• Log in with Facebook Log in with Twitter Log In with Google      Sign In    
  • Create Account
  LongeCity
              Advocacy & Research for Unlimited Lifespans

Photo
- - - - -

Help "selling" stubborn parents on resveratrol

resveratrol elderly aging distrust eductaion

  • Please log in to reply
11 replies to this topic

#1 chrono

  • Member, Moderator
  • 2,444 posts
  • 796
  • Location:New England

Posted 22 January 2018 - 06:57 AM


In very brief, I need help convincing my parents to take resveratrol....in fact, to take anything. My mother is 63 and my father 71, and they are the most intransigent people I have ever met. Once they get an idea in their head

 

As an example:, recently, my mother considered trying CBD to help treat her life-long crippling insomnia. She did not, because "diarrhea" was listed as the last possible side effect on the label. She's smoked marijuana before, and the idea that a byproduct of it will give her GI problems should be absolutely ludicrous, and even if so, treatable and bearable enough to solve help her get more than 4 hours of sleep before she works 12. But no; she had this idea that is will give her diarrhea, and so she refuses to even try the smallest amount. She smoked throughout her youth and this idea should be absolutely absurd to her.

 

Another good one: she broke her ankle falling on the ice last year, went to physical therapy the amount required but still leaving her in pain, but decided she didn't need to go any more for no reason she could articulate. When I encouraged her to go until she was free of pain, she literally yelled at me.

 

I'd say the real problem is her doctor; she goes to a lazy, run-of-the-mill salaried doctor, and despite being 64 and probably weighing 250lbs, her doctor sends her away saying she has nothing to worry about, every time. My father has not seen a doctor in 5 years and is such a sensitive subject my mom can't bring herself to even ask him. I read forums like this and can think of dozens of things she and my father could be doing to extend their life, from fish oil to D3 to TEMPOL to cerebrolysin......to resverotrol. She has actually heard of this, but knows nothing about it. I received the RevGenetics 1/2 off offer in the mail recently, and thought how wonderful it would be if I could get my parents to order it. But we're not exactly rich, and $152 is nothing to sneeze at for people who treat their old age with such a cavalier and uncaring attitude.

 

What I want to know/what help with, is how I might get my mother to purchase this excellent 1/2 off deal of resveratrol. She isn't stupid (in fact teaches a master's class in children's literacy)....but once she gets ANY negative reason in her mind, there is no changing it. Does anyone have any resources they could suggest such that I could send her, she could read and understand with limited medical knowledge, and might entice her to become interested in what this supplement could mean for her in her old age. Sadly I have to stay out of it, since me suggesting something means an automatic disqualification more often than not.

 

I love my parents greatly and would like them to be around a while longer, but as things stand they refuse to even look at themselves in the mirror (in terms of health). Any books, web pages, YT Videos, TV specials....anything positive and convincing, would be a godsend, and exactly what I need.



#2 Turnbuckle

  • Member
  • 3,059 posts
  • 1,180
  • Location:USA
  • NO

Posted 22 January 2018 - 11:15 AM

Be careful with resveratrol. It can cause joint pain.


  • Agree x 1

sponsored ad

  • Advert
Click HERE to rent this advertising spot to support LongeCity (this will replace the google ad above).

#3 ceridwen

  • Member
  • 1,213 posts
  • 95

Member Away
  • Location:UK

Posted 22 January 2018 - 01:42 PM

and brain shrinkage. Removes amyloid but does not improve memory
  • Good Point x 1

#4 Turnbuckle

  • Member
  • 3,059 posts
  • 1,180
  • Location:USA
  • NO

Posted 22 January 2018 - 02:39 PM

and brain shrinkage. Removes amyloid but does not improve memory

 

 

A bit disturbing--

 

 

Resveratrol treatment increased brain volume loss. This finding persisted when participants with weight loss (table 2) were excluded (data not shown). The etiology and interpretation of brain volume loss observed here and in other studies are unclear, but they are not associated with cognitive or functional decline. In the first human active Aβ immunization trial, antibody responders had greater brain volume loss, and greater volumetric changes were associated with higher antibody titers.36 In the phase 2 bapineuzumab trial, treatment resulted in greater ventricular enlargement, but only in APOE4 carriers.37 In the phase 3 bapineuzumab APOE4 carrier trial and the high-dose noncarrier study, treatment resulted in a trend toward greater brain atrophy.38 Since this phase 2 study lacks consistent changes in clinical outcomes, interpretation of the effects on trajectories for plasma and CSF Aβ40, and brain and ventricular volume, remain uncertain.
 

 

 



#5 chrono

  • Topic Starter
  • Member, Moderator
  • 2,444 posts
  • 796
  • Location:New England

Posted 23 January 2018 - 08:14 PM

and brain shrinkage. Removes amyloid but does not improve memory

 

Well, that means it's good for avoiding/slowing Alzheimer's but bad for joining MENSA. Good to know

 

 

 

 

A bit disturbing--

 

The etiology and interpretation of brain volume loss observed here and in other studies are unclear, but they are not associated with cognitive or functional decline

 

 

 

Most of us talking about geriatrics are more concerned with amyloid plaques killing you than brain shrinking that has no apparent effect on cognition or mortality. It's an interesting effect to note, and should be studied, but for people over 70, it's the kind of factoid that might prevent them from taking something that could extend their lives for years because of a side effect that simply sounds scary.

 

And sorry to be "that guy," but as a moderator, how is this relevant to finding scientific material that would give my parents a good a balanced view of a medication that could be extremely valuable to their health?

 

EDIT: Thanks for the heads up on the joint pain, my mother does have some arthritis in her ankle, I'll look at that carefully before going further :)


Edited by chrono, 23 January 2018 - 08:24 PM.


#6 Supierce

  • Guest
  • 91 posts
  • 25
  • Location:Vermont

Posted 24 January 2018 - 12:05 AM

Chrono, with aging parents I'm in the same situation. Here's where I turn:

 

https://scholar.goog...=en&as_sdt=0,46

 

There's quite a lot of information if you use the sort options.


Edited by Supierce, 24 January 2018 - 12:10 AM.

  • like x 1

#7 chrono

  • Topic Starter
  • Member, Moderator
  • 2,444 posts
  • 796
  • Location:New England

Posted 24 January 2018 - 04:11 AM

Chrono, with aging parents I'm in the same situation. Here's where I turn:

 

https://scholar.goog...=en&as_sdt=0,46

 

There's quite a lot of information if you use the sort options.

 

UGH! You're definitely a girl after my own heart. My first instinct is to use the medical subject headings on pubmed, and then to look for more fuzzy searches on google scholar.

 

But my mom...it would just be greek to her. She's more of a "Prevention Magazine" kind of person. That's a bit of an exaggeration, but she needs to be told in simple terms why something works, what if any side effects exist and hopefully that they are very mild (or she won't use it). She has no idea about senescence or neurons or telomeres or any of the underpinnings of the knowledge here, and if I try to explain it she'll just shut me out. 

 

I was really hoping that there would be a medical review, a website, even a tacky google lecture talking about how cool and revolutionary this stuff is. Right now I'm trying desperately to buy a car, so I can't spend all day on the internet looking for such a thing, but I mean, it must exist, right? Maybe a peer journal review might actually be the best option, if only because I can't think of anything else she would find trustworthy. I'll try to look in the next couple days.

 

Thanks for those who've responded, and I'll keep checking back, and if I get a car before the sale ends I'll just print out a ton of med reports and cut out excerpts into OneNote for her. >_>


Edited by chrono, 24 January 2018 - 04:14 AM.


#8 Turnbuckle

  • Member
  • 3,059 posts
  • 1,180
  • Location:USA
  • NO

Posted 24 January 2018 - 10:43 AM

Ask yourself how you were sold on it. Tell them about the great results that you yourself experienced by taking it.



#9 ceridwen

  • Member
  • 1,213 posts
  • 95

Member Away
  • Location:UK

Posted 24 January 2018 - 01:20 PM

I got the info from science daily not recently either. Sorry no reference but I expect it's still there

#10 ceridwen

  • Member
  • 1,213 posts
  • 95

Member Away
  • Location:UK

Posted 24 January 2018 - 01:23 PM

The problem is that the test I mentioned with resveratrol did NOT improve cognition.

#11 Oakman

  • Member
  • 531 posts
  • 272
  • Location:CO

Posted 24 January 2018 - 05:42 PM

The root of your problem (IMHO) is the fact that people generally, parents included (as they are 'just like' people too), only do things that make sense to them. Having anyone, including your kids, tell you "the answer" to their problems... is to do this or that, take this or that....is not going to convince them.  Moreover, if they are not of a scientific bent (and apparently yours are not) then trying to provide info (studies, reports, etc.) is going to do more to scare them away than get them over to your way of thinking. Another topic for sure, but truth be told, resveratrol may be a miracle supplement, but it is highly unlikely it will do what you suggest you want it to. That's just the sad fact.

 

Try to put yourselves in their shoes, with their mindset, with you as their kid. In their eyes, they are older, have more experience, and have been fooled before and so are wiser and more resistant to hype than you. What would you be thinking being in their shoes?

 

When I was young, I too tried to 'fix' my parents so they would live long and healthy lives, cure their illnesses, and (perhaps most important) so I wouldn't have to worry. They would have very little of what I prescribed for them, whether supplement or advice. Very frustrating, yes. Nevertheless, they did live long and fairly healthy, despite my best efforts. And once I gave up on them, MY life became much less stressful, because after all, I was no longer responsible for their declining health. Quite a relief!



sponsored ad

  • Advert
Click HERE to rent this advertising spot to support LongeCity (this will replace the google ad above).

#12 OldBoxingGuy

  • Member
  • 23 posts
  • 5
  • Location:Canada

Posted 24 January 2018 - 05:43 PM

NM


Edited by OldBoxingGuy, 24 January 2018 - 05:46 PM.






Also tagged with one or more of these keywords: resveratrol, elderly, aging, distrust, eductaion

1 user(s) are reading this topic

0 members, 1 guests, 0 anonymous users