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Eidetic, Photographic Memory - Cracking the formula

eidetic photographic memory

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#91 medievil

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Posted 27 February 2016 - 05:21 PM

I took levetiracetam, there is no way it can improve your memory, it works just like any other anticonvulsants: drowsiness, brainfog and memory deterioration.

oh rly? its related to the racetams and its not unlikely it has a certain mechanism that has cognitive enhancing effects, remember that alot of ppl dont really notice cognitive decline with anticonvulsants or whatever, your experience doesnt mean anything with regards to what others can experience.



#92 medievil

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Posted 27 February 2016 - 05:50 PM

you wont crack this! maybe in 2030

Coming from the guy called there is a way, change your name to there is no way, feel free to add till 2030 but thats not essential. NOWAYTILL2030 is my recommedation as a username but youd have to like it as well offcourse.

 

Allright, all it takes for finding answers to this thread is first identifying what is behing remember photographic data,

 

Doing a quick search led me to abstracts about 

autobiographical memory, which ill make a thread about now as i dont think thats been discussed before.

First of all we need to identify the brainareas mainly involved in processing/seeing/remember a photo, then we need to figure out ways to improve activity of this brainarea by for example identifying the neurotransmitters that act on it, then wed need to modulate this brainarea with targetting that neurotransmitter targetting the brainarea with lasertherapy that guy with hes popular thread talks about is another method of enhancing this aspect of memory.

 

 

 
Brain Nerve. 2013 May;65(5):551-9.
[Cognitive function related to temporal lobe epilepsy: advances in research on new cognitive function].  
[Article in Japanese]
Author information  
  • 1Shizuoka Health Care Center, Central Japan Railway Company, Japan.
Abstract  

The importance of neuropsychological examinations in epilepsy care and, especially, in epilepsy surgery is centered on the following roles: they offer a means to confirm the epileptic focus by multi-modal preoperative assessments and they help to assess postoperative functional changes based on preoperative cognitive functions. Furthermore, assessments of the cognitive functions of patients with epilepsy using various tests aid in providing comprehensive medical care. Thus far, research on cognitive functions related to temporal lobe epilepsy has focused on memory, language, and general intelligence. However, the concept of social cognitive function has been recently proposed in the field of neuropsychology. This cognitive function, proposed by Brothers in 1990, is a collective term for functions needed in social life; these include functions required to interpret the expressions, feelings, and intentions of others and to form and maintain smooth human relationships while making decisions necessary for self-survival. These functions mainly involve facial expression recognition and decision-making. Findings of research on neural mechanisms underlying social cognitive functions have emphasized the roles of the cerebral limbic system, such as the amygdalo-hippocampal complexes, and the emotional system in the ventromedial prefrontal area. Studies on social cognitive functions in mesial temporal lobe epilepsy are being pursued currently. Early-onset right mesial temporal lobe epilepsy with hippocampal sclerosis is the key substrate determining a severe deficit in recognizing emotional facial expressions and decision-making. In the future, neuropsychological examinations of social cognition, in addition to those of global intelligence, memory, and verbal function, will contribute to the provision of comprehensive medical care to patients with epilepsy.

 

 

Cognitive consequences of two-thirds anterior temporal lobectomy on verbal memory in 144 patients: a three-month follow-up study.
Author information
  • 1University Clinic of Epileptology, Bonn, Germany.
Abstract

Previous studies have shown that left temporal lobectomy for intractable epilepsy can lead to verbal memory deficits. However, patients with left temporal lobe epilepsy (LTLE) frequently have impaired verbal memory preoperatively. The present analysis of 144 patients who underwent temporal lobe resections for either left (n = 68) or right (n = 76) temporal lobe epilepsy (LTLE, RTLE) addressed the questions of (a) whether a left two-thirds anterior temporal lobectomy (ATL) increases deficits in these qualitative aspects of verbal memory already impaired preoperatively, and (b) whether other aspects of verbal memory are additionally affected. We also evaluated possible determinants of preoperative abilities and postoperative changes, using multiple regression analysis. Preoperatively, patients with LTLE differed from patients with RTLE only in poorer performance on measures of long-term consolidation/retrieval (delayed recall). This is related to hippocampal pathology and seizure severity. Only left temporal lobe resections resulted in significant deterioration in verbal learning and memory. Acquisition over learning trials and recognition deteriorated most markedly, whereas performance in long-term consolidation/retrieval showed only minor changes. Preoperative performance levels, chronological age, the extent of the en bloc resection, preoperative performance on figural memory, and preoperative seizure severity were valuable determinants of postoperative changes in acquisition and recognition. In contrast, changes in consolidation/retrieval related only to preoperative ability. Left two-thirds ATL leads to new impairment in addition to preexisting memory deficits. The finding that left temporal lobectomy affects verbal acquisition and recognition more than long-term consolidation/retrieval, including the different determinants of these changes, most likely reflects the differential effects of surgery on mesial temporal and neocortical temporal functions.

Seems i have to show here how a simple pubmed search can learn us how differened aspects of memory are modulated by differened brainareas, theres not much research in this thread besides speculation and one of the its not possible guys, had many of them talking to me when i first researched tolerance prevention to most drugs.

 

Got a fucking headache looking at my screen


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#93 medievil

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Posted 27 February 2016 - 05:53 PM

"

Cracking the formula

 "

 

just filled the puzzle in, in my porn magazine so wheres this formula, too lazy to buy a magazine where filling in a puzzle can win you a price,didnt see any mention of prizes when cracking this fornula


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#94 medievil

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Posted 27 February 2016 - 05:57 PM

I need to crack the formula before i go back to belguim for a bit so i wont forget what beths body of babestation in the UK looks like.


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#95 medievil

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Posted 27 February 2016 - 06:04 PM

Seems that amazon has some literature.

http://www.amazon.co...,stripbooks,310


http://www.amazon.co...,stripbooks,310


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#96 fairy

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Posted 11 May 2016 - 12:21 AM

BUMP
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#97 fairy

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Posted 18 May 2016 - 08:46 PM

---

 
I had already read [53] but dismissed it because of the lack of information on the article and the generally discouraging reports you can find on the internet (although there are only a few). I'm reading now all the comments and there's something interesting though.
 
From your article:

>A blogger tried this method, and had *incredible* success with it.
>Do not get discouraged, it will work. It has been working for the military for 70 years.
>This system will take 1 month for you to develop a photographic memory.
 
From [53]:
 
>I have a photographic memory

But what does the author mean by that?

>hey, sorry it took so long to respond. that’s just the way it seems to be supposed to work. for the best results you’ll want to hang out in the dark for at least a few minutes to let your eyes adjust. then, do the winking back and forth thing like i said. if its only lasting a few seconds, that’s just right.

>Hey billie. I’m so glad to hear it’s been working for you. Yeah youre doing great. My favorite example is this: a few weeks ago I had a final in a psychology class I was taking. I totally forgot about it untill about it15 minutes before class and panicked. So I looked at this sheet of study q’s for a minute or so and went in hoping for the best. To my utter bafflement I had a perfect memory of the study guide I’d barely looked at like it as a cheatsheet inside my own head and wound up getting a perfect score on material that until few minutes prior was totally foreign to me. Wow. That’s what you and anyone else who follows through has ti look forward to. Keep me posted. I love hearing it



#98 Un chien andalou

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Posted 18 May 2016 - 09:25 PM

Yeah I think photographic memory doesn't exist, maybe Stephen Wiltshire has the closest thing to it, but he's definitely not your average Joe.
But I think that with training you can develop a very good memory, not photographic surely but you are not a Xerox, lol...

There are a lot of mnemonists and professional poker players that have a terrific memory (usually by using the memory palaces), you just need to train yourself to do so at least once a day. It's not something you get after a couple hours of training, you need (likely) months and more.
That's the boring part, definitely, but nootropics like Dihexa, NSI-189, Hydergine, Nicergoline, Fasoracetam, Coluracetam, Noopept etc can surely help speed up the training



#99 fairy

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Posted 19 May 2016 - 08:20 AM

Mnemonics is VERY effective. I started with 20 digits at a time and did some attempts with 100 digits (like 3 or 4). Then proceeded to prepare ~167 loci (do not write them down, only rehearse them in your head) and memorized 500 digits in 1 hour and 15 minutes. Got like 90+% and half of the mistakes were permutations. My first and only attempt. I had associations with only ten people so the ratio accuracy/time could dramatically be increased. The record for 500 digits is like 5 minutes.
 
Still, mnemonics is not eidetic memory in the sense that you can't stare at the paper for 30 seconds, let your brain soak up with digits and have perfect retrieval afterwards. I don't find the idea of near perfect accuracy regarding a particular set of data implausible by the way. There are a lot of accounts of people reading pages of textbooks from memory. Then, you can listen to music and have photographic imagery while lucid dreaming (both from personal experience). You *just* have to do this while awake.



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#100 Grandmaster

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Posted 19 May 2016 - 11:54 AM

Also even if you are a mnemonics expert and possibly have memorized a book with hundreds of loci, which would take enormous time to do, it still takes some time to "decode" informations from memonics. My post from 24th of July 2015 was about Johny von Neumann and his abilities:

At the age of six, he was able to exchange jokes with his father in classical Greek. The Neumann family sometimes entertained guests with demonstrations of Johnny's ability to memorise phone books. A guest would select a page and column of the phone book at random. Young Johnny read the column over a few times, then handed the book back to the guest. He could answer any question put to him (who has number such and such?) or recite names, addresses, and numbers in order.

Its not possible to memorize a page of phone book in such short time using any of known mnemonics, so its pretty clear that he must  had an eideitc memory. I have read a Stan Ulam's book "Adventures of a mathematican" in which he had written some informations about Johnny von Neumann one of them was "Johnny, for example, did not have any intuition, inner sense and the ability to guess what will happen in a given physical situation. His memory was mainly auditory, not visual." He was a very good and close friend of von Neumann and that information made me doubt the value of the legends of his  "photographic" memory. Its very possible that he just had an incredible good memory and he memorized all those informations in normal way, not by having a mental photo in his brain...Also i think we should focus on lucid dreaming or some kind of visual imagery training, not on nootropics. Having an eidetic memory only during the time of dosing some experimental substance sounds pretty bad.



#101 fairy

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Posted 19 May 2016 - 06:18 PM

>Also i think we should focus on lucid dreaming or some kind of visual imagery training, not on nootropics. Having an eidetic memory only during the time of dosing some experimental substance sounds pretty bad.
 
Nootropics aren't that bad if they allow you to wire parts of your brain in an otherwise hardy attainable *configuration*, this excluding any possible side effect. To do this and to obtain maximum efficacy you'd have to put some effort in what you desire to achieve. Talking about methods, I think a tight sleep schedule that puts you into sleep deprivation is desirable. You want to have better access to hypnagogic hallucinations and dreams. This may not be healthy since the last time I tried I got sick in a couple of days, but is a reliable way of entering dreams in a controlled fashion, using techniques like FILD.
 
Hopefully you will be able to enter is such a state during a less demanding schedule. It is often said about polyphasic sleepers that they maintain the ability to fall asleep for nap within seconds, even after having returned to a monophasic schedule. Meanwhile in your dreams you'll have to work into accessing real memories. Music seems easier to me but I have infrequent and short lucid dreams and I've not had any real occasion to try and to evoke real life text or personal memories. I'm trying to restrict my sleep again these days and thanks to a healthier diet and some brief naps the idea seems more feasible.
 
The problem with this and any other exotic ability is that no one cares to train one hour a day for months (and even a lot more) until he is able to see tangible results. I have blindfolded myself for one hour a day for two weeks without any appreciable gain in terms of imagery. I'll guarantee you that doing this for a year would yield some interesting results. I gave up early because it was frustrating seeing no improvement in two whole weeks. The same applies to methods like active visualization, some types of meditation, the after image technique, etc... train them hard enough and you'll be able to OBE at will and some other fancy stuff.



#102 Grandmaster

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Posted 19 May 2016 - 07:09 PM

Tesla was a polyphasic sleeper and it is said that he could memorize whole books. "Tesla would visualize an invention in his mind with extreme precision, including all dimensions, before moving to the construction stage, a technique sometimes known as picture thinking. He typically did not make drawings by hand but worked from memory. Beginning in his childhood, Tesla had frequent flashbacks to events that had happened previously in his life.". Its very possible that Tesla had true photographic(eidetic) memory but possibly part of those informations are kind of legend as in the case of John von Neumann. I also have experimented with some brain waves like delta and theta. Delta are present during deepest sleep, during deep meditation and theta are the most common brain waves during meditation, trance, hypnotic and intense dreams. Interesting thing is that i could visualise some words in my head during listening to those brain waves, but they were random- i couldnt visualise what i wanted to...



#103 fairy

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Posted 21 May 2016 - 01:15 PM

TeslaLED for Android has a strobe option with flashes of very short duration. It works even with the screen off. Seems one of the best apps for this purpose.

You don't really need an adaptation period to try and read something from a book. I'd say that this is a better version of the afterimage technique.

Edited by fairy, 21 May 2016 - 02:01 PM.

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#104 Grandmaster

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Posted 21 May 2016 - 08:10 PM

Looks good i gonna check it and give feedback.



#105 fairy

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Posted 27 May 2016 - 09:04 PM

https://en.wikipedia.../wiki/Analeptic
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/SIB-1757
https://en.wikipedia...wiki/Picrotoxin
https://en.wikipedia...i/Physostigmine
https://en.wikipedia...ntylenetetrazol
 
The book talks also about hypnosis and hypermnesia (399-402) but the pages are not included in the preview.
 
Source:
The Processing of Memories (PLE: Memory): Forgetting and Retention
By Norman E. Spear
https://goo.gl/Bvi2Km

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#106 fairy

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Posted 30 May 2016 - 02:35 PM

X=23:1:29;
%minutes/pages
Y(1)=28/9;
Y(2)=41/8;
Y(3)=38/9;
Y(4)=39/9;
Y(5)=28/9;
Y(6)=23/9;
Y(7)=17/9;

plot(X,Y,'--ko');
grid on
title('First week timings reading at 1 flash/sec');
xlabel('day of the week x/05/2016');
ylabel('pages per min');

* Error in the graph: pages per min to min per page.

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Edited by fairy, 30 May 2016 - 02:57 PM.


#107 fairy

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Posted 09 June 2016 - 06:47 AM

I sit in the dark and read 9 pages from my kindle using 1 flash/s as light source. I can't say I have noticed anything interesting. You have to actively focus on the afterimage otherwise you'll find yourself just waiting for the next flash.

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#108 Grandmaster

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Posted 18 September 2016 - 09:36 PM

Refresh, i tried combo of 1g pramiracetam, 100mg caffeine and 50mg noopept - not huge impact on any type of memory, especially not visual one. Far, far away from eidetic



#109 fairy

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Posted 19 September 2016 - 11:03 PM

Don't feel discouraged if you don't get much from Pramiracetam the first time. I've bought Aniracetam at my local pharmacy and the product information leaflet states that a *therapeutic effect* becomes noticeable between 2 and 4 months at 1.500 mg per day. Running out of money could be a concern though, since it is quite expensive. I suggest you trying the after image meditation. Either you print a black shape on a sheet or you exercise with a candle. I completed my first week and I'm planning to go on indefinitely.

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#110 Grandmaster

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Posted 26 October 2016 - 02:57 PM

Refresh, still working on cracking eidetic memory secret, gonna be useful in my future PhD


Edited by Grandmaster, 26 October 2016 - 02:58 PM.

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#111 Godof Smallthings

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Posted 28 October 2016 - 04:19 AM

As far as I recall, noopept has been tested to be most effective between 10g and 20g. Howcome you picked a 50 mg dose?



#112 Grandmaster

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Posted 28 October 2016 - 06:16 PM

As far as I recall, noopept has been tested to be most effective between 10g and 20g. Howcome you picked a 50 mg dose?

 

10 grams? I know that you meant 10-20mg - noopept recommended dose is 10-50mg so my dose is good, not even close to overdose. And im 6'7" just saying... Still working on eidetic memory.



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#113 Grandmaster

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Posted 20 November 2016 - 11:02 PM

Refresh



#114 Grandmaster

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Posted 27 November 2016 - 04:03 PM

Yesterday i tried to memorize 24 digits in 3 rows using a dark room and TeslaLED app for 15 minutes but only result i got was a short afterimage for 0,5 a second and not very vivid. One row is the best result i got. Big problem with "photographic memory" is that our eyes are focusing on the centre of the book page/numbers/objects and elements on the sides are blurred... I tried to fix it by adjusting the distance to the text but its still a problem. Also i have mixed phenibut,pramiracetam,citicoline,prl 8-53 and noopept with caffeine but it had no positive effects on visual memory. Thanks God i got those free so i didn't lose money.

 

We gonna crack eidetic memory formula, if someone has some interesting idea how to do it - pm me, Fairy seems to be inactive since few weeks ago.



#115 izan82

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Posted 08 December 2016 - 12:58 AM

Perhaps you could look into Ziziphus Jujuba: ''A quick google told me that the dendate gyrus, from your first article, is a region in the hippocampus associated to deal with the function of episodic memory. While this is fantastic, I'm also really curious if this compound has an effect on your semantic memory as well, which is processed in a close area to the gyrus'' ---> https://www.reddit.c...c_that_crazily/



#116 Grandmaster

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Posted 27 December 2016 - 08:08 PM

Refresh



#117 PhaQ

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Posted 28 December 2016 - 06:15 AM

I'd recommend you all to check out this old website

https://web.archive..../navaching.com/

 

Its very new agey, but I think you would find the information under 'Hawkeen Training' very interesting.



#118 Grandmaster

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Posted 21 January 2017 - 04:58 PM

After a few months of studying at my country's finest and one of the oldest universities in the world, after reading hundreds pages of complex texts for exams and reading about possibility of developing eidetic memory i can say few things about it: 1. Developing eidetic memory through using nootropics is expensive and very risky as side effects may be very bad like with desmopressin etc. so its not worth it. 2. I have read more about genius Johny Von Neumann( guy in my avatar) and it seems that he had memory for textes, exams, names but not visual eideitc memory, He didnt memorize faces well and had trouble finding glasses in the house where he has been living for years. Only confirmed true eidetic memory was memory of Elizabeth who could visualy memorize 10,000 thousands of random dots and see difference between patterns. 3. Kim Peek and other savants had unbeliveably good memory but not "mental snapchats". 4. Only way to memorize thousands of digits, texts, names, dates is to use mnemonics like loci method and major system but to memorize whole book with that metod is unbeliveably time-consuming and for me at univeristy the "Repetito est mater studiorum" is best way to learn something. I look forward for eidetic memory cracking progress but i think its highly dubious that we gonna figure out how to develop it.


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#119 medievil

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Posted 27 January 2017 - 11:12 AM

Anyone tried amphetamine and a preworkout with those nootropics, and semax, cereybrolysin etc offcourse.



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#120 Grandmaster

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Posted 13 February 2017 - 12:48 AM

If you look at my post from 21 january then point of refreshing is dubious, but i still gonna do it. I never gonna give up since mnemonic systems are insufficient to reach my goal....







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