• Log in with Facebook Log in with Twitter Log In with Google      Sign In    
  • Create Account
  LongeCity
              Advocacy & Research for Unlimited Lifespans

Photo
* * * * * 1 votes

Human Growth Hormone for neurogenesis & brain health

human growth hormone hgh neurogenesis brain health

  • Please log in to reply
78 replies to this topic
⌛⇒ write a quiz!

#1 playground

  • Guest
  • 454 posts
  • 12
  • Location:Zurich, Switzerland
  • NO

Posted 23 September 2015 - 04:51 AM


Hello people,

 

I want to start this thread in order to explore the whole topic of Human Growth Hormone (HGH)

and it's effect upon neurogenesis and brain health more generally.

 

We know of-course that HGH will make your whole body grow.

However there is accumulating evidence that it has a significant effect upon neurogenesis

and hence could be treatment for dementia diseases, brain trauma and generic cognitive deficits.

 

I have been reading that celebrities have been (not so) secretly using HGH in order to

restore the muscle mass and return their fat:muscle ratios back to levels of their 20s or 30s.

I find this interesting.  How much HGH is taken to achieve this effect, i wonder.

 

Dear Reader, please feel free to donate your knowledge on these topics to this thread.

 

regs

 

Playground

 

PS....Some links on the relationship between HGH (and IGF-1) on neurogenesis

Role of the growth hormone/insulin-like growth factor 1 axis in neurogenesis.
http://www.ncbi.nlm....pubmed/19955757

Growth hormone signaling and hippocampal neurogenesis: insights from genetic models.
http://www.ncbi.nlm....pubmed/18566962

IGF-1/IGF-R Signaling in Traumatic Brain Injury: Impact on Cell Survival, Neurogenesis, and Behavioral Outcome.
http://www.ncbi.nlm....pubmed/26269893

 

 


Edited by playground, 23 September 2015 - 04:52 AM.


#2 gamesguru

  • Guest
  • 2,612 posts
  • 364
  • Location:coffeelake.intel.int

Posted 23 September 2015 - 06:20 AM

0hzwBvg.jpg


  • Enjoying the show x 1
  • Good Point x 1
  • like x 1
  • Agree x 1

sponsored ad

  • Advert
Click HERE to rent this advertising spot for BRAIN HEALTH to support LongeCity (this will replace the google ad above).

#3 Junk Master

  • Guest
  • 1,032 posts
  • 87
  • Location:United States

Posted 23 September 2015 - 02:00 PM

Anyone know if that "GH Gut" goes away over time/lack of use/training?

 

I wonder if Barry Bonds head is any smaller?  Lol...



#4 platypus

  • Member
  • 2,295 posts
  • 234
  • Location:Italy

Posted 23 September 2015 - 02:12 PM

These days there are many peptides that cause a release of real HGH. I wonder if they are safer than HGH itself. 

 

ps. in order to generate a HGH-gut one needs to abuse the hormone and use suprafysiological doses. reasonable doses would be the way to go. 


  • like x 1
  • Agree x 1

#5 gamesguru

  • Guest
  • 2,612 posts
  • 364
  • Location:coffeelake.intel.int

Posted 23 September 2015 - 02:18 PM

I've heard about 50-60% is permanent growth, so huge guts will always be big (unless they do organ transplants or some shiz).

 

The question is, is the dose for cognitive benefits much lower than what bodybuilders use?  If so, they should all have like Nobel prizes.


Edited by gamesguru, 23 September 2015 - 02:20 PM.

  • Ill informed x 1

#6 Junk Master

  • Guest
  • 1,032 posts
  • 87
  • Location:United States

Posted 23 September 2015 - 06:33 PM

Ok, so some bodybuilders will admit to taking 12 i.u's of growth a day, which means there are some taking even more!

 

Nuts.



#7 playground

  • Topic Starter
  • Guest
  • 454 posts
  • 12
  • Location:Zurich, Switzerland
  • NO

Posted 23 September 2015 - 10:27 PM

Hi

 

Here's the graph of the decline in growth hormone in humans:

growth_Hormone_Decline.jpg

 

http://postimg.org/image/y78jcjn7r/

 

It looks to me like anyone over 40 might reasonably add 200 mcg of HGH to restore their

levels to those of their 20s or 30s.

 

Does anyone know how many mcg are in 1IU of HGH ? 

 

I want to compare 200 mcg with the 12 IU's cited in the post above.

 

playground

 

 


Edited by playground, 23 September 2015 - 10:34 PM.

  • Informative x 1

#8 gamesguru

  • Guest
  • 2,612 posts
  • 364
  • Location:coffeelake.intel.int

Posted 23 September 2015 - 11:50 PM

looks like it drops off between ages 10-25, then stays stable.  kind of what i expect given that physical growth drops off/stops at age 18-25.

3IU = 1mg


Edited by gamesguru, 23 September 2015 - 11:51 PM.


#9 playground

  • Topic Starter
  • Guest
  • 454 posts
  • 12
  • Location:Zurich, Switzerland
  • NO

Posted 24 September 2015 - 12:03 AM

Thanks gamesguru,

 

do you have a link for this  3IU = 1mg statistic ?



#10 playground

  • Topic Starter
  • Guest
  • 454 posts
  • 12
  • Location:Zurich, Switzerland
  • NO

Posted 24 September 2015 - 02:50 AM

Here's an interesting website:

http://www.somatropin.cn/dosage.html

 

 

QUOTE:

How do I properly use HGH? What dosage should I take?

Question:

How do I properly use HGH? What dosage should I take?

 

Answer:

Human growth hormone is measured in IU (international units) and mg (milligrams). 1 mg equals approximately 3 IU while 1 IU equals approximately 0.33 mg.

The dosage depends on the goal. People generally use 2 IU per day for anti aging purposes, between 4 to 6 IU for bodybuilding, weight loss and fitness, between 8 to 16 IU is used for short duration to treat severe burns or recover after injuries.

 

Doses below 3IU per day usually bring no side effects while people can notice the improvement of their skin, better sleep, more energy, eating junk food without gaining weight, etc.

After several weeks at 4IU and above some people will start to feel some side effects of somatropin. Slight water retention can be noticed in your fingers, toes and face (HGH makes the muscle cells hold more water and are thus temporarily inflated). Some people occasionally feel tingling sensation in their fingers and palms - this is known as carpal tunnel syndrome. It is described in detail in the "effects of HGH" section. In practice carpal tunnel syndrome is the only side effect which actually bothers the user. Most athletes simply ignore it and continue the cycle for as long as they can. If the carpal becomes unbearable, they lower the dose or discontinue use until the side effects are gone. It usually takes about 2-3 weeks for the carpal tunnel syndrome to completely disappear.

 

When using 4IU and above, it is good to split the dose in two daily injections. Half in the morning and the other half in late afternoon. You should avoid taking HGH before bedtime because the body releases its endogenous HGH (3rd dose) when you falls asleep. If you take the dose before bedtime it might interfere with your endogenous HGH release.

 

 

I wonder if these HGH figures are really just an indirect measure of physical activity.

On average, people become increasingly inactive as they get older, (of-course, there are exceptional individuals).

And we know that physical activity generally raises HGH levels.

 

The average level of HGH ranges between 800mcg at age 20 and 400mcg age 30.

It seems to me, that for most people, aged over 50,

200mcg would be sufficient to raise HGH levels to the levels of your 30s.

This is based off a simple reading of the chart presented in my earlier post (2 or 3 posts up).

 

The website above is suggesting 666mcg for 'anti-aging'. But that would put most people over

50 on 866mcg.  That would be more than an average 20 year old gets !

 

Who has published these guidelines ?  Could it be the manufacturers ? 

i.e. The very people who are likely to benefit by the sale of this product ?

 

Common sense suggests to me that an average 30 year old isn't deficient

in HGH. The average HGH level for a 30 year old is 400mcg.

 

It seems to me that a 40 year old, with an average level of HGH of 300mcg

Only needs 100mcg to bring him/her upto the HGH level of a 30 year old.

So that would be (less than) 1/3 of 1IU.

 

A 50 year old only needs 200 mcg to bring his/her HGH up to 400mcg.

So that would be (less than) 2/3 of 1IU.

 

I wonder if the 2IU recommendation expresses a desire for profit,

rather than any concerns for the good health of customers.

 

But returning to this 'HGH levels are an indirect measure of physical activity' hypothesis

I would like to see studies of the HGH levels of marathon runners, iron man & triathalon participants.

I wonder if someone has already done these studies... nicely tabulated by age and sex.

 

If anyone knows of such studies please let me know. 

 

I would be very grateful.

 

playground

 

 

 


Edited by playground, 24 September 2015 - 02:54 AM.


#11 playground

  • Topic Starter
  • Guest
  • 454 posts
  • 12
  • Location:Zurich, Switzerland
  • NO

Posted 24 September 2015 - 03:03 AM

Thanks to gamesguru for supplying this link on the use of HGH

(it specifies details on storage, reconstitution and measuring of HGH)

 

http://www.hgh.com.m...how_to_use.html

 

 



#12 playground

  • Topic Starter
  • Guest
  • 454 posts
  • 12
  • Location:Zurich, Switzerland
  • NO

Posted 24 September 2015 - 07:11 AM

The focus of this thread is HGH and neurogenesis (and brain health more generally)

 

I found this on Wikipedia:

source:  https://en.wikipedia...ysical_exercise

 

 

QUOTE:

IGF-1 signaling

IGF-1 is a peptide that mediates some of the effects of growth hormone and acts through the IGF-1 receptor to control body growth and tissue remodeling.[21] In the brain, IGF-1 functions as a neurotrophic factor that, like BDNF, plays a significant role in cognition, neurogenesis, and neuronal survival.[14][22][23] Physical activity is associated with increased levels of serum IGF-1, which is known to contribute to neuroplasticity along with locally produced IGF-1 in the brain due to its capacity to cross the blood–brain barrier in the capillary bed and blood–cerebrospinal fluid barrier;[4][14][21][22] consequently one review noted that IGF-1 is a key mediator of exercise-induced adult neurogenesis, while a second review characterized it as a factor which links "body fitness" with "brain fitness".[21][22] The amount of IGF-1 released during exercise is positively correlated with exercise intensity and duration.[24]

 

 

Another wikipedia quote:

source:  https://en.wikipedia...growth_factor_1

 

QUOTE:

IGF-1 is a primary mediator of the effects of growth hormone (GH). Growth hormone is made in the anterior pituitary gland, is released into the blood stream, and then stimulates the liver to produce IGF-1. IGF-1 then stimulates systemic body growth, and has growth-promoting effects on almost every cell in the body, especially skeletal muscle, cartilage, bone, liver, kidney, nerves, skin, hematopoietic cell, and lungs. In addition to the insulin-like effects, IGF-1 can also regulate cell growth and development, especially in nerve cells, as well as cellular DNA synthesis

 

 

Which for me raises the following questions:

 

1.  Does this mean that there are _no_ HGH receptors in the brain ?

2.  What does HGH do in the brain?  Does it _not_ directly cause neurogenesis ?

 

Anyone with any links that bare on these questions, I'd be very grateful if you could post them here.

 

regards

 

playground


Edited by playground, 24 September 2015 - 07:58 AM.

  • WellResearched x 1

#13 gamesguru

  • Guest
  • 2,612 posts
  • 364
  • Location:coffeelake.intel.int

Posted 24 September 2015 - 01:38 PM

But I wouldn't jump to any conclusions, experience dictates monster bodybuilders aren't significantly smarter than average.

Growth hormone in the brain: characteristics of specific brain targets for the hormone and their functional significance.
During the past decade studies have shown that growth hormone (GH) may exert profound effects on the central nervous system (CNS). For instance, GH replacement therapy was found to improve the psychological capabilities in adult GH deficient (GHD) patients. Furthermore, beneficial effects of the hormone on certain functions, including memory, mental alertness, motivation, and working capacity, have been reported. Likewise, GH treatment of GHD children has been observed to produce significant improvement in many behavioral problems seen in these individuals. Studies also indicated that GH therapy affects the cerebrospinal fluid levels of various hormones and neurotransmitters. Further support that the CNS is a target for GH emerges from observations indicating that the hormone may cross the blood-brain barrier (BBB) and from studies confirming the presence of GH receptors in the brain. It was previously shown that specific binding sites for GH are present in discrete areas in the CNS of both humans and rats. Among these regions are the choroid plexus, hippocampus, hypothalamus, and spinal cord. The density of GH binding in the various brain regions was found to decline with increasing age. More recently, we were able to clone and determine the structure of several GH receptors in the rat and human brain. Although the brain receptor proteins for the hormone were shown to differ in molecular size compared to those present in peripheral tissues the corresponding transcripts did not seem to differ from their peripheral congeners. GH receptors in the hypothalamus are likely to be involved in the regulatory mechanism for hormone secretion and those located in the choroid plexus have been suggested to have a role in the receptor-mediated transport of GH across the BBB. The functions mediated by the GH receptors identified in the hippocampus are not yet known but recently it was speculated that they may be involved in the hormone's action on memory and cognitive functions.


  • Informative x 1
  • like x 1

#14 Area-1255

  • Guest
  • 1,515 posts
  • 2
  • Location:Buffalo,NY

Posted 24 September 2015 - 03:58 PM

Moderation note:

 

The contents of this post and some that follow were likely the result of viral marketing. Please report viral marketing where you see it as LongeCity requires that all advertisements be paid and done in line with our sponsorship policies rather than being viral marketing or such things. The community's help in this matter is much appreciated and helps us expand our advocacy and research activities.


Edited by YOLF, 07 October 2015 - 11:40 PM.


#15 Junk Master

  • Guest
  • 1,032 posts
  • 87
  • Location:United States

Posted 24 September 2015 - 05:57 PM

I'm not so sure it's the insulin that causes "GH gut."

 

What about the insulin resistance caused by the massive, and I mean massive amounts of GH these guys are taking?

 

We are NOT talking life extension here for sure.

 

Now, knowing bodybuilders like I do, I'm sure they are spiking as much insulin as they can too so the argument turns "chicken or egg" pretty quickly.

 

I've seen plenty of former bodybuilders that STILL display signs of GH gut years after competition, but in quite a few of those cases they took so much growth hormone they became diabetic and still take insulin.

 

Bolstering your post, my father is a 20 plus year diabetic (no GH...lol...) and while not obese, he does have a nice little "insulin gut."

 

Thanks for your answer and the link.



#16 Junk Master

  • Guest
  • 1,032 posts
  • 87
  • Location:United States

Posted 24 September 2015 - 06:01 PM

My favorite GH GUT pic--

 

 http://www.weightgai...ide-effects.jpg

 


  • Cheerful x 2
  • Enjoying the show x 1

#17 Keizo

  • Guest
  • 336 posts
  • 22
  • Location:Sweden
  • NO

Posted 24 September 2015 - 07:41 PM

 

playground

Or you will end up just with what you injected, after your body shuts down production due elevated levels. (I don't know.)


Edited by Keizo, 24 September 2015 - 07:41 PM.


#18 playground

  • Topic Starter
  • Guest
  • 454 posts
  • 12
  • Location:Zurich, Switzerland
  • NO

Posted 24 September 2015 - 08:00 PM

Interesting.

 

I found plenty of evidence of body builders with obviously distended guts.

 

1.  I don't believe, looking at their physiques, that these people are carrying more than 5% body fat.

 

2.  The fact that GH grows *all* tissues, including internal organs, is the likely cause,

     it seems to me, of their distended guts.

 

Here are some pics that highlight this:

 

 

roncoleman1.jpg

 

 

 

hqdefault.jpg

 

 

Paco%20Bautista%20%281%29.jpg

 

 

These guys are taking 4 IUs of HGH, or perhaps 8 IUs of HGH (or perhaps more)

 

In my humble opinion, that's not a good idea. And these guys don't look better for it.

 

Pictures of bodybuilders from the 1970s and 1980s didn't look like this.

They looked better than these guys.

 

Supra-normal levels of HGH is, to my mind, not a good idea.

 

 

playground.

 

 


Edited by playground, 24 September 2015 - 08:09 PM.

  • Agree x 3

#19 Area-1255

  • Guest
  • 1,515 posts
  • 2
  • Location:Buffalo,NY

Posted 25 September 2015 - 01:37 AM

My favorite GH GUT pic--

 

 http://www.weightgai...ide-effects.jpg

Well that just ain't right!  :cool:  :excl:  :sleep:  :unsure:  :ph34r:


  • Pointless, Timewasting x 1
  • Ill informed x 1

#20 playground

  • Topic Starter
  • Guest
  • 454 posts
  • 12
  • Location:Zurich, Switzerland
  • NO

Posted 25 September 2015 - 02:29 AM

Schwarzenegger agrees too:

 

 

 



#21 gamesguru

  • Guest
  • 2,612 posts
  • 364
  • Location:coffeelake.intel.int

Posted 25 September 2015 - 02:43 AM

Brian_Buchanan.jpg

https://youtu.be/aX9bnSkVkDI?t=5m15s


  • Informative x 1
  • like x 1

#22 playground

  • Topic Starter
  • Guest
  • 454 posts
  • 12
  • Location:Zurich, Switzerland
  • NO

Posted 25 September 2015 - 03:11 AM

I have some additional questions.  Hopefully someone knowledgeable on the topic of HGH

will able to offer some answers, or offer some clues as to where answers might be found.

 

1.  What's the half life of HGH ?

 

2.  What's the half life of IGF-1 ?

 

3.  How much IGF-1 is produced from a dose of say 333 mcg of HGH ?

 

4.  Let's say you take some dose of HGH on day 1.

This will initiate whole body growth (via IGF-1).

My question is:

For how long will the trophic effects of this dose persist ?

I day, 1 week, 1 month,  6 months ?

 

5.  The number of brain cells a new born baby has rapidly increases shortly after

being born.  This is the most concentrated period of neurogenesis for humans

(probably other primates too).  Millions, or billions, of new neurons are created

during these early months.  My question is:  Is it HGH that causes that storm

of new brain cell creation ?  If not, which hormone _is_ responsible for this ?

 

Thanks to  anyone that can offer answers (or suggest avenues to pursue answers)

 

regards

 

Playground


Edited by playground, 25 September 2015 - 03:36 AM.

  • like x 2

#23 Area-1255

  • Guest
  • 1,515 posts
  • 2
  • Location:Buffalo,NY

Posted 25 September 2015 - 04:57 AM

this thread is fascinating.  :-D  :ph34r:


  • Agree x 3

#24 platypus

  • Member
  • 2,295 posts
  • 234
  • Location:Italy

Posted 25 September 2015 - 06:43 AM

How about HGH releasing peptides like CJC-1295, GHRP-6, GHRP-2, ghrelin etc.? Based on discussions on the internets people are using these and finding benefits. 



#25 normalizing

  • Guest
  • 2,692 posts
  • -95
  • Location:Warm Greetings
  • NO

Posted 03 October 2015 - 05:01 PM

Interesting.

 

I found plenty of evidence of body builders with obviously distended guts.

 

1.  I don't believe, looking at their physiques, that these people are carrying more than 5% body fat.

 

2.  The fact that GH grows *all* tissues, including internal organs, is the likely cause,

     it seems to me, of their distended guts.

 

Here are some pics that highlight this:

 

 

roncoleman1.jpg

 

 

 

hqdefault.jpg

 

 

Paco%20Bautista%20%281%29.jpg

 

 

These guys are taking 4 IUs of HGH, or perhaps 8 IUs of HGH (or perhaps more)

 

In my humble opinion, that's not a good idea. And these guys don't look better for it.

 

Pictures of bodybuilders from the 1970s and 1980s didn't look like this.

They looked better than these guys.

 

Supra-normal levels of HGH is, to my mind, not a good idea.

 

 

playground.

 

could this be related to the enormous amount of food those bodybuilders consume in order to get muscle growth? i mean, if simply taking HGH causes growth of certain tissues, adding ton of food to the mix is logically going to cause some combustion. for non-body builders just take it with very little food, simple. also, im speculating what would happen with HGH and growing huge guts and then pumping yourself with probiotics, you will become some kind of a health bomb.
 


  • Agree x 1

#26 Area-1255

  • Guest
  • 1,515 posts
  • 2
  • Location:Buffalo,NY

Posted 03 October 2015 - 07:08 PM

could this be related to the enormous amount of food those bodybuilders consume in order to get muscle growth? i mean, if simply taking HGH causes growth of certain tissues, adding ton of food to the mix is logically going to cause some combustion. for non-body builders just take it with very little food, simple. also, im speculating what would happen with HGH and growing huge guts and then pumping yourself with probiotics, you will become some kind of a health bomb.

They do often 'load' tons of carbs even if 'healthy carbs' and this further augments that Insulin response we are talking about...but HGH itself certainly DOES NOT lead to the kind of 'distension' referred here.


  • Needs references x 3

#27 normalizing

  • Guest
  • 2,692 posts
  • -95
  • Location:Warm Greetings
  • NO

Posted 03 October 2015 - 07:23 PM

so whats the most reliable best source for HGH in conclusion? i spent most time on this thread reading about the positive or negative impact it might have but now im just interested in finding the best reliable souce of it!



#28 Area-1255

  • Guest
  • 1,515 posts
  • 2
  • Location:Buffalo,NY

Posted 03 October 2015 - 09:04 PM

so whats the most reliable best source for HGH in conclusion? i spent most time on this thread reading about the positive or negative impact it might have but now im just interested in finding the best reliable souce of it!

I think that's your sarcasm in attempt to exploit a response out of me; ironically - this has already been mentioned earlier in the thread and in others with a relative lack of speculation.



#29 normalizing

  • Guest
  • 2,692 posts
  • -95
  • Location:Warm Greetings
  • NO

Posted 04 October 2015 - 04:13 AM

time is money my friend. i went through this thread and got stuck on the humorous parts of it and as i realized, i had to do other stuff as time flies fast thus missing out on any vital information for my gathering. now that im back, ill go through again quick because again, no time.

just a question before that tho, as HGH is known to enhance organs, could it be a possible penis enhancer? and please dont joke around, i dont really need it for this, but its very interesting thing for people to know.


  • Good Point x 1
  • Cheerful x 1

sponsored ad

  • Advert
Click HERE to rent this advertising spot for BRAIN HEALTH to support LongeCity (this will replace the google ad above).

#30 Area-1255

  • Guest
  • 1,515 posts
  • 2
  • Location:Buffalo,NY

Posted 04 October 2015 - 04:30 AM

 as HGH is known to enhance organs, could it be a possible penis enhancer? and please dont joke around, i dont really need it for this, but its very interesting thing for people to know.

There are some minor anecdotes but no real solid proof that it can be used for P.E - but HGH rejuvenates every cell, tissue and organ in your body and enhances pretty much every nerve impulse; so at the least  - you would have increased E.Q (erection quality) , higher libido and dramatically increased endurance..which is all consistent with what bodybuilders and other enthusiasts report. 

 

https://thinksteroid...bido.134322651/

 

Effects of Growth Hormone Review on Male Reproductive Functions

 

J Urol. 2000 Dec;164(6):2138-42.
Possible role of human growth hormone in penile erection.
Abstract
PURPOSE:

Treatment with recombinant human growth hormone in adult patients with growth hormone deficiency increases nitric oxide and cyclic guanosine monophosphate (cGMP). We examined the functional in vitro effects of recombinant human growth hormone on tissue tension and cyclic nucleotide levels of human corpus cavernosum and detected changes in growth hormone in the cavernous and peripheral blood during different phases of penile erection.

MATERIALS AND METHODS:

Relaxant responses of human corpus cavernosum were investigated using the organ bath technique. Tissue levels of cGMP were determined by a specific radioimmunoassay after dose dependent exposition of isolated human corpus cavernosum strips to recombinant human growth hormone. In 35 healthy potent volunteers blood samples were obtained simultaneously from the corpus cavernosum and cubital vein during different functional conditions of the penis, including flaccidity, tumescence, rigidity and detumescence. Penile erection was induced by audiovisual and tactile stimulation. Serum growth hormone was determined by an immunoradiometric assay.

RESULTS:

Recombinant human growth hormone elicited dose dependent relaxation of human corpus cavernosum strips in vitro. The relaxing potency of recombinant human growth hormone was paralleled by its ability to elevate intracellular levels of cGMP. In vivo the peripheral growth hormone serum profile of the respective penile conditions did not significantly differ from those of cavernous serum. The main increase in growth hormone to greater than 90% was determined during developing penile tumescence, followed by a transient decrease afterward.

CONCLUSIONS:

These results suggest that penile erection may probably be induced by growth hormone through its cGMP stimulating activity on human corpus cavernosum smooth muscle.

PMID:   11061943   [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]






Also tagged with one or more of these keywords: human growth hormone, hgh, neurogenesis, brain health

0 user(s) are reading this topic

0 members, 0 guests, 0 anonymous users