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CBS 60 Minutes and Aubrey 1/1/06


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#91 jaydfox

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Posted 02 March 2006 - 04:24 PM

Thank you for the update, Jay. Wow, when you said it was going to be a shocking surprise, you apparently weren't understating!

#92 Bruce Klein

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Posted 02 March 2006 - 05:52 PM

We are calling for a massive national and international effort to slow aging in humans under the premise that by doing so, humanity would reap a series of "Longevity Dividends"


[thumb]

http://www.cureaging.org

#93 sjayo

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Posted 02 March 2006 - 06:09 PM

Bruce: If it isn't already obvious, you're beginning to see a pattern here aren't you. This pattern will continue and it is about to escalate. However, we are certainly not calling for the cure of aging -- please don't mistake the two goals.
S. Jay Olshansky

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#94 Bruce Klein

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Posted 02 March 2006 - 06:32 PM

Jay,

Sorry, I'm always going to be pushing the envelope ;)

#95 JonesGuy

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Posted 02 March 2006 - 06:57 PM

By definition, to be successful, someone always has to be pushing the envelope

#96 JonesGuy

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Posted 02 March 2006 - 07:04 PM

SJayO, does the article mention things that 'the common person' can do to help speed the quest to slow aging?

#97 sjayo

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Posted 02 March 2006 - 07:43 PM

Q: Because we are calling on Congress to support the effort to slow aging, at an appropriate time in the future (later this year) it would probably be a good idea to encourage your representatives to support the initiative we are proposing. Believe me, we think we're pushing the envelope with our proposal.
S. Jay Olshansky

#98 Live Forever

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Posted 02 March 2006 - 07:53 PM

Can't wait!

;)

#99 kevin

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Posted 03 March 2006 - 04:05 AM

We are calling for a massive national and international effort to slow aging in humans under the premise that by doing so, humanity would reap a series of "Longevity Dividends"



However, we are certainly not calling for the cure of aging -- please don't mistake the two goals.


No doubt this is one, no.. THE most encouraging development I've heard except for the day I became aware of the Mprize..... but how much "age slowing" are you advocating then if not a potential cessation of all age related dysfunction? Just enough to let people hang onto the assurance that they don't have to worry that the last decision they may need to make could be how they want to die?

This is an evolution and one undergoing some pretty rapid punctuated development. I'm happy to see that you are part of this Jay... thanks for being open minded. Who knows what you'll be advocating in the future... you certainly have evolved in how you approach the possibility of healthy life-extension, at least in this public sense.

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#100

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Posted 03 March 2006 - 09:04 AM

Very exciting news.

I am compelled to share with you the summary of a conversation I had with someone at a dinner party who is a family medical practitioner. It basically started with his views of genotyping, stem cell therapeutics, etc, and then led to the possibility of life extending technologies that may facillitate a lifespan of 150 years. Whilst he seemed optimistic that such technologies would emerge and indeed facillitate such a lifespan he questioned why would anyone desire to live so long? He explained that the rate at which we are utilizing the world's resources and polluting the environment and the amount of hatred that is polarizing the world is promsing to make the future look like not worth living in. He also added that every great civilization has historically collapsed and this time, due to the interconnectness of the world we will see a global collapse. He was only about 32 years old and had been a practicing physician since 1999. He was intelligent, well spoken and came from a fairly affluent background. His patients include many geriatrics at the end of their life. He did not appear depressed and spoke quickly and with energy.

I must say that he had me at a loss, since I spend most of my Imortalist thinking time on biology rather than sociological or geopolitical issues. The only counterpoint I could offer was that people with the potential of an extended lifespan would be more responsible about the future.

This presentation on "Longevity Dividends" is very timely indeed.

#101 kevin

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Posted 03 March 2006 - 02:55 PM

The only counterpoint I could offer was that people with the potential of an extended lifespan would be more responsible about the future.


All the social and environmental issues encountered which your young friend described are caused by the application of short term perpsectives to long-term problems. In fact I can't think of too many perennial social ills that aren't.

The problems of resource allocation and pollution are not those that can be solved as long as people live productive lives of three decades or less. Its simply impossible to expect the level of maturity possible to achieve with our current lifespans to enable socieities to cooperate in a manner that would allow us to approach these perennial issues with the understanding that the quality our life is ultimately connected to the quality of the lives of others (in terms of sharing with others in present day, and providing a sustainable enviroment for others in the future).

The fastest way to solve these problems is to create a healthy population of individuals with long-term perspectives. This would serve to have governments making decisions, and individuals planning their lives, taking into account extended lifespans.

#102 JonesGuy

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Posted 03 March 2006 - 05:00 PM

I agree with Kevin.

I addition, with the world that your friend described, the counterpoint is that it seems to be immoral to bring new life into such a world.

We will face many social problems with longevity (a great one being that currently people 'expect' the right to retire) - but I think that long-term planning will decrease certain problems.

My expression is "people are less likely to create a mess if they expect to live in it"

#103 Live Forever

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Posted 03 March 2006 - 07:40 PM

The articles should be available online at any moment.  Frankly, I thought they would have already been published.  I have a PDF of the articles already in hand, and a hard copy of The Scientist should be available shortly as well.  I cannot make the PDF available for 90 days, but you should be able to view the articles online at any time now.

We are calling for a massive national and international effort to slow aging in humans under the premise that by doing so, humanity would reap a series of "Longevity Dividends" -- a gift to humanity from our generation to most current and all future generations.  What is new here is the articulation of the "dividends" and the "target".  I'll present this idea formally at the World Forum meeting in Oxford on the 15th of this month, but this is just the beginning of our effort to make this happen.
S. Jay Olshansky


Is it going to be available at The Scientist or New Scientist? I have been checking each every few hours, but nothing yet. I only ask because you mentioned The Scientist above, and I happened to see a reference to New Scientist on your page.


;)

#104 sjayo

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Posted 03 March 2006 - 07:52 PM

Sorry, I'm going to have to change that. It's in The Scientist.

#105 Live Forever

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Posted 03 March 2006 - 07:59 PM

It's in The Scientist.



cool, thanks for the clarify [thumb]

#106 Live Forever

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Posted 07 March 2006 - 04:55 AM

Well, the article is showing up at the url:

http://www.the-scien...com/toc/2006/3/

..but it isnt showing up when you click on the actual article, and it isnt showing up on the front page (they still show February as the current issue)

Hopefully this means they are working on it, and it will be up in the next day or so.


:)

#107 reason

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Posted 07 March 2006 - 07:52 AM

Nice to see I'm not the only person to have been looking at the March URL waiting for something to happen.

#108 Live Forever

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Posted 07 March 2006 - 08:52 AM

Nice to see I'm not the only person to have been looking at the March URL waiting for something to happen.


Yea, I have been checking it every so often hoping for some kind of change.


:)

#109 opales

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Posted 07 March 2006 - 09:17 AM

Nice to see I'm not the only person to have been looking at the March URL waiting for something to happen.


Yea, I have been checking it every so often hoping for some kind of change.
:)


Mee too [lol]

#110 Live Forever

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Posted 07 March 2006 - 10:07 AM

Gave The Scientist article its own thread (thought it deserved it)

#111 opales

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Posted 07 March 2006 - 06:59 PM

It's now online!!!!!!!!!!!!

http://www.the-scien.../2006/3/1/28/1/

Maybe we should continue discussion on the thread liveforever22 provided?

http://www.imminst.o...&f=69&t=9614&s=

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#112 waverock

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Posted 11 April 2007 - 12:41 AM

any opinion on the news from Geron, the TA-65 they say it will slow aging. Too cool

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