non-acidic, neutralizes acidity, has xylitol, etc)
http://www.iherb.com...oz-473-ml/38731

Therabreath have some products specifically for people with gum disease (don't taste as nice, but are more potent):
1)http://www.therabrea...apy-system-kit/
2) http://www.iherb.com...oz-500-ml/38736
3) http://www.iherb.com...-oz-100-g/38739
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#9 dunbar

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Posted 11 December 2013 - 05:45 AM

Thank you for the recommendations. I have xylitol powder at home. I usually use it after eating sweets and let it dissolve in the mouth and then move it around there for a few minutes.

I don't know if these mouthwashes are available where I live. I have been using chlorhexidine and listerine but listerine is very spicy and it also contains alcohol which is probably not really
healthy on the long run when you think about cancer of the mouth.

#10 blood

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Posted 11 December 2013 - 06:28 AM

A problem with Listerine and most other mouthwashes, is that they are highly acidic, and actually will damage your teeth - see here:
http://www.freysmile...-eroding-enamel
(note in the above link, that Therabreath is one of the least acidic mouthwashes available).

Therabreath works by killing bacteria, but it's more effective and less destructive to your teeth than Listerine.

I am in Australia, and get my Therabreath products from iherb in the USA (only costs $8 airfreight/order to Australia now, not sure if it is as cheap to have things sent to Europe). Therabreath may have a European distributor.

Edited by blood, 11 December 2013 - 06:54 AM.

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#11 nightlight

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Posted 11 December 2013 - 08:36 AM

Through experimenting, I have completely solved similar gum problems using (once a day, before bed) a rinse from home made Liposomal Vitamin C + baking soda. After brushing with regular (non-fluoride) toothpaste I add to a quarter glass of warm water a half teaspoon of baking soda and a table spoon of Liposomal C liquid (made from sodium ascorbate, not ascorbic acid, so it is pH neutral), then rinse with it for couple minutes, with extra attention to the most troubling spots. Within a week, gum sensitivity due to chronic inflammation was gone, and in the six months of use so far, I haven't had the slightest problem even with hard brushes -- the gums have filled in and firmed up quite noticeably. The chronic infection and periodic abscess in one place which dentist insisted only root canal or extraction followed by implant could fix is completely gone without trace (even on X-ray where it was visible before). You can find recipes (with videos), users' testimonials & other info in the Liposomal C wiki.
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#12 dunbar

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Posted 15 December 2013 - 05:29 AM

I never tried ordering from iherb cause I worry about the customs. Maybe I can get Therabreath somewhere else from within the EU.

@ nightlight

What do they mean with ultrasonic cleanser? An ultrasonic toothbrush? I have a philips toothbrush but it's sonic and not ultrasonic.

If I can't produce this stuff myself then are there liposomal C supplements which I could try instead? I mean if this stuff would help my gums I'd even pay for it.

But I also think that my gnashing is the real issue. It's bad for the gums. I got a bruxism mouthpiece from my dentist made of hard plastic. I wear this at night and even after only a few months
this things has developed holes in it! This is freaking me out. I don't know if the plastic is even safe when you swallow tiny pieces of it and it's also dangerous. What if I gnash so hard that it
breaks and I swallow huge pieces of it or inhale them? :|o

#13 Gerrans

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Posted 15 December 2013 - 12:23 PM

Through experimenting, I have completely solved similar gum problems using (once a day, before bed) a rinse from home made Liposomal Vitamin C + baking soda. After brushing with regular (non-fluoride) toothpaste I add to a quarter glass of warm water a half teaspoon of baking soda and a table spoon of Liposomal C liquid (made from sodium ascorbate, not ascorbic acid, so it is pH neutral), then rinse with it for couple minutes, with extra attention to the most troubling spots. Within a week, gum sensitivity due to chronic inflammation was gone, and in the six months of use so far, I haven't had the slightest problem even with hard brushes -- the gums have filled in and firmed up quite noticeably. The chronic infection and periodic abscess in one place which dentist insisted only root canal or extraction followed by implant could fix is completely gone without trace (even on X-ray where it was visible before). You can find recipes (with videos), users' testimonials & other info in the Liposomal C wiki.


I did something similar and have had the same result. One can perform miracles with Vitamin C and a neutral mouth pH. The first sign was that I stopped getting blood in my toothpaste spit or on my floss once I started higher dose vitamin C. I threw out my mouthwash and started using baking soda in water. The only other thing I do now is chew xylitol gum after meals. A lifetime of mouth problems is over (and I had had blood in my toothbrush spit even as a boy).

Edited by Gerrans, 15 December 2013 - 12:23 PM.


#14 LucidMind

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Posted 19 January 2014 - 07:55 AM

I use a mouthguard at night. The problem is that my grinding eventually wears out the mouthguard after time so I need to get one replaced every year. The customized guards from the dentist are expensive and insurance does not cover them. I was thinking there has to be a cheaper alternative such as using a 3-D printer to make cheaper copies. Has anyone tried this? Anyone know what resins are used in mouthguards for bruxism?

Edited by LucidMind, 19 January 2014 - 07:56 AM.


#15 dunbar

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Posted 20 January 2014 - 12:20 AM

I have a mouthguard too and it also wears off and even gets holes! this scares me. what if it breaks during night?
this could be very dangerous and i also worry about wether the plastic is safe and free from platicizers. my dentist didnt know it for sure.




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