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The Perfect Stack

stack regime regimen perfect genius savant brain nootropic cognition

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#1 William Bell

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Posted 29 July 2014 - 03:14 PM


Hi,
I realized that lurkers or contributors from a specific subforum sometimes do not travel to another so I decided to make another here to ask for any suggestions for additions or removal.
After the initial contributions of some members of this forum, I've made this;
 

Morning

Whey + blended ginger and onion (24g protein) before and after 2 hr morning workout;

Multijointed strength training with leg strength training and ends with 30 minutes of HIIT cardio (continuously increasing progression),

 

Creatine 2g,

Multivitamin, (*Iron, Folic Acid, Vitamins above RDA)

Ginkgo Biloba tablet 40mg x2,

Fish oil (180EPA + 120DHA) x3,

Baby aspirin 81mg, (*NSAIDs said to interfere with benefits of strength workout (?) )

Picamilon 150mg,

Aniracetam 750mg,

Piracetam 2.4g,

Oxiracetam 400mg,

Lion's Mane 500mg,

PhosphatidylSerine 100mg,

Bacopa 20% 500mg,

CDPCholine 250mg,

Sulbutiamine 400mg,

Pyritinol 400mg,

Noopept 20mg,

Galantamine 4mg,

Phenibut 250mg,

MSM, Condroitin, Glucosamine 500mg, (*Condroitin cancer risk (?) )

 

during a vegetarian breakfast (majority Kale and Spinach but changes)

 

1 hr brain training (Tetris and N-Back)

 

Afternoon

Whey + blended ginger and onion (24g protein),

Creatine 2g,

Ginkgo Biloba tablet 40mg x2,

Fish oil (180EPA + 120DHA) x3,

Picamilon 150mg,

Aniracetam 750mg,

Piracetam 2.4g,

Oxiracetam 400mg,

Lion's Mane 500mg,

PhosphatidylSerine 100mg,

Bacopa 20% 500mg,

Sulbutiamine 400mg,

Pyritinol 400mg,

Noopept 20mg,

MSM, Condroitin, Glucosamine 500mg,

during a vegetarian lunch (majority Kale and Spinach but changes)

 

45min nap.

 

Night

Whey + blended ginger and onion (24g protein),

Creatine 2g,

Ginkgo Biloba tablet 40mg x2,

Fish oil (180EPA + 120DHA) x3,

Picamilon 150mg,

Lion's Mane 500mg,

PhosphatidylSerine 100mg,

Bacopa 20% 500mg,

Sulbutiamine 400mg,

Pyritinol 400mg,

Noopept 20mg,

MSM, Condroitin, Glucosamine 500mg,

Melatonin 0.3mg, (*hormone dependency)

during a vegetarian dinner (majority Kale and Spinach but changes)

 

30min brain training (Tetris and N-Back)

1 hr strength training (ends with 30min cardio)

before an at least 8 hr sleep.

The full discussion is available at http://www.longecity...857#entry677857

Apologies if i'm not allowed to open another.. You're free to close this down immediately.


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#2 mustardseed41

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Posted 29 July 2014 - 03:36 PM

Excessive exercise unless your some kind of competitve athlete.


Edited by mustardseed41, 29 July 2014 - 03:39 PM.


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#3 William Bell

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Posted 30 July 2014 - 02:11 PM

Excessive exercise unless your some kind of competitve athlete.

The strength and endurance workouts are to increase BDNF and HgH..

So if I do not feel overly lethargic or having severe DOMS, will they be alright?



#4 Jun Han

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Posted 01 August 2014 - 10:00 AM

With the massive amount of racetams and other nootropics you are taking, it is a common advice to add cholinergic supplements to assist in acetylcholine signalling aside from your indirect cholinergic Galantamine.

I'd suggest a dietary intake of choline, with a preferance of CDP-choline and Alpha-GPC for the aforementioned nootropic purposes over Choline Bitartrate and Lecithin.

If you're insisting for an addition to your stack, adding both of them may confer benefits as well, with or without the racetams, and since the primary mechanisms of action of CDP-choline and Alpha-GPC are different, taking both may stack their singular benefits.

What source of choline should I use?
Choline bitartrate is sufficient for any liver benefits of choline, although for nootropic purposes a more expensive form may be required. Both CDP-Choline and Alpha-GPC are effective.
The term 'cholinergic' is sometimes used to refer to supplements that positively influence acetylcholine (a neurotransmitter that mediates muscle contraction and learning) signalling in the brain. This can refer to compounds that indirectly increase acetylcholine levels (such as inhibitors of the acetylcholinesterase enzyme) or supplements that deliver dietary choline to the body.
Based upon Examine.com

→ source (external link)

Alpha GPC Stacking
Alpha GPC is great to stack. Actually, it is highly recommended if you are taking racetams or other supplements that will cause an increase in demand for Acetylcholine. This will include all the racetams like: Piracetam, Aniracetam, Oxiracetam, Pramiracetam and Noopept.

Stacking Alpha GPC with the other racetams may help potentiate nootropic effects and possibly reduce side effects normally seen in these substances. If you are taking racetams or other nootropics and experience neurological side effects like headaches or fatigue try incorporating Alpha GPC into your stack. This may help reduce or eliminate these side effects and may result in increased cognitive benefits.

→ source (external link)

Alpha-GPC: An Introduction
Why Would I Take This Dietary Supplement If I’m Already Taking CDP-Choline?
Initial studies suggest that both supplements may be equally effective. Since these substances operate at opposite ends of the spectrum, they complement and support one another

→ source (external link)

 


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#5 Dolph

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Posted 01 August 2014 - 10:42 AM

The moment that Tetris qualifies as "brain training" I'll know I'm demented already.
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#6 William Bell

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Posted 01 August 2014 - 10:46 AM

With the massive amount of racetams and other nootropics you are taking, it is a common advice to add cholinergic supplements to assist in acetylcholine signalling aside from your indirect cholinergic Galantamine.

I'd suggest a dietary intake of choline, with a preferance of CDP-choline and Alpha-GPC for the aforementioned nootropic purposes over Choline Bitartrate and Lecithin.

If you're insisting for an addition to your stack, adding both of them may confer benefits as well, with or without the racetams, and since the primary mechanisms of action of CDP-choline and Alpha-GPC are different, taking both may stack their singular benefits.

Okayy. so ill add in both Alpha gpc and cdp choline. I'll try to determine the dosages.. You can suggest the dosages as well.

While we're at this, should I add Choline Bitartrate and lecithin for their singular benefits too?


The moment that Tetris qualifies as "brain training" I'll know I'm demented already.

Not when you're playing at extreme speeds. :laugh:

Playing anything at normal level is not a sort of training but when it comes to going further than the average and constantly increasing the challenges...


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#7 Dolph

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Posted 01 August 2014 - 10:48 AM

Not when you're playing at extreme speeds. :laugh:
Playing anything at normal level is not a sort of training but when it comes to going further than the average and constantly increasing the challenges...


I'm sure it requires (manual) skills, but I wouldn't expect any cognitive benefit.
To improve physical coordination yoga or gymnastics would be better suited for example.
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#8 William Bell

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Posted 01 August 2014 - 10:59 AM

 

Not when you're playing at extreme speeds. :laugh:
Playing anything at normal level is not a sort of training but when it comes to going further than the average and constantly increasing the challenges...


I'm sure it requires (manual) skills, but I wouldn't expect any cognitive benefit.
To improve physical coordination yoga or gymnastics would be better suited for example.

 

I've read that it does improve brain size and efficiency.

Besides, it is common knowledge that these brain games that puts mental processing to a challenge will eventually makes the brain more efficient.


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#9 Jun Han

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Posted 01 August 2014 - 11:13 AM

 

Not when you're playing at extreme speeds. :laugh:
Playing anything at normal level is not a sort of training but when it comes to going further than the average and constantly increasing the challenges...


I'm sure it requires (manual) skills, but I wouldn't expect any cognitive benefit.
To improve physical coordination yoga or gymnastics would be better suited for example.

 

Tetris does confer cognitive benefits, from the multiple studies I have read.

Tetris has been scientifically studied, and a mere daily 30 minutes for just 3 months is shown to improved mental efficiency, as proven via fMRI scans, and thicker cortical cortex, proven via sMRI.

The thicker cortex areas are the Brodmann Area (BA) 6 in the left frontal lobe [planning of complex, coordinated movements] and BA 22 and BA 38 in the left temporal lobe [multisensory integration and mental coordination of visual, tactile, auditory, and internal physiological information]. The greater efficiency is noted in the right frontal and parietal lobes including BAs 32, 6, 8, 9, 46 and BA 40 [critical thinking, reasoning, and language and processing].

This cognitive enhancement benefits may be separate from just motor skills, as juggling, which is a better training for motor skills enhancements, eventually improve different areas than Tetris.

Is Tetris good for the brain?
01 Sep 2009

The girls who practiced showed greater brain efficiency, consistent with earlier studies. Compared to controls, the girls that practiced also had a thicker cortex, but not in the same brain areas where efficiency occurred.
“One of the most surprising findings of brain research in the last five years was that juggling practice increased gray matter in the motor areas of the brain,” said Dr. Rex Jung, a co-investigator on the Tetris study and a clinical neuropsychologist. “We did our Tetris study to see if mental practice increased cortical thickness, a sign of more gray matter. If it did, it could be an explanation for why previous studies have shown that mental practice increases brain efficiency. More gray matter in an area could mean that the area would not need to work as hard during Tetris play.”
According to the researchers, Tetris was a useful tool for brain research as it requires many cognitive processes like attention, hand/eye co-ordination, memory and visual spatial problem solving all working together very quickly.

→ source (external link)

Does Tetris Boost Brainpower?
Emily Singer; September 1, 2009
Practicing the computer game appears to make some parts of the brain more efficient.

→ source (external link)

That is based upon:

MRI assessment of cortical thickness and functional activity changes in adolescent girls following three months of practice on a visual-spatial task; BMC Research Notes 2009, 2:174; doi:10.1186/1756-0500-2-174
Richard J Haier, Sherif Karama, Leonard Leyba and Rex E Jung

Findings: After three months of practice, compared to the structural scans of controls, the group with Tetris practice showed thicker cortex, primarily in two areas: left BAs 6 and 22/38. Based on fMRI BOLD signals, the Tetris group showed cortical activations throughout the brain while playing Tetris, but significant BOLD decreases, mostly in frontal areas, were observed after practice

→ source (external link)


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#10 goodman

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Posted 01 August 2014 - 11:25 AM

too much...your liver...
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#11 Dolph

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Posted 01 August 2014 - 11:26 AM

That's non-evidence, because it's ignoring the law of specificity!
No mater what you do regularly, it will always cause significant changes to your brain. If you play tetris you train playing tetris and get better at playing tetris. Duh!
If you smash your head on the table for an hour everyday you train smashing your head on a table and, as far as possible, will get better at doing so.

To think that tetris will do anything in terms of intellectual antiaging or useful cognitive benefits is so outright retarded that playing tetris actually might even be a viable strategy...
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#12 Jun Han

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Posted 01 August 2014 - 11:38 AM

That's non-evidence, because it's ignoring the law of specificity!
No mater what you do regularly, it will always cause significant changes to your brain. If you play tetris you train playing tetris and get better at playing tetris. Duh!
If you smash your head on the table for an hour everyday you train smashing your head on a table and, as far as possible, will get better at doing so.

To think that tetris will do anything in terms of intellectual antiaging or useful cognitive benefits is so outright retarded that playing tetris actually might even be a viable strategy...

Even if you are better only at Tetris, we cannot deny the fact that there are real changes in the brain, whether or not those changes are linked to intelligence.

Cognition does not necessarily means intelligence, and in this context, yes, Tetris confers cognitive benefits by increasing efficiency in particular areas of the brain as well as physical changes such as the thickening of particular cortical cortices. To think that Tetris "will do anything in terms of intellectual antiaging" is currently a rush, but to deny this evidence that it is an enhancement to your brain, and therefore its processes, and thus the cognition, is ignorance.

 

Being good at Tetris specifically may not have a working benefit in the real world but it is an enhancement to cognition, irregardless of whether it will make you more intellectual.

Nobody in this thread said that this benefit to those part of your cognition is certain to be brought forward to other aspects of intelligence.


Edited by Jun Han, 01 August 2014 - 11:39 AM.

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#13 William Bell

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Posted 01 August 2014 - 11:43 AM

too much...your liver...

How sure are those taxing to my liver?

Any ways for me to reduce the damages?


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#14 goodman

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Posted 01 August 2014 - 12:23 PM


too much...your liver...

How sure are those taxing to my liver?
Any ways for me to reduce the damages?

take less, take only your favs
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#15 Duchykins

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Posted 02 August 2014 - 07:30 PM

I'm finding it odd that you scratched out nightly melatonin because regular use can mess with your own production, but you'll take picamilon and sulbutiamine 3 times every day and phenibut every morning.


As you reported in your other thread, you are getting tired after being on this stack for a few weeks. I was actually looking for you to say something like that because I have a hard time believing most people over 30 can have a regimen like this for a month or more withou it taxing their bodies and leaving them exhausted and compromising their sleep quality. Time =/= quality.

My suggestion would be to ditch your night stack, remove everything but the whey blend, MSM/glucosamine, phosphatidylserine, move your phenibut dose to nighttime if you must have it daily, and see how that goes for you after a week.

If that's not helping then revisit your exercise regimen. If that doesn't work, remove the racetams and pept. You are stressing your body and brain, and there is no such thing as healthy/good stress. It's very unlikely you can keep this up for a month or more without compromising your good health somewhere.

Good luck.

Edited by Duchykins, 02 August 2014 - 07:31 PM.


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#16 ironfistx

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Posted 04 August 2014 - 02:35 PM

Don't tkae Phenibut e very day. In fact, you probably shouldn't even take it at all. You can mess up, well, just check out some of the horror results people have had from taking it regularly.





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