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Nervousness, Anxiety, IBS

nervousness anxiety ibs

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#1 chris87

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Posted 13 October 2014 - 09:18 PM


I just wanted to see if anyone can give me input.  I don't know what exactly is wrong with me, but I guess it's some type of anxiety.  During the work week, I wake up with an uncomfortable feeling in my stomach almost everyday.  It is usually the worst in the morning and will often subside slightly as the day goes on.  Other times, I am uncomfortable the entire day and have GI discomfort.  I'm always stressed out, because I don't know how I will feel on a specific day.  It seems to be mental and triggered by my thoughts.  For whatever reason, I am significantly better on the weekends and on Fridays (I guess I feel better on Fridays, because I don't have work the following day).

 

I don't understand why my gut is so sensitive to my thoughts.  Even routine things will cause discomfort.  I can barely do anything, because I'm afraid of making myself sick.  It can be something as silly as reading a book, browsing the web, etc.  As soon as I say to myself that I am going to do one of these things, I'll feel my gut starting to cramp.  It's crazy, and it makes absolutely no sense to me.  When I'm at work, I basically have to sit at my desk and just focus on work.  If I decide to check my bank account, research something, or read an article online, my gut responds negatively.  Is this some type of IBS?

 

I know this sounds absolutely ridiculous.  I am so frustrated, because it prevents me from doing things that I want to do.  I'm not sure if it's relevant, but I have ADHD and OCD.  I have some degree of Social Anxiety, but it is nowhere near as severe as it used to be (I'd estimate 70% improvement).

 

I really don't want to take an SSRI.  I tried one a few years ago, and it did not work well.  I was thinking about trying Tianeptine, but I would have to order it online.

 

Does anyone have any suggestions?

 

 


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#2 StevesPetRat

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Posted 13 October 2014 - 11:06 PM

Try a gluten free, low FODMAP diet for a couple weeks. The gut-brain axis flows both ways, ya know.

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#3 chris87

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Posted 13 October 2014 - 11:50 PM

I actually follow a gluten free diet already.  Surprisingly, I don't seem to be affected by specific foods (it seems like most people talk about trigger foods when referencing IBS).  For me, I'm affected by my thoughts/mind.  Things that shouldn't be anxiety provoking (browsing the web, reading, etc) cause a GI reaction.  I just wish I could turn off that connection.  It's so frustrating.



#4 Plasticperson

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Posted 14 October 2014 - 12:16 AM

prescript assist supplement.. problem solved



#5 chris87

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Posted 14 October 2014 - 02:12 AM

prescript assist supplement.. problem solved

 

Would this actually help ease the brain/gut anxiety or whatever my issue is?  My understanding is that probiotics assist more with digestive concerns.  I don't really feel like that's the problem.  It's more of an issue where certain thoughts trigger an uncomfortable GI reaction.  I don't know how to stop/fix it.



#6 Plasticperson

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Posted 14 October 2014 - 02:21 AM

does it feel like your stomach jumps and spasms in the upper left quadrant... if so take prescript assist and ashwagahnda. It also possible you have a candida overgrowth or sibo. both are caused by stress.



#7 chris87

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Posted 14 October 2014 - 11:56 AM

I say stomach, but I guess it's more like the large intestine.  It feels much lower than my stomach.  Would Ashwagagnda/prescript assist help for this?



#8 Logic

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Posted 14 October 2014 - 08:32 PM

Pro serotonergic prebiotics/probiotics - Nutrition - LONGECITY

Prebiotic feeding elevates hippocampal BDNF - Supplements ...

Probiotics & Cognition - Lactobacillus on Sauerkraut for + ACh ...

Gut microbes linked to mental/cognitive performance - Brain Health ...

http://www.google.co...s mental health

#9 StevesPetRat

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Posted 14 October 2014 - 11:50 PM

For me, I'm affected by my thoughts/mind.  Things that shouldn't be anxiety provoking (browsing the web, reading, etc) cause a GI reaction.

Are you quite sure it works in the order you thought? A lot of that stuff really shouldn't provoke anxiety. I, too, thought my IBS was psychosomatic -- but once I fixed it, I got several months of relief from my anxiety, before a bunch of other stuff happened to bring it back.

Anyway, what could it hurt to try a really simple, irritant-free diet like meat, white rice and/or berries, lettuce, and fat for a couple weeks? (Well, unless you have phenol / salicylate intolerance, then the berries are not so good. And white rice does bother a few people.) The most restrictive diets are actually quite easy, because they remove the "decision fatigue" aspect of choosing food.

Your doctor is unlikely to know squat about diets for IBS, unless you live in Australia where they came up with a bunch of these diets, or go to an integrative gastroenterologist.

Nevertheless, even if you remain convinced that it's purely anxiety triggering your guts, I'd still recommend you try a simple, proven probiotic like Align (it's just one strain of b. infantis I think), as modulating the gut microbiome can improve anxiety, too.

#10 Saintless

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Posted 15 October 2014 - 01:52 AM

I went through a similar episode of high anxiety and developed IBS among other symptoms. I had health anxiety once I got checked out by a doctor and had tests done and they came back fine I relaxed and it all went away on its own within a few days.

 

I do now take Valerian Root + St Johns Wort for anxiety and depression, and changed my thinking patterns to reduce anxiety. This has been moderately helpful.


Edited by Saintless, 15 October 2014 - 01:58 AM.


#11 chris87

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Posted 15 October 2014 - 05:52 PM

 

For me, I'm affected by my thoughts/mind.  Things that shouldn't be anxiety provoking (browsing the web, reading, etc) cause a GI reaction.

Are you quite sure it works in the order you thought? A lot of that stuff really shouldn't provoke anxiety. I, too, thought my IBS was psychosomatic -- but once I fixed it, I got several months of relief from my anxiety, before a bunch of other stuff happened to bring it back.

Anyway, what could it hurt to try a really simple, irritant-free diet like meat, white rice and/or berries, lettuce, and fat for a couple weeks? (Well, unless you have phenol / salicylate intolerance, then the berries are not so good. And white rice does bother a few people.) The most restrictive diets are actually quite easy, because they remove the "decision fatigue" aspect of choosing food.

Your doctor is unlikely to know squat about diets for IBS, unless you live in Australia where they came up with a bunch of these diets, or go to an integrative gastroenterologist.

Nevertheless, even if you remain convinced that it's purely anxiety triggering your guts, I'd still recommend you try a simple, proven probiotic like Align (it's just one strain of b. infantis I think), as modulating the gut microbiome can improve anxiety, too.

 

 

I think it is my thoughts causing the GI distress. It really seems that way. I can be feeling well, and as soon as I decide to do something, I get a nasty GI reaction. I don't for the life of me understand it. It's making my life so difficult, because I try to avoid anything that will trigger these symptoms. If I'm at work, and it's slow, I can't even browse the web. Doing that has a GI effect, and it causes me discomfort. I literally have to sit and do nothing, so I don't make myself sick.

 

I feel like diet has improved my symptoms nominally (I eat plant-based/whole foods with no gluten, meat, dairy, etc).

 

I ordered Ashwagandha, so I will try that. I was thinking about also buying prescript assist. I wish it was slightly cheaper, but at this point, I'm willing to spend the money.


Edited by chris87, 15 October 2014 - 05:53 PM.


#12 Application

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Posted 15 October 2014 - 06:42 PM

I actually follow a gluten free diet already.  Surprisingly, I don't seem to be affected by specific foods (it seems like most people talk about trigger foods when referencing IBS).  For me, I'm affected by my thoughts/mind.  Things that shouldn't be anxiety provoking (browsing the web, reading, etc) cause a GI reaction.  I just wish I could turn off that connection.  It's so frustrating.

 

Its certainly possible that GI symptoms can be caused by psychological reactions. The gut is influenced by the same neurotransmitters that effect our brain. I'm not sure if this points to any specific treatments, but substances that effect serotonin, dopamine or the cholinergic systems can effect both gut and mind.

 

The enteric nervous system (ENS) or intrinsic nervous system is one of the main divisions of the nervous system and consists of a mesh-like system of neurons that governs the function of the gastrointestinal system....

...The enteric nervous system also makes use of more than 30 neurotransmitters, most of which are identical to the ones found in CNS, such as acetylcholinedopamine, and serotonin. More than 90% of the body's serotonin lies in the gut, as well as about 50% of the body's dopamine,...

 Source: http://en.wikipedia...._nervous_system



#13 chris87

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Posted 16 October 2014 - 12:42 AM



I actually follow a gluten free diet already. Surprisingly, I don't seem to be affected by specific foods (it seems like most people talk about trigger foods when referencing IBS). For me, I'm affected by my thoughts/mind. Things that shouldn't be anxiety provoking (browsing the web, reading, etc) cause a GI reaction. I just wish I could turn off that connection. It's so frustrating.

Its certainly possible that GI symptoms can be caused by psychological reactions. The gut is influenced by the same neurotransmitters that effect our brain. I'm not sure if this points to any specific treatments, but substances that effect serotonin, dopamine or the cholinergic systems can effect both gut and mind.

The enteric nervous system (ENS) or intrinsic nervous system is one of the main divisions of the nervous system and consists of a mesh-like system of neurons that governs the function of the gastrointestinal system....

...The enteric nervous system also makes use of more than 30 neurotransmitters, most of which are identical to the ones found in CNS, such as acetylcholine, dopamine, and serotonin. More than 90% of the body's serotonin lies in the gut, as well as about 50% of the body's dopamine,...

Source: http://en.wikipedia...._nervous_system
I do know that when I had taken Concerta for ADHD, it almost completely eliminated this problem. Maybe it has something to do with what you've mentioned.

#14 Godof Smallthings

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Posted 16 October 2014 - 11:06 AM

The amplification of negative emotions tends to occur when we dislike them and struggle against them.

 

Perhaps counter-intuitively, to instead examine the tactile inner and outer sensations that make up the physical emotion, and entering into a careful but relaxed non-thinking observation of it, already tends to reduce the intensity the emotion and loosen its grip.

 

There are a few tricks to this - bring the attention to the very moment that is actually occurring, and follow closely without slipping into thinking about the sensation that occurred a little while ago, or anticipate how the feeling will change in the future. Just stay with it, and watch it undulate and change. Because everything does. 

 

Do so with the same type of attitude a really brilliant mother would have towards her baby, i.e. friendly, playful, genuinely interested, compassionate. Once your attention is established in the now, calmly observe how the experience keeps shifting and changing. See if you can do so without putting words to the experience. Just feel and observe, and follow.

 

If at some point you find that your muscles (perhaps shoulders, jaw, legs) are tense, just gently relax them. Then redirect attention to what is happening with the physical manifestation of the emotion.

 

It can be a little tricky at first, but to adopt that shift of perspective really helps me. You can apply the method to any emotion or sensation, whether happy or sad, painful or pleasant. It keeps me grounded in the body.

 

I really hope that method is helpful to you too in some way.


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#15 chris87

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Posted 19 October 2014 - 11:44 PM

I've been taking 2 400mg Ashwagahnda, but it hasn't seemed to have any effect on this issue.  Maybe I should try taking more?  I'm getting so frustrated that I'm nearly tempted to get my Prozac script filled (as much as I despite the thought of taking an SSRI).  I'm also thinking about trying ADHD meds again, as much as I hate them.  When I took Concerta, I wasn't nearly as nervous, my social anxiety was reduced, my OCD was nearly eliminated (ironically), and I wasn't obsessed with death/aging.  I actually felt like doing things, and thinking/motivation weren't so difficult.  I'm really tired of struggling.  I guess I could also try ordering Tianeptine.



#16 Steve Zissou

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Posted 20 October 2014 - 03:56 AM

The only time I have experienced IBS symptoms is when I tried nmboe. This makes me think serotonin is involved somehow.



#17 Logic

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Posted 21 October 2014 - 12:38 AM

Pro serotonergic prebiotics/probiotics - Nutrition - LONGECITY

Prebiotic feeding elevates hippocampal BDNF - Supplements ...

Probiotics & Cognition - Lactobacillus on Sauerkraut for + ACh ...

Gut microbes linked to mental/cognitive performance - Brain Health ...

http://www.google.co...s mental health


Chriss87 the above links are all to local threads that show that your symptoms can all be cured by taking the right prebiotic fiber to create the correct environment in the gut for specific gut bacteria.
Taking some of the probiotics mentioned in these threads will sort out your mental issues and IBS.

Don't underestimate the gut as an organ; it contains neurons and there are 10X as many bacteria in your gut than cells in your body.
We are living on bacteria excrement. Its a damn good idea to make sure you approve of the bacteria whose 'shit' you are living on.
:)
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#18 Ark

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Posted 21 October 2014 - 03:26 AM

Try ginger supplements.

#19 LDK

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Posted 21 October 2014 - 07:19 AM

Agave Syrup with Yoghurt with added bifidobacterium sp. Lactobacillus acidophilus.

Agave Syrup is very high in FOS (fructo-oligo-saccharides) and serves as a preferred substrate for these benifical bacteria.

 

Also, if you wake up with a bad feeling in the morning it seems to me that your HPA axis hypersensitive. This can be reason for you anxiety and nervousness.

Some quick fixes for the HPA axis.

 

1. Vitamin C 1000 mg

2. Rhodiola Rosea (before sleep) 500 mg 3% rosavin 1% salidroside

3. Creatine 5 g. per dag

4. Sunflower seeds or melatonin pills. Remember, sunflower seeds are very high in tryptophan. When u charge your tryptophan system over 4 weeks you won't be so anxious anymore.

Also to synthesise melatonin from typtophan naturally, you need all the mineral co-factors, vitamin b5 (also in the seeds), that's why I suggest sunflower seeds.

And try to block the 'blue light' from any screen or light source, to induce melatonin from serotonin in the pineal gland.

5. Try to limit bad habits and substitute for light/moderate exercise.


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#20 Godof Smallthings

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Posted 21 October 2014 - 10:18 AM

In my case, rhodiola supplementation caused less sleep over time, and a sort of anxious energy that was not very pleasant, so I ended up discontinuing supplementation. However, the very same rhodiola product has been effective in my wife and her colleague for reducing stress in a very intense work environment, so it really seems to work quite differently in different people.

 

Thanks for the information on sunflower seeds - I have mixed them into my morning smoothie because I thought must be generally useful, but never took the time to find out in what way. Given your info, maybe they would be better suited for an afternoon or evening smoothie instead?

 

Number 5 is not always easy to implement, but when successful, causes dramatic positive changes.



#21 Hip

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Posted 23 October 2014 - 07:30 PM

When you get IBS, this can quite often cause generalized anxiety disorder (GAD) to appear alongside the IBS (ref: here). 

 

If you want some non-drug approaches to treating this anxiety that have proved very effective, see this thread:

 

Completely eliminated my severe anxiety symptoms with three supplements!

 

 

 

Note that IBS can be caused by the intestinal protozoan parasites Giardia lamblia, Blastocystis hominis and Dientamoeba fragilis, all of which are treatable with antimicrobials to an extent.



#22 AlexCanada

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Posted 15 May 2015 - 04:09 AM

Anyone have suggestions on things to try for IBS or general gut health?  I also deal with anhedonic apathetic depression with cognitive problems and terribly poor motivation. Plus I have had Resveratrol damage 2 years ago and Accutane poisoning over a decade ago (which is when severe depression/anxiety + IBS started). Recently been having some intense acidic burning sensations in my stomach on and off. Sometimes hours after eating when I am laying in bed or when I wake up. Possibly due to low blood sugar but I am not certain. Long gradual valium withdrawal may be exacerbating my symptoms.  Also extremely profound reactions to even tiny doses of magnesium causing me strong physical anxiety. Lot of food sensitivities and eating fruits and certain sugary foods often cause me to have strong body chilling sensations for up to several hours. 

 

But for general gut health and IBS....

 

I am considering getting Wheatgrass.  Not sure what else though. Collostrum worth it?? Strongly considering buying it too.      Gabapentin has some strong benefits for IBS and puts me in a much more pleasant mood but it's a bit of a stupor inducing medication. 

 

I know there is something seriously wrong with my gut but not sure what to try next. Digestive Enzymes make me feel dysphoric. DGL does the same. Probiotics sometimes improve mood but often make me feel worse. Maybe due to candida die off or just crowding out bad bacteria. Who knows. Maybe I need to try them again sometime. L-Glutamine makes me have more thoughts in my head and bit more energy but mood feels bit more negative for some reason.  

 

I really want to treat IBS and restore proper gut flora. Any suggestions would be greatly appreciated! 

 

 

 


Edited by AlexCanada, 15 May 2015 - 04:42 AM.


#23 Hip

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Posted 15 May 2015 - 04:12 AM

 

Anyone have suggestions on things to try for IBS or general gut health?

 

 

 

Might be of interest:

IBS Improved After Removing Chloramine (Not the Same as Chlorine) From My Drinking Water 


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#24 health_nutty

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Posted 16 May 2015 - 04:09 AM

I had anxiety that centered on my stomach.  I would throw up from the anxiety (almost purely mental).  You know what cured it?  Full body weight training.  Squats, deadlifts, bench, pullups, rows, etc.  Crushed my anxiety, I just needed an outlet that would *completely* exhaust me.    



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#25 kurdishfella

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Posted 30 April 2022 - 05:53 PM

 

 

More than 90% of the body's serotonin lies in the gut, as well as about 50% of the body's dopamine,...but do not bypass the BBB.

You wouldn't want them to go into your brain otherwise you'd get serotonin syndrome. Your brain makes just as much as it needs if body taken care of properly by nutrients. 







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