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Whole body Vibration Machines


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19 replies to this topic

#1 edward

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Posted 19 December 2008 - 01:14 AM


Anyone tried these. They say 500-700 calories burned per hour. The research shows results similar to strength training plus a bunch of other benefits one doesnt get from conventional exercise.


Research studies (you will have to google each one as this page doesn't have direct links)
http://www.elitespor..._erevnes.shtml#

Overview
http://en.wikipedia...._body_vibration

product examples
http://www.usfitness...CFQZinAodHilb7w

#2 icyT

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Posted 17 January 2009 - 05:03 AM

I tried it out once on some platform in a gym equipment store. It felt sort of cool. Like inversion, I'd try it out for novelty and if it does anything special, but I wouldn't hold my hopes out for it either. Shaking things up is great but you still need the right ingrediants or you'll taste bad.

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#3 kismet

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Posted 18 January 2009 - 01:31 AM

The research shows results similar to strength training plus a bunch of other benefits one doesnt get from conventional exercise.

Not really. It may show benefits you don't get from conventional exercise, but it is in no way superior or similar to strength training. Do you even know what strength is if you more than remotely try to support such a claim? (yes I believe "similar" is way too strong a word to describe this method) How can you develop the neuromuscular ability to support heavy loads, erm, without loading? This is a logical fallacy and breaches the most basic rule in sport science "specifity".

As per the wiki article you linked, it does not offer any performance benefits for trained athletes:
"specific Whole Body Vibration protocol of 5 weeks had no surplus value upon the conventional training program to improve speed-strength performance in sprint-trained athletes."

But strength training unsurprsingly works even in the trained population...

Yes, it may have value for the lazy immortalist, but I'm an athletic immortalist so I can't comment on that one.  :~

#4 niner

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Posted 18 January 2009 - 01:35 AM

Some of us prefer to be shaken, not stirred.

#5 TheLorax

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Posted 26 January 2009 - 07:13 AM

Ergo-Log.com recently summarized a study that seems to conclude vibration "training" as just about worthless:
http://www.ergo-log.com/vibplate2.html

#6 kismet

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Posted 09 February 2009 - 02:37 PM

Ergo-Log.com recently summarized a study that seems to conclude vibration "training" as just about worthless:
http://www.ergo-log.com/vibplate2.html

Oh my gawd! A blog on scientific doping (& ergogenic aids). At a first glance the blog you posted looks great. Thanks.

#7 Medvibe

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Posted 27 February 2009 - 05:26 PM

IT WORKS AND ILL PROVE IT!. I own a company dedicated to furthering the research and development of wholebody vibration. We currently supply Cal State University Fullerton Kinesiology Lab, Arizona States Health and Wellness Campus, and University of Arizona Physiology with our line of Pivotal vibration platforms. Arizona state concluded a study on our products last year that will soon be published in the journal of sports medicine. The study states that 5 minutes of holding a standing position , an athletic position( kness slightly bent) and a squat position at (25 Hz setting on the machine) was roughly muscularly equivalent to 5 minutes of a near sprint on a stationary bike. Okay so you may not think that that sounds like much but get on a bike and try sprinting for 5 minutes, your muscles would be on fire and you would be completely winded right? Well that is gonna scare 90% of people away from excercise becasue they fear that burn. With obesity rates on the rise, we provide a simple solution that can get them similar muscular results with very little effort. Go to Http://www.google.com and see the technology page and the research page. You can watch an active diagram of how the vibration plates work. Additionaly, we have about 25 studies posted on the research page.

LAST BUT NOT LEAST! Many comapnies are advertising the product as something you just stand on. THIS IS FALSE-- For the elderly who can't do the traditional work out, this may suffice and add some forced muscle articulation, bone density and tone in their lower extremeties but for fitness buff the workout is much more intense. A vibration training workout consists of 10 minutes non stop of alternating static and active poses such as squats, pushups, body bridges, dips, standing, standings abs, shoulder presses, and bicep curls. I can do over 100 pushups but only about 10 on the platform. I can do set of 10 tricep extension excercises in the gym but I can barely do 10 dips on the platform supporting about 1/3 of my body weight. You get the point. One of my machines is at Tripple Threat Performance down in Tempe, Arizona where many Pro-Athletes train. There has to be a reason why thier strength an conditioning coaches who have years of specialized training incorporate my machines into their exercise regimines.

If you have any more questions, ask away and ill be happy to answer.

Edited by Brainbox, 28 February 2009 - 09:56 PM.
Spam removal from an otherwise informative contribution.


#8 Prometheus

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Posted 27 February 2009 - 10:49 PM

What we do know is that when we put mesenchymal stem cells in culture and expose them to vibration during the culture conditions, they follow a chondrocytic lineage (turn to ligament). Also, it makes sense that athletes who engage in activities such as running and are thus already exposed to vibration will have minimal benefit whilst strength athletes who dont run would find some benefit. Personally Ive never tried but am intrigued. Medvibe, do you have a contact/rep in Melbourne, Australia?

#9 icyT

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Posted 06 March 2009 - 03:30 AM

I won't say it's equal but part of strength training is learning to stabilize a proper posture to optimally a load with your bone alignment and keep from falling over. That's much of vibration, stabilization.

#10 StrangeAeons

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Posted 06 March 2009 - 03:48 AM

I can't believe nobody's said this yet, but have you noticed a disproportionate number of women interested in this technology :) ?

#11 icyT

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Posted 06 March 2009 - 03:53 AM

No more than I notice a disproportionate amount interested in other lazy machines that you see on infomercials. I see what you're doin' there though :) I think you'll have more fun with the machine that simulates horseback riding. Anyway one big reason, besides the lack of effort, is people selling these imply it breaks up cellulite, which I haven't seen any evidence for, but you know how women hate cellulite. Men have it too though... but are attracted to more badass strength machines maybe?

Edited by Tyciol, 06 March 2009 - 03:54 AM.


#12 Luna

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Posted 06 March 2009 - 05:44 PM

As if we had a magical device that would take the fat away! :X
And if we had, it's not cheap boo ;-;

#13 stayin_alive

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Posted 27 March 2009 - 01:39 PM

I wonder what effect these would have on a really big 300+ lbs, BBW.
My sister, after having two kids, ballooned up in just a few years. Personally, I think it's due to the pharm agents she's under - she is either sleeping or eating those are her only modes, but nevertheless. She simply for whatever reason, never sticks to any plan of even the slightest exercise, such as walking for 5 mins a day.

It's easy to laugh at these people and claim "it's their own fault." And I can't say it's not her fault. But when this happens to someone you love and someone you grew up with, well, if a shaking chair would benefit her, I'd get it for her.

#14 prophets

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Posted 27 March 2009 - 02:51 PM

whole body vibration is not good for morbidly obese or even overweight people.

it's really better for those with osteoporosis. the whole concept of vibration was created by NASA to help prevent bone deterioration by astronauts in space. it is meant to improve bone health with the same sort of physiological response that exists in running or jumping, when your bones experience a low intensity vibration. it signals to the bones, "let's grow".

the problem w/ whole body vibration is raynaud's syndrome, a condition that occurs in people who do work like holding down a jackhammer on a construction site. the nerves in the body become so screwed up that they constantly inhibit blood to the body parts (typically in the extremities).

i did whole body vibration for a few weeks and then felt this raynaud's syndrome begin to occur in a mild way. i immediately stopped.

in my opinion, whole body vibration is a lazy way to deal a health problem (typically bone related). if you have osteo, the real way to fix it is to simply go out and jog at 60%+ VO2 max and really get a whole impact on your body.

otherwise go take AMG-162, osteocal, etc.

Edited by prophets, 27 March 2009 - 02:55 PM.


#15 Medvibe

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Posted 07 October 2009 - 01:38 AM

whole body vibration is not good for morbidly obese or even overweight people.

it's really better for those with osteoporosis. the whole concept of vibration was created by NASA to help prevent bone deterioration by astronauts in space. it is meant to improve bone health with the same sort of physiological response that exists in running or jumping, when your bones experience a low intensity vibration. it signals to the bones, "let's grow".

the problem w/ whole body vibration is raynaud's syndrome, a condition that occurs in people who do work like holding down a jackhammer on a construction site. the nerves in the body become so screwed up that they constantly inhibit blood to the body parts (typically in the extremities).

i did whole body vibration for a few weeks and then felt this raynaud's syndrome begin to occur in a mild way. i immediately stopped.

in my opinion, whole body vibration is a lazy way to deal a health problem (typically bone related). if you have osteo, the real way to fix it is to simply go out and jog at 60%+ VO2 max and really get a whole impact on your body.

otherwise go take AMG-162, osteocal, etc.


Prophets yes and no on your arguments. WBV for exercised is considered a dosed vibration. There is a reason we tell people to limit exercise to 10 minutes 3 times a week. The WBV you are talking about refers to ISO 2631 which deals with industrial vibration. Your jackhammer argument would only be effective if the operators used that machine 3 times a week for ten minutes per session. Realistically though contstruction workers are using those things for hours a day. It sort of makes sense that overexposure to that kind of movement would cause injury. In regards to osteo-- The majority of people affected by osteopenia and soteporosis are over over the age of 50-- 75% of which are women. 1. Most women see it pop up at around 60- 65 years of age-- do you think they can handle 60% VO2 run especially when most have undergone knee or hip surgeries? Probably not. 2. Some of our customers in thier eighties have experienced side effects with many of the osteo drugs. One of our clients stopped taking fosimax and used our platform instead. His recent DXA scan revealed no further bone loss. Although it didn't show drastic growth, it stopped the loss and kept him off drugs with painful side affects. Im not saying WBV is the miracle platform that will change the world-- Im just saying it has its applications across the board from children to the elderly.

#16 ajnast4r

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Posted 12 October 2009 - 05:41 PM

dont nobody wanna lift no heavy ass weight! -ronnie



#17 william7

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Posted 17 May 2013 - 08:21 PM

A lot of videos on You Tube advocating whole body vibration. In the video below, it's mentioned that acceleration training is validated through peer reviewed published research.



#18 Raptor87

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Posted 22 May 2013 - 04:23 PM

That can't be good for the blood vessels and capillaries.

http://www.humanilln...-s-Disease.html

#19 mrd1

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Posted 09 September 2013 - 09:58 PM

http://www.ergo-log.com/vibplate2.html

I second this link I think as far as perserving muscle tissue that this is pretty pointless.

And, it is not unreasonable to assume it may be ineffective for burning fat and at the very least more effective choices currently exist with a much larger and agreed on basis.

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#20 robosapiens

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Posted 25 September 2013 - 04:50 PM

And it's not proven to be completely safe, as it could theoretically cause damage to kidneys or heart valves
not enough peer reviewed safety studies have been performed, as this is technically a medical device.

http://www.osteopeni...ine-danger.html




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