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Maximizing Stem Cell Proliferation

stem nad exercise nicotinamide

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#1 SearchHorizon

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Posted 17 June 2017 - 03:19 PM


It appears that there are a number of mechanisms through which  stem cell production and differentiation occur. One condition is sufficiency of NAD+. This has been discussed in a paper by Zhang. So, (1) take niacinamide or NR if you want lots of stem cells.

 

SIRT1 does its magic through HIF1 pathway, which is induced through hypoxia. This occurs when you do aerobic exercise, and you become breathless. HIF1 is then triggered and drives stem cell mobilization. This leads to the second "ingredient" for aiding stem cell mobilization: (2) Perform exercises that make you run out of breath.

 

Finally, scientists have found a link between NO (nitric oxide) production and the magnitude of stem cell pluripotency, their proliferation, and mobilization. NO production can be aided through a supplement known as citrulline malate: (3) So, take citrulline malate to increase NO (when then would drive stem cells to proliferate).

 

 

 

 

 

 


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#2 Fafner55

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Posted 17 June 2017 - 04:40 PM

SearchHorizon, could you list your references?


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#3 Turnbuckle

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Posted 17 June 2017 - 07:45 PM

Here is a summary of the Zhang paper--

 

In their recent paper published in Science, Hongbo Zhang and colleagues show that satellite cells, the progenitors for mature skeletal muscle fibres, display deficiencies in mitochondrial gene expression. Based on previous findings showing increased mitochondrial content and function with NAD+ supplementation, they treated aged mice with the NAD+ precursor NR to correct this stem cell dysfunction. Consistent with previous findings, this intervention corrected mitochondrial dysfunction and led to rejuvenation of these cells, including an increased ability to replicate and differentiate into mature muscle fibres. The rejuvenation of muscle led to increased physical performance in aged mice as well as an enhanced ability to repair muscle damage following chemical-induced muscle injury. Even in the Mdx mouse model of muscular dystrophy, NR supplementation lowered senescence in satellite cells, and improved muscle healing following chemical injury. These findings were not limited to muscle stem cells: increased neurogenesis in aged animals was also observed, suggesting that NR-mediated stem cell rejuvenation was not a tissue-specific observation.
 

http://www.nature.co.../cr201680a.html

 

The full text of the paper is here, but you must be a member of AAAS.

 

 


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#4 SearchHorizon

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Posted 17 June 2017 - 10:34 PM

As for references.

 

(1)  Turnbuckle already posted a reference to the article by Zhang and NAD+.(see above).

 

(2) Below is a paper linking SIRT1 and hypoxia (which triggers HIF1 (hypoxia inducible factor).

 

https://www.ncbi.nlm...pubmed/20620956

 

Below is a paper linking hpoxia to stem cell proliferation.

 

http://ajpheart.phys...ent/290/4/H1378

 

The stem cells are from bone marrow. From what I understand, these cells have the ability to differentiate into most tissues in the body.

 

 

(3) The connection between nitric oxide and stem cell is given by:

 

https://www.ncbi.nlm...les/PMC4404395/

 

NO production is part of exercise response. To increase its production during exercise, one can take a nitric oxide.increasing supplement. In the body building community, citrulline malate is known as THE supplement for raising nitric oxide during exercise.

 

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I note that the above protocol requires exercise, for both raising the nitric oxide level (after taking citrulline malate) and for inducing the hypoxic state.

 


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#5 ta5

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Posted 18 June 2017 - 03:14 AM

LEF has an article on Nutrients Boost Stem Cell Function and an older article

References:


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#6 SearchHorizon

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Posted 18 June 2017 - 06:29 AM

I should note that caloric restriction improves stem cell function. So, combining intermittent fasting with the above would make a lot of sense. 

 

A comment on nitric oxide. It seems that nitric oxide production is not just stimulatory for stem cell function, but appears to provide the MAIN pathway through which HIF stimulates stem cell function. If one were to try to leverage a stressor other than hypoxia to stimulate stem cell function, increasing nitric oxide would not make much sense.

 

 



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#7 ta5

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Posted 22 June 2017 - 03:10 AM

Silly question, I happened to wonder...

 

Do people with COPD, like emphysema, have tons of stem cells?



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#8 William Sterog

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Posted 22 June 2017 - 01:38 PM

Noopept provoked an additional increase in the DNA-binding activity of HIF-1 when applied in conditions of CoCl2-induced HIF- 1 stabilization. The degree of this HIF-positive effect of Noopept was shown to be concentration-dependent.

https://www.ncbi.nlm...les/PMC4837574/

 

May Noopept be useful for this purpose?


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