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Toothbrush for receding gum?

receding gum

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#1 sodraguy

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Posted 10 September 2017 - 07:07 PM


Hi,

 

Does someone could advise a good toothbrush for receding gum? I currently use an Oral B electric brushtooth and Paradontax toothpaste.

 

As soon as my toothbrush is touching my gum they begin to bleed...



#2 Rich D

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Posted 10 September 2017 - 07:24 PM

Oral-B sensitive gum toothbrush head.
https://oralb.com/en...ent-brush-heads

I can personally vouch for these. Work great.

#3 aconita

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Posted 13 September 2017 - 12:01 AM

Any soft MANUAL brush, use it gently, never against the gums (but from the gums), don't keep brushing for hours, 20" is all you need.

 

But all the above will not make a great deal of a difference because you have a bacterial imbalance in your mouth, in other word an infection, pyorrhea if you prefer.

 

Those bacteria are lurking where no toothbrush can reach, below the gum line, for example.

 

Your bone is receding and gums are following, they are red and swollen, therefore you might not even be aware of to which extent they already receded.

 

A mouthwash would do far more good than any brushing at this stage and I do recommend it but there are even better solutions.

 

Have a professional tooth scaling including below gums' line currettage (this is how a curette looks like: https://www.pricefal....-GR-3-4/348762 ), no, the ultrasound scaler isn't enough for under the gum, the manual curette needs to be employed, it will cost you more because is time consuming but if all the sub gingival calculus isn't accurately removed you'll get nothing out of it, you can easily tell if the job is well done because you'll feel when the curette doesn't catch in anymore on the tooth surface (below the gums).

 

Choose a good professional to do it properly, don't be shy to ask elucidations about the intended procedure before signing in, follow the below instructions and you'll not have to repeat the experience any soon, promise (by the way, if you hear the word "surgical intervention" or "scalpel" just run as fast as you can).

 

Drop any commercial toothpaste.

 

Buy food grade hydrogen peroxide 3% or if it gets difficult to find where you live buy just common pharmacy hydrogen peroxide, buy some xantan gum powder and to be really fussy buy a bottle of steam distilled food grade mint essential oil.

 

An empty pump action cream or toothpaste dispenser would be just ideal.

 

Fill it up with hydrogen peroxide (typically about 100g), add about 1g of xantan gum powder and 5-10 drops of mint oil, place in the fridge.

 

After a few hours it is turned into perfect mint flavored tooth paste, if food grade hydrogen is used keep it ALWAYS IN THE FRIDGE and the unused left in the bottle in the freezer, if common hydrogen peroxide is used you can keep it wherever you like but away from light.

 

Difference is food grade has no preservatives in it, taste better but spoils quickly if not refrigerated.

 

Brush once a day with that.

 

If you like use hydrogen peroxide with some drops of mint oil for flavoring as a mouthwash too (no xantan gum here since you don't need it to turn into a paste).

 

In the beginning you might see white spots developing on your gums and possibly turning painful, if this happens (and likely will) give the hydrogen peroxide toothpaste a break for a couple of days switching back to commercial toothpaste, than resume the hydrogen peroxide again and so forth till no more discomfort to the gums.

 

You'll likely get used to it in about a few weeks.

 

You'll never look back at commercial toothpastes and electric brushes and your gums will be as healthy and strong as they come and more, guaranteed (with great disappointment of your dentist).


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#4 Moondancer

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Posted 15 September 2017 - 01:45 AM

Any soft MANUAL brush, use it gently, never against the gums (but from the gums), don't keep brushing for hours, 20" is all you need.

 

 

 

If you like use hydrogen peroxide with some drops of mint oil for flavoring as a mouthwash too (no xantan gum here since you don't need it to turn into a paste).

 

In the beginning you might see white spots developing on your gums and possibly turning painful, if this happens (and likely will) give the hydrogen peroxide toothpaste a break for a couple of days switching back to commercial toothpaste, than resume the hydrogen peroxide again and so forth till no more discomfort to the gums.

 

You'll likely get used to it in about a few weeks.

 

 

What about apoptosis from hydrogen peroxide?

 

If the toothbrush doesn't touch the gum dental plaque will accumulate there. Gently brushing the gums will increase bloodflow and circulation; but using a rubber spike is perhaps better for that.

 

@sodraguy

It is not often brushing too hard/too much that makes the gumline recede, but much more often bone loss (periodontitis). Bleeding gums are a telltale sign of gum disease (gingivitis) and potentially periodontitis. Professional cleaning/scaling as was mentioned here is the first important step to take. An electric toothbrush should be more effective than manual brushing. Oral B has an electric toothbrush head with extra soft bristles, you can try that one if you are really worried you are brushing your gums away, but a medium bristle brush should do fine. Just don't brush too long as was said here and don't press too hard. More important: clean the interdental spaces well! Interdental brushes do the job just fine and are much easier to use than dental floss. If you are don't clean your interdental spaces, plaque/tartar will still accumulate there, no matter how good you brush your teeth.


Edited by Moondancer, 15 September 2017 - 02:16 AM.


#5 aconita

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Posted 15 September 2017 - 02:46 AM

Apoptosis of what?

 

Any research pointing to apoptosis caused by using hydrogen peroxide as a mouthwash or toothpaste?

 

If that would have been the case I should have nothing left in my mouth after years of use, the only apoptosis has regarded gingival pockets eventually.:)

 

If the toothbrush doesn't touch the gum dental plaque will accumulate there

 

 

I don't agree, isn't the mechanical action that prevents plaque but bacterial balance, if it is just the mechanical action brushing alone should eliminate the need for scaling, which isn't the case.

 

Plus to think to be able to reach every spot and with enough force with a brush is just kidding, like between teeth or below the gums line.

 

And I am not saying to not brush the gums, I say to not brush against them, which will indeed cause recession, specifically of the elongated kind, which in turn will cause bone resorption too in an endless loop.

 

 It is not that often brushing too hard/too much that makes the gumline recede, but much more often bone loss (periodontitis)

 

I say that brushing too often and to hard is very often the cause of cavities because of enamel damaging (erosion) and gengival/bone recession.

 

Bacteria don't give a shit about brushing, hard, soft, often, seldom or never, it just makes very little difference if any.

 

Oral bacteria balance doesn't depend by brushing, in facts periodontitis prescribed treatment isn't brush more often and harder but chlorhexidine, an antibiotic.

 

But chlorhexidine causes teeth discolouration, might develop bacterial resistance, gets swallowed (even if only in tiny amounts) very negatively affecting gut microbioma and doesn't restore bacterial balance, it just wipes out everything (which isn't smart).

 

Instead of an empty territory, free for whom come first to settle in, is preferable an occupied one, occupied by the nice guys preferably, leaving little or no room at all for anyone else.

 

H2O2 in the other hand is much cheaper, much gentler, whitens teeth, wipes out only anaerobic bacteria which are the bad guys leaving alone aerobic bacteria which are the nice guys helping to restore a favorable balance and likely turns into water before reaching the guts, and even if some gets there it will again affect the anaerobic guys only, not the whole microbioma.

 

Mouth swishing some water with backing soda after each meal would provide an hostile environment for bacterial overgrowth too leading to less plaque formation, therefore if really keen brush once a day only as previously described and mouth swish after each meal with baking soda.


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#6 aconita

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Posted 15 September 2017 - 03:06 AM

clean the interdental spaces well! Interdental brushes

 

Mmmm.....this one too has been proved by research to be taken with care, forcing even slightly an interdental brush between teeth causes the interdental papilla recession leaving a bigger space which will require a bigger size interdental brush which will cause more recessionand so on.

 

Use the interdetal brush only where and if there are already big enough spaces to allow a tiny size brush to get in without forcing whatsoever and be very gentle, just pushing out eventual food bits entrapped there.

 

Again isn't the mechanical action that gets read of nasty bacteria, even scaler and curette don't get rid of bacteria, just of their houses where they hide.


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#7 Moondancer

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Posted 15 September 2017 - 03:53 AM

 
aconita, on 15 Sept 2017 - 04:46 AM, said:
Apoptosis of what?
 
Any research pointing to apoptosis caused by using hydrogen peroxide as a mouthwash or toothpaste?
 
If that would have been the case I should have nothing left in my mouth after years of use, the only apoptosis has regarded gingival pockets eventually. :)

 

 

N=1 does not make a decent study. I may as well reply that the brother of the friend of my nephew's uncle had his teeth fall out after using H202 to brush his teeth to make my point (which I won't).

 

Any research? We can't be sure, isn't that sufficient reason to not use it? https://www.ncbi.nlm...les/PMC4993923/

 

 


 

If the toothbrush doesn't touch the gum dental plaque will accumulate there

 

 

I don't agree, isn't the mechanical action that prevents plaque but bacterial balance, if it is just the mechanical action brushing alone should eliminate the need for scaling, which isn't the case.

 

Plus to think to be able to reach every spot and with enough force with a brush is just kidding, like between teeth or below the gums line.

 

And I am not saying to not brush the gums, I say to not brush against them, which will indeed cause recession, specifically of the elongated kind, which in turn will cause bone resorption too in an endless loop.

 

 

Brushing (with toothpaste), flossing/using interdental brushes, rinsing your mouth with a mouthwash, alltogether contribute to restoring the balance of oral microbes. There should be sufficient references easily found to validate that statement.

 

If you don't brush the gumline, plaque and eventually tartar will accumulate there too. If plaque and tartar have already accumulated the mechanical actions of brushing/flossing/using interdental brushes/rinsing with a mouthwas will of course indeed not eliminate the need for scaling. If however after proper scaling you do keep up with that routine of brushing, flossing/using interdental brushes, using a mouthwash, you should be able to postpone any future scaling for a good amount of time, as these mechanical actions do in fact help to restore the balance of oral microbes.



#8 Moondancer

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Posted 15 September 2017 - 04:03 AM


 

 It is not that often brushing too hard/too much that makes the gumline recede, but much more often bone loss (periodontitis)

 

I say that brushing too often and to hard is very often the cause of cavities because of enamel damaging (erosion) and gengival/bone recession.

 

Bacteria don't give a shit about brushing, hard, soft, often, seldom or never, it just makes very little difference if any.

 

Oral bacteria balance doesn't depend by brushing, in facts periodontitis prescribed treatment isn't brush more often and harder but chlorhexidine, an antibiotic.

 

 

 

I wanted to edit my post but could not do so for one reason or the other. I do agree that brushing too hard and too often of course can and does cause gengival/bone recession. More often however, bone recession is the result of periodontitis, that many people suffer from. Brushing/interdental brushing/mouthwashes are in fact the prescribed preventive measures to decrease the chance to get periodontitis as well as to halt the progression of periodontitis. Whereas an antibiotic may be the initial prescribed treatment when a patient has periodontitis (doesn't necessarily have to be the case), further treatment to halt progression of periodontitis comes down to cleaning the teeth/mouth through brushing/interdental brushing/mouthwashes.



#9 Moondancer

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Posted 15 September 2017 - 04:06 AM

 

clean the interdental spaces well! Interdental brushes

 

Mmmm.....this one too has been proved by research to be taken with care, forcing even slightly an interdental brush between teeth causes the interdental papilla recession leaving a bigger space which will require a bigger size interdental brush which will cause more recessionand so on.

 

Would like to see those studies/references.



#10 aconita

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Posted 15 September 2017 - 07:08 AM

Would like to see those studies/references.

 

This for example:

 

http://ir.tdc.ac.jp/...51/1/53_141.pdf

 

I am not the only person using H2O2 and certainly not the first, never a side effect has been reported in the literature, its use has been recommended by several proponents, odontoiatry university professors included, plenty of references.

 

Apotosis in a test tube on cell cultures is bit of a different ballgame.

 

I leave alone teeth bleaching or H2O2 for cuts and surgical practice since those aren't done everyday even if at much higher concentration or at much more delicate locations (open wounds).

 

Tartar, plaque, calculus...call it as you like, what is it, what causes it?

 

Bacteria (of the wrong kind), period.

 

Can one brush bacteria away?

 

No, otherwise we were sterilizing surgical tools by brushing, not by autoclaving.

 

How well you brush or scrape, by electrical brushes or manual ones, the result doesn't blink, bacteria aren't removed, they might diminish a bit but that doesn't last long since those buggers do multiply fast.

 

There are only two things keeping them at bay, other bacteria competing for resources and "chemical" weapons.

 

When an infection occur you can't brush it off, you need "antibiotics" of some kind, because bacteria tend to be kind of very tiny, too tiny to go after them one by one with mechanical tools/weapons, other bacteria can since are of comparable size, we can't.

 

If ones oral bacterial balance is screwed for whatever reason (and this is an interesting topic indeed) there is no amount of oral hygiene that will prevent, stop or reverse periodontitis, if the good guys are outnumbered the war is lost, medical evidence for that is there to be seen.

 

Periodontitis doesn't affect just whom doesn't brush teeth, it has nothing to do with that, as "primitive" population whom never used a tooth brush in their life with unheard periodontitis' cases do prove.

 

Oral bacterial balance is a bit more complex than dictated by the amounts of daily brush strokes.

 

In facts periodontitis is considered very difficult to treat and at very low positive outcomes in the long run, simply because root causes aren't addressed/known and an antibiotic course followed by oral hygiene "good practice" doesn't work in the vast majority of cases, than professional scaling is prescribed as often as once a month with great joy of the dentist and no succes.

 

Of course not, how long bacteria takes to buil new plaque?

 

Few hours after the most professional scaling one is back to square one, the house is already on is way to be rebuilded, population itself barely affected...

 

No big deal, eventually the patient will start loosing teeth to be replaced by implants ot prothesis,...and nobody can say we didn't try our best.

 

Been there, seen it.

 

That's why I recommend destroy theyr buildings first by scaling and curretting, follow with wiping the population down with H2O2, give a chance at the good guys to take controll of the territory and keep helping them creating a favourable environment for them and ostyle for the bad ones.

 

Electric or manual the brushing has little game there, maybe gets in the way of laying some of the first bricks....untill the mortar is not set yet but is a lost battle, in the long run they'll manage in their intent.

 

I prefer to kick the masons in the ass. :)


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#11 Moondancer

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Posted 16 September 2017 - 05:31 PM

I'm all for finding a product that can whipe out the bad guys as you put it, and positively change the oral microbiome. However: I'd want to be sure too I'm not doing harm to my teeth/oral microbiome. You seem hardpressed in your beliefs and don't want to even research the potential negatives to using H202 in a  toothpaste/mouthwash that you use daily.

 

In this study they used 10% H202 and let it sit on the teeth for 30mins. The H202 reached the dental pulp.

  • Of course you can say: that is 10%, it remained on the teeth for 30 mins!
  • But this was only for a few weeks, and you suggest to use H202 3% while brushing/rinsing the teeth daily for a prolonged period of time (permanently)!

Truth is: we don't have the exact studies you want me to post here (using 3% H202 in daily rinses) in order to take a look at these references, since they don't seem to exist. But enough points in the direction that H202 may cause harm to your teeth if used longterm. That you want to risk it: no prob. But to recommend it as the best thing ever on a forum that is frequented by many people without wanting to research these possible pitfalls...

https://www.ncbi.nlm...pubmed/23649584

 

What is the effect of daily rinses/brushing with 3% H202 on the dental pulp? We don't know. 

Here 20% was used and aptosis of the dental pulp was noted. Again, indeed this is a much higher percentage. But we don't have studies in which the 3% H202 was used. Plus you would want to use it daily for a prolonged time (and the H202 was not even used for a prolonged time here):

Unfortunately, as said: the studies you'd like to see don't seem to exist. But there may at least be reason to at least look a bit further into this before recommending everyone to use 3% H202 daily in rinses/toothpaste.

 

And what about the effects on your oral microbiome of using 3%H202 daily? We don't know but the oral microbiome may change dramatically, and not necessarily in the good way you predict. The oral microflora could influence the gut microbiome too (mouth gut axis).

 

Of course 'the bad guys' need to be outnumbered by 'the good guys' as you put it. Brushing will change your oral microbiome but without bringing about such a massive change any too aggressive product could cause. 

 

The study you posted about interdental brushes damaging interdental papillae is worrisome. But all depends too on the kind of interdental brushes you are using: they'd have to fit well and not be too large. Pushing them through would be stupid. Just like it would be stupid to not clean the interdental spaces. 

In this study the authors remark they were unsure if the large interdental spaces are caused by interdental brushing, or vice versa: if the patients already had larger interdental spaces and thus were more inclined to use interdental brushes. The study suggests the causality was not proven in other words: https://www.ncbi.nlm...les/PMC3162192/

The authors also remark: "The results of this study highlight the importance of age, tooth crown ratio (width/height) and radiographic vertical distance as factors that determine the morphology of the anterior papillae. Furthermore this study shows that anatomical differences exist between central and lateral papillae" Oversimplified: if you have triangular teeth you are more likely to have larger interdental papillae. And years of braces can cause larger interdental papillae too. You'd want to clean these spaces!

 


Edited by Moondancer, 16 September 2017 - 06:04 PM.


#12 Moondancer

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Posted 16 September 2017 - 06:13 PM

I'm also not sure why you would even compare sterilizing surgical tools to taking care of your teeth and trying to ensure you have a healthy oral microbiome, as obviously you don't want to kill off all your oral bacteria, 'the good ones and bad ones' as you call them. 



#13 aconita

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Posted 17 September 2017 - 02:52 AM

The dose makes the poison, H2O2 can be strong and even dangerous stuff when concentration is high enough, 3% inevitably much further diluted by saliva, is much less than 10%, 20 seconds, as I recommend to spend brushing, is considerably less than 30 minutes.

 

If dosage wasn't so important the majority of the most effective drugs should just kill us on the spot.

 

In teeth bleaching 20% H2O2 for up to 30 minutes is routinely employed and of all the researches about the safety of this practice I have been trough none showed negatives side effects, the only one being cement or composites having less adhesion power on teeth surface up to a few weeks after bleaching is performed.

 

Rats, as all rodents, have different teeth dynamics than humans therefore outcomes not necessarily correlates and again dosage in the study is at least double than normal bleaching practice.

 

The in vitro study is what is, an academical exercise with no practical implications by itself, not to dismiss in vitro researches but we all know too well that in vitro rarely correlates to in vivo and in vivo in laboratory animals more often than not doesn't correlate to humans.  

 

We produce our own H2O2, it is all natural and have its important role, our body need to and can handle it, again dosage makes the poison.

 

Recommending H2O2 as a toothpaste/mouthwash isn't my initiative, as I said there are plenty of recommendations in that direction, including those from very qualified odontologists, it isn't a novelty and there are no cases of negative reports whatsoever.

 

There is a lack of research about the specific practice for obvious reasons but likely for the very reason nobody feels the need for it since is such an harmless practice.

 

Nevertheless I do appreciate you pointing out this is a public forum and that great care should be taken in providing suggestions which might be not suitable to everybody or intrinsically carrying risks.

 

H2O2 toothpaste/mouthwash is just not mainstream among the public and the professionals for whatever reason but certainly not because isn't effective or anyhow dangerous, there are far more potentially dangerous practices routinely prescribed without a blink by the medical community. 

 

We do know how H2O2 affects microbioma, at least relatively to our microbioma knowledge (which is poor at best), H2O2 in its break down process produces a great amount of oxygen, it is all it is really, anaerobic bacteria don't like that as their name implies, they get killed by it, in the other hand aerobic bacteria love it.

 

We know anaerobic bacteria are mostly the bad guys.

 

We should expect a great reduction of the bad guys leaving unaltered the good guys population if not increased.

 

Apart from our very limited knowledge regarding the complex microbioma interactions practice shows it more or less works as above suggested, H2O2 is used as a very effective antiseptic on wounds since ages and eliminates periodontitis reliably and much safely than any other known intervention without any known side effects.

 

I already pointed out how H2O2 is unlikely to affect the gut microbioma since the very tiny amounts eventually making their way there would be very diluted in the process and possibly turned already in simple H2O.

 

Practice shows no negative or any remarkable influence on gut microbioma.

 

Even if brushing does change the oral microbioma, about which I am skeptical, it will do so indiscriminately, it will not change the balance, just the total number (bad guys and good guys), this doesn't lead to any change, especially in the long run.

 

Actually anaerobic bacteria (the bad guys) tend to hide and lurk in difficult to reach areas where they are less exposed to oxygen too (since they don't like it), brushing will likely brush off more of the good guys than of the bad ones, possibly worsening the condition, I never heard of periodontitis solved by brushing, employing some antibacterial toothpaste maybe but certainly not by just brushing.

 

H2O2 isn't aggressive, it is much milder and selective than prescribed antibiotics or clorexidine.

 

In regard to papilla retraction of course the study I provided is far from exhaustive or definitive but since I doubt much money would ever be invested in that direction I am afraid we have to deal with what we got... and some commonsense.

 

Sticking something in a hole everyday isn't likely to have its size reduced over time, the opposite seems more likely to occur.

 

I am not sure about how bad really would be to have a tiny food residual between teeth, in my view a proper microbiome balance is by far more important, but if one really prefers to get rid of it a very gentle and undersized interdental brush would be safer, just in case.

 

I'm also not sure why you would even compare sterilizing surgical tools to taking care of your teeth

 

 

Just to point out the ineffectiveness of mechanical action in affecting bacterial populations.


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#14 HaplogroupW

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Posted 30 September 2017 - 05:20 AM

Any opinions on the water-flossers?



#15 fntms

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Posted 18 October 2017 - 09:37 PM

I have just been just been through a pretty bad episode of gingivitis caused by plaque and /or an infection. Dentist says I need to go through a deep cleaning procedure with local anesthesia etc...of course I will do it but will also need to be more careful about my gums. I brush my teeth 3x a day, floss, and rinse with xylitol a few times but obviously that is not enough.

I read about ozonated water to rinse the mouth (there is at least one reasonably favorable article on pubmed) and it seems to have helped quite a bit in achieving remission from gingivitis, at least for the time being. It's cheap (30€ for a decent ozone maker/pump) and easy to make. It's not unpleasant at all (contrary to clorhexedine after a few days), apart from the fact that the water needs to be quite cold to better hold the ozone. There is ozonated olive oil which I will try soon (you can't make it yourself with a small ozone machine).
Nigella sativa oil also helped, especially to kill the pain, and it also has some supporting pubmed articles.
The h2o2 paste suggested by Aconita sounds good too, will give it a try if I can find the ingredients.
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#16 shp5

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Posted 20 February 2018 - 06:39 PM


 

Have a professional tooth scaling including below gums' line currettage (this is how a curette looks like: https://www.pricefal....-GR-3-4/348762 ), no, the ultrasound scaler isn't enough for under the gum, the manual curette needs to be employed, it will cost you more because is time consuming but if all the sub gingival calculus isn't accurately removed you'll get nothing out of it, you can easily tell if the job is well done because you'll feel when the curette doesn't catch in anymore on the tooth surface (below the gums).

 

did you try both methods? pubmed says both methods are equivalent, but I too have my doubts.


Edited by shp5, 20 February 2018 - 06:40 PM.


#17 james freele

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Posted 01 March 2018 - 12:22 AM

From my experience I used to be losing some of my gums mass in my mouth until I started using zinc chloride in about 65 to 70% water-based solution one drop on non-fluoride toothpaste and scrubbing the gums this will produce bleeding and also bring out Epstein-Barr. In my opinion, getting blood circulation to spot that has been very much low potential cells for a long time, bleeding is a good thing. The active ingredient in black salve is zinc chloride. Harry Hoxies topical solution I believe contained 20% zinc chloride. The AMA admitted it removed topical cancers. But if this was out to the public than $9 trillion dollar business globally would be hurt not to mention the bankers IRS we have been off the gold standards for a long time. Sorry I had to include that since they sent me almost a $10,000 bill yesterday that I have to dispute.  There is a reason why they call it the zinc spark when an egg gets fertilized. They do not call it aluminum or Mercury or any of its derivatives such as fluoride spark. This would give off a different spectrum of light for the replication process of the DNA. Yes I am saying my beliefs are three-dimensional lithography when the zinc spark happens, noticeable flash of light under a microscope. Personally I have been using zinc butter for six years topically it soaks in like DMSO and Burns as it kills low potential cells cells that are more plant-based oils on the outside rather than human cells. In the paper industry they use zinc chloride to breakdown plant oils. This can be very dangerous if left on this skin too long evening if it does not burn. There is less nerve endings deep. Inside as I have personally found out from my intestines that were stuck together and produced similar effects as a ruptured appendix. I was sick for two months liquid in the lungs. But 37 years ago I used to double over with pain and then have to go to the bathroom. Never diagnosed but have common sense. That's why I have no beliefs in the medical field as our saviors. They are useless your body knows there's something wrong way before any tests will show it. Most all diseases if tested will show low zinc. If you get a blood test for zinc levels it only shows what you haven't been having in the last few days. Not any zinc levels in specific areas of the body. I believe this is an understatement https://www.ncbi.nlm...ubmed/20155630 this is also good information http://forums.phoeni...hloride.48647/   personally because I've been using it so long that i use 1 g to 100 mL. From my experience I have found this to be very true  https://en.wikipedia...fection_theory      it is a very old theory. There is another source of information that the only thing I would disagree with is electronic devices do not restore zinc homeostasis. http://www.meditopia...to_512Kbps.wmv    http://www.meditopia...en_512Kbps.wmv    before I started using zinc butter I had the red crystals that rife talks about that he was growing in K media and also found in breast cancer back in the 30s he proved it was pleomorphic. Rife and another Dr. collaborated because his strain was getting contaminated and would lose the red crystals you can see under a regular microscope. This Dr. was feeding it asparagus broth (giving it the Gerson Therapy) and changing it. The FCC private company that controls the radio waves was put in place to control the a.m. radio waves that rife use. Not the other wrong frequencies that work off of harmonics that lose their power every harmonics scale you go up. Strictly talking about the Rife machines out there on the market that can legally operate.



#18 gamesguru

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Posted 19 March 2018 - 03:45 AM

the Atomy toothbrush is often sold at Asian marts, you know the kind that stuffs 100 tilapia and king crab into a single fisbowl.  with a bristle thickness of 0.18mm it's pretty soft

 

 

as for general oral health, i would start with an essential oil rinse.  it's fine to add baking soda or peroxide, but essential oils are the active ingredient (cinnamon, peppermint, lemon, and rosemary)[1], [2].  the phenolic diterpenoids are highly dissociative of the bacterium's periplasm, like carbonic acid and the hermit crab.

 

other things you can try.. yogurt helps maintain the good bacteria, while stuff like green tea and spicy food might help keep the bad bacteria at bay


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#19 baccheion

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Posted 14 April 2018 - 06:16 AM

Do you have any nutrient imbalances/deficiencies?

I'd recommend Life Extension D + K, AOR Ortho-Core, and Doctor's Best Real Krill Enhanced. If too expensive, I suppose there's Life Extension Two-per-day, Life Extension D + K, Nature's Way Mega-DHA, and magnesium (oil spray as a deodorant).

Uncle Harry's Natural Toothpaste, as it's free of teeth-coating glycerine, increases the likelihood of remineralization (by vitamin K2 MK-4 in saliva).

And for no reason: NWC MSM lotion (face, scalp if hairless, and body).

Edited by baccheion, 14 April 2018 - 06:41 AM.


#20 james freele

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Posted 20 April 2018 - 01:05 AM

gamesguhim from what I have found toothbrushes and oils will only delay the inevitable 10 to 15 years down the road removing the teeth. I have two implants front uppers put in almost 20 years ago because of persistent infection when using the fluid I was talking about on each side infection came out one side one of the sides on the right removed enough infection that a pimple came out on the right side of the nose at the base. Autophagy could not keep up. The other infection that I am removing that I had many amalgams at in the back lower jaw wisdom teeth that were removed at17,  36 years ago on the right side is down to the jaw bone. When I work on that area of the mouth the gum will puff up and a small ulcer will form and because it is not just that infection I will get a sore throat. Easily stopped if I stop using zinc chloride solution. My belief on the sore throat is the polio vaccine if you can remember back far enough and apply to a certain percentage of the people that is when I had sore throats. As a kid I did not eat too good, to much sugar. They divided it up into three different strains of polio picking the slowest one that affects the mucous membranes and nerves. Epstein bar virus the medical field ignores it because there is nothing they can do about it even if they notice it. Statistically speaking 95% of Americans have it. The other 5% have eaten better when thay whar young and had genes passed down to fight it off better. This creates a lot of repetition and uses up the zinc. Baccheion the primary deficiency I have and most people in very specific areas is zinc. If it were other elements that would be because the HCl in the stomach is not producing enough to digest your food I have straightened this out seven years ago with aka MMS2 (Calcium Hypochlorite) but I do take 2000 mg of vitamin C for the HCl and B12. Since this does affect the B12 production. Getting a little more off topic my wife had a sore throat while I was breaking up this infection which is connected to this at the time a culture may have confirmed this but not done  I told her to put this solution externally and wash it off after 2 min.the young never listen, two hours after putting it on and it burned her some she put on more 12 hours later she takes a shower talk about the hormones going she is already a ball buster. Because she puts the cover down at night on the toilet. Ouch that hurts. She always had thyroid, goiter problems so one side of her thyroid lit up like a red Christmas tree. When someone has extreme hormones going on the best way to explain it to you is  http://www.worf.org/  love poetry! I personally experienced the same thing when I used this on my thyroid but washed it off after a short time. When I am removing infection lower right side jawbone my right elbow will start aching. 99% of the people will think this is way too extreme but for longevity it works reversing a disease at minimal 30 years in six years trying to eat properly this would take roughly 70 years. This is definitely not a cure like you would do to a amalgam  hardening it in place and have it slowly leak out it does not put it in remission. The extremely strong solution that I use has been for bone infection so you may want to start off if you are thinking of this with a weaker solution. I am not too happy that on my other post the URLs have gotten changed the important one is Greg Caton website meditopia .org if you go in there download his two videos one in light blue and one in pink. The other one was on Phoenix rising just do a search for zinc chloride. If I was not drinking a lot of coffee in the last year about 80 pounds of Kerrygold butter and vitamin C. I would be doing MMS1 which is something that works. by the way it is very easy to make zinc chloride but it is extremely strong some of the isotopes have a half-life that is a little longer which may be the reason why it is stronger. HCl well ventilated area and put some zinc in in a few days the bubbling stops and it should be a pH of four.


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#21 gamesguru

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Posted 09 May 2018 - 05:10 PM

Do you have any nutrient imbalances/deficiencies?

I'd recommend Life Extension D + K, AOR Ortho-Core, and Doctor's Best Real Krill Enhanced. If too expensive, I suppose there's Life Extension Two-per-day, Life Extension D + K, Nature's Way Mega-DHA, and magnesium (oil spray as a deodorant).

Uncle Harry's Natural Toothpaste, as it's free of teeth-coating glycerine, increases the likelihood of remineralization (by vitamin K2 MK-4 in saliva).

And for no reason: NWC MSM lotion (face, scalp if hairless, and body).

 

A lot of things are important for bone health, magnesium and vitamin D included.

 

And while the quip about glycerin is certainly deserving of further thought, it's totally unrelated to the topic of the thread :sleep: Perhaps coating the teeth is good depending on the situation, you plan on acidic foods, or 36 hours with no toothbrush, but a few days a week (or something) you can go glycerin-free?
 



#22 jack black

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Posted 19 June 2018 - 03:25 PM

Any opinions on the water-flossers?

 

by far the best solution. stopped receding gums for me. i gave them as gifts to family members with similar problems and sadly no one uses them regularly. a real shame.
 






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