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ImmInst Film transcript (discussion thread)


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#31 Mixter

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Posted 11 August 2006 - 01:46 PM

111 had a lot of ?'s and I just had time for one, so I did that one. Was hard, though. This
translation was sponsored by a double dose of Life Extension Cognitex, really helped :).

Part 111 James Swayze (Member of the Cryonics Institute)
start 0:15:19 / 1:09:10
...bringing into discussion, and... I wrote a long rant and let them
have, basically, both barrels (translator comment: american figure of speech),
basically. And I expected to get a hundred flame messages the next day
and thought "why don't you try it elsewhere, dude". And to my astonishment,
the next day, people were calling me up for pledges to cover me for suspension,
for cryonics suspension. In fact, Robert C.W. Ettinger, the actual father of
cryonics was one of them.
And, long story short, they just brought me into the community, and... nobody
cared that, that I... you know, dissed them all pretty badly. And err.. and
pledges went on and on, and it got to about ten thousand dollars over the next,
well, about a year or so.
And that kind of language there (translator: 'that kind of response'). And that's when Robert kicked it in the sea (translator: 'started it'), with thirteen thousand of his own estate... with the previse, that the other twenty thousand be reached through donations.
Well, we had ten pledged for already - so we needed another ten, and it
wasn't long and it was reached, and I am fully founded for cryonics now with Cryonic Institute of Michigan.
And I have this immortal debt I can't ever repay. But I'm trying to, and
I am working with the 'Methuselah Foundation' for the M-Prize and that's:
mprize.org. And I give them a little money each month and I'm a volunteer administrator for their web site. I am just doing a small corner of it. And that's how I'm trying to to pay back a little of what people have given me.

#32 Matthias

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Posted 18 August 2006 - 12:17 PM

thx mixter, 111 really was the hardest part!

__________________________________________________________
Veneto has traveled to the Transvision2006 in Helsinki and will meet people from all over the world there,
who might be interested in the translation project too.
Native speakers, let's eliminate the most awkward ones of the remaining question marks:

__________________________________________________________
google-film-link: http://video.google....761732541483047


part 001 (DVD-start: title1 0:00:01 / google-start: 0:00:01) :
...
And if so, if we are able to overcome aging and then live forever, what will this mean for religion?
What will this mean for governments and social systems, wich relay on a noble and time their death???
...
Is this sentence of the transcript correct? and even if so, could someone please express
"wich relay on a noble and time their death" in his own words in another way?]



part 043 (DVD start: title2 0:12:28 / google-start: 0:24:27) :

Aging then is a desease affecting our DNA. It is the continous accumulation of violations both in the nuclear and the mitochondrial genome. Hard to tell which genome is more important for aging. It appeares that the nuclear genome is more important for cancer. However the mitochondrial genome may be just as important or perhaps more important for things like dabis??? or alternes???? disease. Right now ???s out but one or another aging is caused by accumulation of damage in the DNA.


part 051 (DVD start: title3 0:05:20 / google-start: 0:31:22) :

..happy to decide??? and let other people have their three score and ten,.. I rather??? they have four score or maybe six score. All those start to get energy??? at that point. I think over a hundred start to get energy.

[ 3, 10, 4 or 6 score?, energy?, err... what's he talking about?]


part 057 (DVD start: title3 0:01:04 / google-start: 0:37:33) :

The reality is most of this kind of ignore.. (MUMBLE)of??know???that??be??gall???that???livererian???(/MUMBLE) pretended we are not heading rapidly towards aging and death.. The very few right now, per??? set on a percentage basis, are taking the extremely rational step of saying, well cryonics may not be a guarantee but is certainly the most rational scientifically valued thing I can do right now to perhaps 'beat the reaver'.


part 089 (DVD start: title6 0:02:39 / google-start: 0:56:32) :

One of the central themes for me as a physicist is is asking the question: Does anything in cryonics violate the laws of physics? And the answer to that is clearly: no. There is nothing at all in the laws of physics that sais this can't happen. And so, it's important to realize that a lot of technology, that people thought were completely impractical that had insurmountable barriers, have been developed in the past hundred or two hundred years and yet people often, you know, do tractors??? of these technologies. Often meet arguments, basically to the effect that bylaws??? of physics well not strictly prohibiting??? that it's inaked??? vanishing the unlikely. So people made arguments against rocketry for example basically saying that: "There is no way, there is no way that rockets will ever get off the surface of the earth and go off to explore the planets". And they were wrong enough. And I think that it's.. if you take enormous look at the history of technological forecasting, scientists and engineers tend to be really??? bad of this sort of things.


part 103 (DVD start: title6 0:10:44 / google-start: 1:04:37) :

A reasonable back up just like when we were.. if - those of us who are in information technology: - if you are writing a long program or a long letter, a long document match??? to be in thirty or forty years that document not hitting a safe key. This is a kind of a safe key function and again now in internet??? itself??? but a reasonable insurance and of course that insurance is in turn infunded by insurance


part 114 (DVD start: title7 0:01:44 / google-start: 1:12:45) :

In order to stimulate research on the whole idea of life extension in mammals, I have been involved with a number of people, especially David Goble an ??? from umm Washington DC area. And I learned??? something called 'The Methuselah Mouse Prize', which is administered by a non profit 501©(3) and it's called the 'The Methuselah Foundation'. And the Mathuselah Mouse Prize is a very very simple concept. Just as: You get some money if you create a mouse that lives to a greater age than any other mouse who ever lived before, as far as we know. And the amount you get is determined by of course the size of the prize fond; you don't get the whole prize fond if you if you do it, what you do is you got an amount of it determined by how much you beat the previous record by.


part 116 (DVD start: title7 0:02:37 / google-start: 1:13:37) :

This is the wired thing about life extension mentality. Umm, there is a group of people who take a selfdissay???, you know; we're for this thing that most people seem to be against it. And I do really might advocate for them, but in certain literal sense everybody wants to live more and more days.


part 118 (DVD start: title7 0:03:17 / google-start: 1:14:17) :

We can talk about that for many hours or many days for that matter, but the bottom line is that.. or at least as simple as we've looked at that is that most people most of their time would rather be alive than dead and most people most of their time would be federal/further??? extend their lifes if they could. And that's all I risk??? to do??? it. It's just umm just another.. just an extension of what we've always done. Wich is to try to save and extend our lives if we can and use medical technology if that's helpful???


part 122 (DVD start: title7 0:05:14 / google-start: 1:16:14) :

To the static stand it's the same ??? industry and in the order??? real??? industry, you couldn't talk about.. You couldn't talk about hybrids or electric car for a longest time. Because we were cracked. We were not cracked, we were not able to be funded. So that just language??? to language???. And language??? into a shape??? now happens. And.. you have to build this this critical mass and I don't think the community is doing itself any great service by being quite in?? under the radar??? And an actual fact Aubrey de Grey is is pointing the way very clearly by being as loud as vocal as he is. ..And for may part, I'm really just one of a few people doing that critical little service of being a market maker for the conversation.


part 125 (DVD start: title7 0:00:53 / google-start: 1:18:20) :

We believe that automatically once we attain the biological immortality wich I believe is inevitable. That will occur, that that cells will be programmed in such a way that they wont get old anymore, they won't turn into cancer, or our vascular system will maintain as youthful playable. Towns/tones??? of it there will be no more apurse???? product disease. We'll control autoimmune diseases, so rampart???. And now a little about??? people: People will live one day forever at a good healthy stage. But that risk of accident and trauma and just these unknown problems will motivate people to one ago a step further. And then that is a developed artificial intelligence that can then take our biological emotions wich are not more??? than??? chemical reactions in our brain anyway and our memories and our identitiy and transfer those into an electronic format that can then be backed up and stored in many places so that we will essentially have physical immortality the matter what happens to that primary being there will be 'backup disks' .. spread up in as many places th an you can afford to keep them stored.


part 126 (DVD start: title8 0:01:59 / google-start: 1:19:26) :

..and I became convinced that intelligence is not really such an amazingly fancy trick. That, not that it's trivial by any means, but there is a lot of ways to make an intelligent system. Nature has discovered one, which is in bio??? in the human brain. The nature discovered cannot??? have??? really. The way that nature discovered to achieve intelligence says: pluses and minuses, which we are very familiar with them. It seems to me that you could make superior intelligence to humans in digital computers. And once you have that intelligence
than all the other problem become easier, then time travel is easier, making humans immortal is easier, because you have a.. you have a superior digital mind, a different kind of digital mind, which is complementary to yours to help you discover anything you want to discover.


part 127 (DVD start: title8 0:02:48 / google-start: 1:20:15) :

And what I am hoping to catch is those three??? neurons as they developed is ??? memorized??? as spreading up, connecting up. And.. what I am hoping is that we can build modells ??? small order circuits in order to understand how the brain actually wires up and develops ??? and stores information from watching things like this. Because it's sitting of a top of electro??? to we can also observe them electrically. So we can see all the electrical activity in the network. And we can see the physical structure, thats ???. And so I am working on ??? to integrate that information so that we can build models to get a better understanding.. how.. the cortex the ??? cortex actually work. These are my cells???.


part 147 (DVD start: title8 0:16:25 / google-start: 1:33:52) :

...
I suspect before the end of this century you'll be able to going to something like a 7-11??? and pick up the latest half a dozen Ph.D.s for 2 dollars,
...

[what's a 7-11 / seven-eleven ?]


part 152 (DVD start: title9 0:02:00 / google-start: 1:36:45) :

..DNA comes into us; we emerge with the technology to live also, in that like the DNA in a sense is immortal. There are suddenly, you.. So we get our immortality with the emergent??? We extend by??? as time to live??? resources??? to then go up to the universe maybe meet with other beings. And then permeate the universe with consciousness in some way. That might be a.. a.. porse??? in the entropic forces. To figure out what we really want to do when you grow up to the space??? ..So I would see in a sense immortality as being part of a long range gender - no time intended but cause in a sense that's what matter and energy did to DNA. And thats what DNA is doing at last move in mind intelligence ???shades??? and so ??? for. So it seems to me to be not an unreasonably.. not an unreasonable position if you take the long stretch of of matter and energy in time.


part 153 (DVD start: title9 0:02:58 / google-start: 1:37:43) :

So everybody would agree with living long time. What it is, is getting people to donate their time and donate their money, that's the hard, so building the community that's that's where the problem lies as as having something concrete enough that people will invest their time or even change some of the things that they've been brought up with. I mean, that's a very hard thing, if you've been brought up as a prospertarian??? or, you know, whobudas??? so :-))) whatever, you know, you are - it's a very hard to change some of those beliefs. It's not hard for me to talk to other people about immortalism, for me it's just a natural extension. You want the best for your children. You want the best for yourself. Nobody chooses to die.


part 158 (DVD start: title9 0:06:12 / google-start: 1:40:55) :

The very fact of being able to find other people who think like you, is very very impowering for immortalists who haven't, if I can make it short???, haven't come out of the class??? yet. So you are going to the web site, you see other people thinking in a similar way as you do, you don't feel so much ashamed of your way of thinking.

__________________________________________________________

google-film-link: http://video.google....761732541483047

Edited by Matthias, 24 September 2006 - 12:03 AM.


#33 Mixter

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Posted 31 March 2007 - 02:34 PM

phew. [tung]

Hope that some translations can be made (if subtitles, at worst) soon.
Besides the ???'s there were some mis-interpretations, that didn't make sense in
english sentences, I corrected them in these parts. I feel some may be left in the rest of
the whole translation, but can probably be corrected by the translator(s) without
rehearing, in this part it was just 1-2 words at a time to change to make sense...



part 001 (DVD-start: title1 0:00:01 / google-start: 0:00:01) :
...
And if so, if we are able to overcome aging and then live forever, what will this mean for religion?
What will this mean for governments and social systems, which rely on a noble and timely death?

[COMMENT: noble death = common euphemism, alternative: "which rely on timely dead as persisting and being accepted in society"]


part 043 (DVD start: title2 0:12:28 / google-start: 0:24:27) :

Aging, then, is a disease affecting our DNA. It is the continous accumulation of mutations both in the nuclear and in the mitochondrial genome.
Hard to tell which genome is more important for aging. It would appear that the nuclear genome is more important for cancer. However, the mitochondrial
genome may be just as important, or perhaps even more important, for things like Diabetes or Alzheimers Disease. Right now, jury is out [COMMENT:
figure of speech for 'which one is true has yet to be determined'], but one or another aging is caused by accumulation of damage in the DNA.


part 051 (DVD start: title3 0:05:20 / google-start: 0:31:22) :

I'd be happy to step aside and and people have their three score and ten [year long life-spans],.. rather they'd have four score or maybe six score.
But all that starts to get a bit cheeky at that point. I think over a hundred starts to get cheeky. [COMMENT: = unrealistic]


part 057 (DVD start: title3 0:01:04 / google-start: 0:37:33) :

The reality is most of this kind of ignore is that we go on to live and pretended we are not heading rapidly towards aging and death. The very few,
right now, seen on a percentage basis, are taking the extremely rational step of saying, well cryonics may not be a guarantee but is certainly the
most rational scientifically valued thing I can do right now to perhaps 'beat the reaper'.


part 089 (DVD start: title6 0:02:39 / google-start: 0:56:32) :

One of the central themes for me as a physicist is asking the question: Does anything in cryonics violate the laws of physics? And the answer to that is clearly:
no. There is nothing at all in the laws of physics that sais this can't happen. And so, it's important to realize that a lot of technologies that people thought were
completely impractical that had insurmountable barriers, have been developed in the past hundred or two hundred years and yet people often, you know, who detract
us of these technologies, often need arguments, basically to the effect that, by laws of physics, well not strictly prohibiting it, but vanishingly unlikely.
So people made arguments against rocketry for example basically saying that: "There is no way, there is no way that rockets will ever get off the surface
of the earth and go off to explore the planets". And they were wrong enough. And I think that, if you take an honest look at the history of technological
forecasting, scientists and engineers tend to be really bad at this sort of things.


part 103 (DVD start: title6 0:10:44 / google-start: 1:04:37) :

A reasonable backup is like when we are - for those of us who are in information technology - if you are writing a long program or a long letter, a long document,
imagine for thirty or forty years in that document, not hitting the save key. This is a kind of a save key function. And again, not an end in itself, but a
reasonable insurance, and of course that insurance is in turn funded by insurance.


part 114 (DVD start: title7 0:01:44 / google-start: 1:12:45) :

In order to stimulate research on the whole idea of life extension in mammals, I have been involved with a number of people, especially David Goble, an
entrepreneur from the Washington DC area. And I learned of something called 'The Methuselah Mouse Prize', which is administered by a non profit 501©(3) and it's
called the 'The Methuselah Foundation'. And the Mathuselah Mouse Prize is a very very simple concept. Just as: You get some money if you create a mouse that lives to
a greater age than any other mouse who ever lived before, as far as we know. And the amount you get is determined by of course the size of the prize fund; you don't
get the whole prize fund if you if you do it, what you do is you got an amount of it determined by how much you beat the previous record by.


part 116 (DVD start: title7 0:02:37 / google-start: 1:13:37) :

This is the weird thing about life extension mentality. There is a group of people who take it on their self to say, you know; we're for this thing that most
people seem to be against it. And I do really might advocate for them, but in certain literal sense everybody wants to live more and more days.


part 118 (DVD start: title7 0:03:17 / google-start: 1:14:17) :

We can talk about that for many hours or many days for that matter, but the bottom line is that.. or at least as simple as we've looked at that is that most people
most of their time would rather be alive than dead and most people most of their time would prefer to extend their lives if they could. And that's all there is
to it. It's just umm just another, just an extension of what we've always done. Which is, to try to save and extend our lives if we can and use medical technology
if that's ethical.


part 122 (DVD start: title7 0:05:14 / google-start: 1:16:14) :

To a certain extend it's the same to any industry. In the automobile industry, you couldn't talk about.. You couldn't talk about hybrids or electric car for a
longest time. Because we were a crack. You were a nutcase and not eligible for funding. So that just languished and languished and languished, until it actually
now happens. And you have to build this this critical mass and I don't think the [life extension] community is doing itself any great service by being quet and
'under the radar'. And an actual fact, Aubrey de Grey is pointing the way very clearly by being as loud as vocal as he is. And for may part, I'm really just one of
a few people doing that critical little service of being a market maker for the conversation.


part 125 (DVD start: title7 0:00:53 / google-start: 1:18:20) :

We believe that, ultimately, once we attain the biological immortality wich I believe is inevitable. That will occur, that cells will be programmed in such a way
that they wont get old anymore, they won't turn into cancer, our vascular system will maintain its youthful, plyable tone, so that there will be no more
atherosclerotic disease, we'll control autoimmune diseases that are so rampant in elderly people. People will live one day forever in a good healthy state. But that
risk of accident and trauma and just these unknown problems will motivate people to go one step further. And then that is, develop artificial intelligence that can
then take our biological emotions - which are not more than chemical reactions in our brain anyway - and our memories, and our identities, and then transfer those
into an electronic format that can then be backed up and stored in many places so that we will essentially have physical immortality, no matter what happens to that
primary being, there will be 'backup disks' - spread up in as many places th an you can afford to keep them stored.


part 126 (DVD start: title8 0:01:59 / google-start: 1:19:26) :

I became convinced that intelligence is not really such an amazingly fancy trick. Not that it's trivial, by any means. But there's a lot of ways to make an
intelligent system. Nature has discovered one, which is ingrained in the human brain, that nature discovered kind of habitually. The way that nature discovered
to achieve intelligence says: pluses and minuses, which we are very familiar with them. It seems to me that you could make superior intelligence to humans in digital
computers. And once you have that intelligence than all the other problem become easier, then time travel is easier, making humans immortal is easier, because you
have a... you have a superior digital mind, a different kind of digital mind, which is complementary to yours to help you discover anything you want to discover.


part 127 (DVD start: title8 0:02:48 / google-start: 1:20:15) :

And what I am hoping to catch is, those three neurons, as they develop, their neurites [= Axons, Dendrites] as spreading up, connecting up. And, what I am hoping is
that we can build models of small cortical circuits in order to understand how the brain actually wires up and develops and learns, and stores information, from
watching things like this. Because it's sitting of a top of an electrical tube, we can also observe them electrically. So we can see all the electrical activity in
the network. And we can see the physical structure, thats how. And so I am working on ways to integrate that information so that we can build models to get a better
understanding of how the cortex, the mammalian cortex actually works. These are my cells.


part 147 (DVD start: title8 0:16:25 / google-start: 1:33:52) :

...
I suspect before the end of this century you'll be able to, going to something like a 7-11 and pick up the latest half a dozen Ph.D.s for 2 dollars,
[ http://en.wikipedia....ki/Seven_Eleven - US supermarket chain, i.e.: 7-11 = supermarket ]
...


part 152 (DVD start: title9 0:02:00 / google-start: 1:36:45) :

DNA comes into us. We emerge with the technology to live also, indefinitely, like the DNA in a sense, is immortal. In our cells, think of you. So we get our
immortality with the merger [COMMENT: probably the merger with AI]. Which then buys us time - leave the solar system, go up in the universe, maybe meet with other
beings - and then permeate the universe with consciousness in some way, that might be a pause in the entropic forces, to figure out what we really want to do when
you grow up, seriously. So I would see in a sense immortality, as being part of a long range agenda. No pun intended, but because in a sense, that's what matter and
energy did to DNA. And what DNA is doing to us, with our mind, and intelligence and the machines and so forth. So it seems to me to be not an unreasonable position
if you take the long stretch of of matter and energy in time.


part 153 (DVD start: title9 0:02:58 / google-start: 1:37:43) :

So everybody would agree with living long time. What it is, is getting people to donate their time and donate their money, that's the hard, so building the community
that's that's where the problem lies as as having something concrete enough that people will invest their time or even change some of the things that they've been
brought up with. I mean, that's a very hard thing, if you've been brought up as a presbyterian or, you know, buddhist... So, whatever - you know - you are -
it's a very hard to change some of those beliefs. It's not hard for me to talk to other people about immortalism, for me it's just a natural extension. You want the
best for your children. You want the best for yourself. Nobody chooses to die.


part 158 (DVD start: title9 0:06:12 / google-start: 1:40:55) :

The very fact of being able to find other people who think like you, is very very empowering for immortalists who haven't - if I can make it short -
haven't come out of the closet yet. So, you are going to the web site, you see other people thinking in a similar way as you do, you don't feel so
much ashamed of your way of thinking.

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#34 Matthias

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Posted 31 March 2007 - 04:36 PM

thx very much, Mixter!!!
I have put in your corrections into the transcript,
and now I am adapting the translation based on that.




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