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Global Integrative Multilevel Multisystem Aging Cure Plan


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#1 immorta

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Posted 21 February 2009 - 09:57 PM


Hi !

We're on the way to establish Globaly Coordinated Integrative Multilevel Multisystem Aging Cure Plan.
And we need your help to connect this project to the world's best minds in the field !

Please take a look on our recent work (in attachments) and send us immorta@bk.ru available contacts
of involved researchers and volunteers (Is that You ?).

Let's cure aging within our personal lifespan !

Thank you !

Attached Files


Edited by immorta, 21 February 2009 - 10:07 PM.

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#2 brokenportal

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Posted 21 February 2009 - 10:28 PM

I skimmed this, and from what I can see this looks tremendously great. Im going to go over these attachments in detail.

You will find no shortage of people around here to help you gain exposure for this.

We are also looking to start a science section that is for the top researchers in the field, and people by invite and application only. If you want to get in on that then let me know and stay tuned. If it all works out it will be just the kind of hot spot for collecting the aging researchers minds and ideas and discussion that you seem to be looking for also.
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#3 immorta

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Posted 21 February 2009 - 10:54 PM

We are also looking to start a science section that is for the top researchers in the field, and people by invite and application only. If you want to get in on that then let me know and stay tuned. If it all works out it will be just the kind of hot spot for collecting the aging researchers minds and ideas and discussion that you seem to be looking for also.


Thanks ! I would like to get in !

How can i found people for consulting me on particular question of this plan ?

May be we can do it as a aging researchers and volunteers interest and skill database or smth?

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#4 Shannon Vyff

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Posted 22 February 2009 - 04:05 AM

Thank you for your activism immorta! Great to see :-D

#5 immorta

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Posted 28 February 2009 - 10:20 PM

Thank you for your activism immorta! Great to see :)


Thanks in advance for your help !

We'r working hard to make real unprecedented aging conquest review. As you can see in attached PDFs
http://www.imminst.o...t...ost&id=5576
http://www.imminst.o...t...ost&id=5575
we need to know many involved aspects.

We ask you to contribute on particular aspect : main senscence research and therapies leaders in the past and today.

We are looking at several sources for info, including the
"Mechants of Immortality" book, Reason's blog archives and a few others.

I want to ask you for additional links/references where I can find the
needed info and I also want to pose this question to you directly: Who are
the champions in fight against aging.

The definition is a person who leads others, who uses his own resources
(and finds more) for the fight against aging. If you drop a fight against
aging champion in the middle of a desert, he would find resources to keep
up the fight, find others and persuade them to join the project.

The definition includes people who are
- lead others (first and foremost)
- personally motivated
- active in the field (work part-time or full-time on curing aging)
- openly (or semi-openly) support the goal to cure aging
- do any of the following: organize projects, promote the idea,
fund/sponsor projects, lobby

It doesn't include scientisits who just work on their research.
It doesn't include volunteers and activists who do not play a leading role.

Today we already found many excelent examples :

Michael West
Michael Rose
Cynthia Kenyon
Bruce Ames
Richard Miller
Stuart Jay Olshansky
Aubrey de Grey
David Gebel

From Russia:
Lev Komarov (died)
Bogomoletz (died)
Krutjko
Batin

This is a full list we got today. But we suppose we can miss fiew of them and we would like to now important aging research project coordinators, their current status, goals, projects, teams, progress.

We'r also interested in number of other questions. You can see them in our program's documents and we'll describe them later.

I hope that such large structure like ImmInst can easily identify them. Who can help us in these particular qustions ?

Edited by immorta, 28 February 2009 - 10:25 PM.


#6 Prometheus

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Posted 01 March 2009 - 12:29 AM

A fantastic effort. Can you tell us who is behind this organization? Love the way you have laid everything out (in scope and detail). Very interested!

#7 caston

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Posted 01 March 2009 - 03:55 AM

i'm on my n95 so i'll keep this short. I'd like to reccomend teaming up with diabetes research groups to find and test AGE breakers

#8 immorta

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Posted 01 March 2009 - 10:23 PM

Hello !
its a scienceagainstaging.com foundation and Mikhail BATIN.

A fantastic effort. Can you tell us who is behind this organization? Love the way you have laid everything out (in scope and detail). Very interested!


Well, we'll try to make this picture more scientific, using special software for knowlege representation.

#9 treonsverdery

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Posted 02 March 2009 - 03:11 AM

I strongly support peer reviewed studies

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#10 icyT

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Posted 02 March 2009 - 06:28 AM

I am probably stereotyping in my imagination, but I just picture the Russians taking a strong interest in this. Maybe I am just brainwashed and imagining them all taking exercise breaks instead of coffee breaks and juggling kettlebells? I picture the harsh winter convinces them of the power of youth.

#11 Mind

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Posted 05 March 2009 - 08:28 PM

How about Leonid Gavrilov? A leader in anti-aging efforts.

#12 Prometheus

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Posted 05 March 2009 - 10:52 PM

Well, we'll try to make this picture more scientific, using special software for knowlege representation.

Yes, the illustrations are excellent - best in class even by professional publishing standards. What software do you use?

#13 immorta

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Posted 08 March 2009 - 07:47 PM

Thanks !
We're already in contact with him

How about Leonid Gavrilov? A leader in anti-aging efforts.



#14 brokenportal

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Posted 12 March 2009 - 04:46 PM

Well gees, if those are the only leading researchers in the field then we need to light an even bigger fire under our asses even faster. That should be the list of the leading researchers in just one town, not the world.

#15 immorta

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Posted 13 March 2009 - 12:02 AM

Well gees, if those are the only leading researchers in the field then we need to light an even bigger fire under our asses even faster. That should be the list of the leading researchers in just one town, not the world.


Can you add here some of these leaders ?

#16 Michael

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Posted 18 March 2009 - 12:57 AM

Immorta, I want to congratulate you and your partners for putting this together: it's a remarkably wide-ranging layout of things that contribute to aging and age-related diseases, or that might illuminate our understanding of either or their relationship.

However, while I'm really quite impressed with it as a compilation, I think that as a plan to cure aging, it's actually too comprehensive. In fact, in one sense (and I feel a bit silly in saying this), it's actually too ambitious a proposal.

What you've laid out here is a proposal to tackle almost every area of science relating to aging and age-related disease -- which, ultimately, amounts to almost everything in biomedical research today -- public and private, basic to translational to clinical, epidemiological and interventional -- plus much public health research. If the path toward a cure for aging necessarily involves a major ramping-up of this entire scope of research, what we're ultimately saying is that we have to gather the political will, market pressure, and financial and intellectual resources to essentially multiply the combined efforts of all of the world's biomedical research by some multiple.

And, much of this is focused on what Aubrey terms the "gerontological" school of anti-aging biomedicine: the identification and teasing-apart of the metabolic origins of the cellular and molecular damage that underlies aging, following which we would then modulate those pathways in youth to make them less damaging, so that the rate of damage generation is reduced, lowering the rate of its accumulation and ultimately leading to slower aging. As Aubrey has emphasized, this suffers from several pretty serious limitations. For one thing, it will take a very long time to develop treatments, because at present, our understanding of these pathways -- which are only described in the most general terms in your impressive document, which is none the less already a visibly elaborate and highly complex network -- is "woefully incomplete," and is likely to remain so for a very, very long time. For another, precisely because metabolism is so incredibly complexly interrelated, tinkering with one aspect inevitably ripples in unexpected ways through the entire system; thus, such perturbations of the body's normal metabolic regulatory systems pose an inherent risk of unanticipated consequences: our bodies are designed to operate as finely-balanced homeostatic systems, and interfering with the basic pathways underlying our normal functionality (especially in our current state of relative ignorance) inevitably causes undesired side-effects. And third, such an approach, since it can only slow the rate of accumulation of aging damage, can only be of very modest benefit to those whose bodies have already suffered significant amounts of aging damage, while the benefits and long-term risks of treatment will take many decades to become clear in the young.

A core advantage of the SENS platform for biomedical gerontology is that it is based on an "engineering" heuristic to the development of age-reversing biotechnologiges. The "engineering" approach, opts to bypass the complexity and gulf of ignorance surrounding the metabolic basis of aging, by tackling aging damage directly, as a therapeutic target in and of itself. By removing, repairing, replacing, or rendering harmless the inert cellular and molecular damage whose accumulation underlies the slide into frailty that is aging, we can regenerate a structurally old body into a structurally young one -- and the metabolic derangements that flow from impairments of those structures can normalize.

This offers several advantages over the 'gerontological' approach, including reduced risk of side-effects (as it minimizes interference with essential metabolic processes) and the ability to benefit persons who have already undergone substantial aging (because it will actually reverse the structural decay of aging rather than merely retard it).

In addition, while still ambitious and requiring the launching of a substantial leap forward in research, the fact that the SENS platform requires only the targeting of a limited range of well-characterized therapeutic targets, using only existing or foreseeable biotechnology, ironically makes it both dramatically less expensive, and its fruits considerably nearer-term, than one based on deciphering so massive a range of biological knowledge and unguessed-at therapies embraced in the "Science for Life" documents. This kind of ramp-up is ambitious, but achievable, and in time for many of us now living; I fear that attempting to move beyond the relatively narrow range of research necessary to achieve the first iteration of the SENS platform and thus initiate "longevity escape velocity" into the much broader agenda of the SfL proposals would trade a carefully-targeted set of clear and concrete proposals into an everything-and-nothing cry for 'more research!' on everything, diffusing political will, draining and diverting resources, and necessitating an extended political and scientific timeframe that would (yes) cost lives.

I admire the power of the authors of these documents to dream big; I ask you all to awake, and focus your eyes on the road at our feet instead of locking your gaze in a beautiful but ultimately hyperopic sweep of far horizons.

Live long -- live young!

-Michael

#17 caston

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Posted 18 March 2009 - 02:12 AM

Before undergoing SENS it would be best to make sure one is free of pathological infections.

Governments of the world may need to change their health systems to deal with aging populations.

Edited by caston, 18 March 2009 - 02:13 AM.


#18 brokenportal

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Posted 19 March 2009 - 06:51 PM

If the path toward a cure for aging necessarily involves a major ramping-up of this entire scope of research, what we're ultimately saying is that we have to gather the political will, market pressure, and financial and intellectual resources to essentially multiply the combined efforts of all of the world's biomedical research by some multiple.



Right, thats what many of us, and hopefully soon the whole world, are working toward.

There are around 7 billion people on the planet. It seems to me that there is plenty of room to find and or educate hundreds of thousands, or more, qualified researchers to work with the quest for indefinity.

This is a war on aging. SENS is a well orchestrated battle camp near or at the head of this offensive, but thats just one battle camp. I mean, the world is at our disposal to help recruit and train to fight the army of the grim reapers minions. There are many more offensive fronts to tackle and cover. We have the man hours, and we have limited time, the scope needs to be broadened.

Metabolism may be a hard route to pursue, but lets dig in. The programming theory "battle camp" still needs to expand, the SENS platform has plenty of room to expand. I mean, there are 7 strategies outlined, lets make 7 columns and continuously add more and more peer reviewed alternate strategies for more camps to pursue. Lets do the same for metabolism and agi and stem cells and nanotechnology and all the rest of the avenues that can help expedite the realization of indefinite healthy life extension.

I cant wait till immorta's plans develop more and sink in around here. This happened to me when I was first introduced to SENS too, I sensed just how poingnant it was, but I wasnt sure how to grasp on and help with it until many months down the road as it all sank in. In what ever ways you need us to collaborate immorta, Im am down with it. Please keep us updated.
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#19 maestro949

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Posted 20 March 2009 - 11:23 AM

I'm impressed. Very thorough and succinct.

I fully support such a comprehensive and methodical approach to curing aging and reject any notion that the biological complexity must be sidestepped in order to engineer rejuvenative therapies. Surely no human could comprehend the quantity and complexity of functional components operating within an organism but this complexity can be modeled in silico and via systems approaches. An investment in developing such systems tools and models will provide us with much more precise and cost effective therapies.

Putting off a systematic attack on aging is a guaranteed death sentence. Make no small plans.

#20 Illuminatusdarksoul

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Posted 23 March 2009 - 05:36 PM

The most obvious lists of people interested in ageing research- this would be IABG and SENS attendees, The Lifeboat Foundation members, MF and MFURI members, people that publish in SAGE KE, Rejuvenation research, members of IAH, Wolfson ageing labs, members of American Aging Association, British Society for Research into Ageing, Help the aged, institutes for regeneration at various universities etc

Ageing researchers:

Aubrey de Grey
Jeff Hall
Jan Vijg
Judith Campisi
Cynthia Kenyon
Joao Pedro de Magalhaes
Leonid Gavrilov and wife
Bob Lightowlers
Ian Holt
Karl Riabowol
Matthew Porteus
Fulvio Mavilio
Tom Kirkwood
Linda Partridge
David Gems
Jay Olshansky
Nadia Rosenthal
Richard Aspinall
David Rubinsztein
Alexandra Stolzing
Sebastian Sethe
Richard Faragher
Fabrizio d'Adda di Fagagna
Rita Effros
Ulf Brunk
Henry Weiner
Gerald Schatten
Irina Conboy
John Allen
Vernon Ingram
Calogero Caruso
Matthew Collins
Gabriele Saretzki
Thomas von Zglinicki
Deborah Dunn-Walters
Megan Sykes
Graham Pawelec
Rochelle Buffenstein
Silvia Gravina
George Church
Matthew Allen
Oliver Tussaint
Daniel Martinez
Danila Medvedev
Michael Rose
Maria Blasco
Manuel Serrano
Bruce Rittmann
David Harrison
John Sedivy
Judith Haendeler
Andrew Porter
Marisol Corral-Debrinski
Edward Masoro
Ana maria Cuervo
Chris Mason
A Bartke
Ruth Itzhaki
Stephen Minger

Students and misc:

Michael Rae
Ben Zealley
Matthias Bollman
Mike Kope
Sarah Marr
John Schloendorn
Mark Hamaleinen
Justin Rebo
Kelsey Moody
Sophie Lukowski
Sven Bulterijs
Johan Sjoberg
Stuart Calimport
Aaron Stupple
Lucas Trindade
Kemal Akman
Danila Medvedev
Tim Webb
Lijang Jiang
Jaques Mathieu
Soren Stirling

#21 omnidoom

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Posted 24 March 2009 - 01:39 AM

Terrific stuff fellas!
Richard Faragher has expressed interest in this venture, so thats another name ticked.
Yep, terrific effort guys, worthy of the task.
Respectfully
Soren

#22 Illuminatusdarksoul

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Posted 24 March 2009 - 02:10 PM

Terrific stuff fellas!
Richard Faragher has expressed interest in this venture, so thats another name ticked.
Yep, terrific effort guys, worthy of the task.
Respectfully
Soren


A global virtual Institute for Rejuvenative Medicine with a strong student research program


For me personally this is what we should do and get everyone to work towards. Here is my reasoning in a Q and A format.


Why not just stick with joining American ageing association and mainstream institutes?
They can't get any funding and aren't doing it quick enough or looking at things from a rejuvenative/regenerative/engineering viewpoint.
Why not stick with MF?
It is too controversial, would never get acceptance of government or researchers-but has MFURI which if had support of more PIs would really get somewhere.
Why global?
Get everyone on board-different legal systemes, goverment spending allocations, specialised research etc
Why virtual?
Physical costs of setting up institute ignored. Base institute in Universities around the world. Use university space, equipment etc.
Why an Institute?
Institutionalisation and mainstreaming of research means more fundable and legitimiate results-also means translational medicine and cross over to bedside treatment faster if invovled with NIA, NHS etc.
Why Rejuvenative Medicine?
Non-controversial yet still makes distinction between gerontology and ageing research and other plans such as SENS etc. It states that we want to study ageing to stop it-but only in a nice, quiet, polite way :D.
Strong student research program?
Get free, directed research, without needing large amounts of funding-use resources that already have and use resources of other institutes etc even ones not related directly to ageing.

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#23 Prometheus

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Posted 24 March 2009 - 02:28 PM

For one thing, it will take a very long time to develop treatments, because at present, our understanding of these pathways -- which are only described in the most general terms in your impressive document, which is none the less already a visibly elaborate and highly complex network -- is "woefully incomplete," and is likely to remain so for a very, very long time. For another, precisely because metabolism is so incredibly complexly interrelated, tinkering with one aspect inevitably ripples in unexpected ways through the entire system; thus, such perturbations of the body's normal metabolic regulatory systems pose an inherent risk of unanticipated consequences: our bodies are designed to operate as finely-balanced homeostatic systems, and interfering with the basic pathways underlying our normal functionality (especially in our current state of relative ignorance) inevitably causes undesired side-effects. And third, such an approach, since it can only slow the rate of accumulation of aging damage, can only be of very modest benefit to those whose bodies have already suffered significant amounts of aging damage, while the benefits and long-term risks of treatment will take many decades to become clear in the young.


Same old, same old.. Come on Michael, give it a rest - aside from advocacy and fund raising SENS has made no practical scientific progress since it was conceived. And you're providing the same old tired defense.

One hypothesis is as good as another.

#24 omnidoom

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Posted 24 March 2009 - 03:25 PM

Hey! Im at the bottom!
This is an outrage sir! An outrage!

The most obvious lists of people interested in ageing research- this would be IABG and SENS attendees, The Lifeboat Foundation members, MF and MFURI members, people that publish in SAGE KE, Rejuvenation research, members of IAH, Wolfson ageing labs, members of American Aging Association, British Society for Research into Ageing, Help the aged, institutes for regeneration at various universities etc

Ageing researchers:

Aubrey de Grey
Jeff Hall
Jan Vijg
Judith Campisi
Cynthia Kenyon
Joao Pedro de Magalhaes
Leonid Gavrilov and wife
Bob Lightowlers
Ian Holt
Karl Riabowol
Matthew Porteus
Fulvio Mavilio
Tom Kirkwood
Linda Partridge
David Gems
Jay Olshansky
Nadia Rosenthal
Richard Aspinall
David Rubinsztein
Alexandra Stolzing
Sebastian Sethe
Richard Faragher
Fabrizio d'Adda di Fagagna
Rita Effros
Ulf Brunk
Henry Weiner
Gerald Schatten
Irina Conboy
John Allen
Vernon Ingram
Calogero Caruso
Matthew Collins
Gabriele Saretzki
Thomas von Zglinicki
Deborah Dunn-Walters
Megan Sykes
Graham Pawelec
Rochelle Buffenstein
Silvia Gravina
George Church
Matthew Allen
Oliver Tussaint
Daniel Martinez
Danila Medvedev
Michael Rose
Maria Blasco
Manuel Serrano
Bruce Rittmann
David Harrison
John Sedivy
Judith Haendeler
Andrew Porter
Marisol Corral-Debrinski
Edward Masoro
Ana maria Cuervo
Chris Mason
A Bartke
Ruth Itzhaki
Stephen Minger

Students and misc:

Michael Rae
Ben Zealley
Matthias Bollman
Mike Kope
Sarah Marr
John Schloendorn
Mark Hamaleinen
Justin Rebo
Kelsey Moody
Sophie Lukowski
Sven Bulterijs
Johan Sjoberg
Stuart Calimport
Aaron Stupple
Lucas Trindade
Kemal Akman
Danila Medvedev
Tim Webb
Lijang Jiang
Jaques Mathieu
Soren Stirling



#25 caliban

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Posted 25 March 2009 - 06:27 PM

SPLIT: further discussion about SENS
http://www.imminst.o...showtopic=28654

#26 Illuminatusdarksoul

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Posted 26 March 2009 - 12:41 PM

http://whoswho.senes...info/people.php

That is a good list of researchers

#27 brokenportal

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Posted 26 March 2009 - 04:19 PM

I didnt realize a list like that existed. That list is useful in more ways than 10. So how do they decide who goes on that list?

#28 maestro949

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Posted 26 March 2009 - 04:29 PM

João Pedro de Magalhães manages the list. Here's his contact info from his website @ University of Liverpool.

#29 AgeVivo

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Posted 31 March 2009 - 08:53 AM

Today Russia can propose a global initiative to create an international project «Science Against Aging».
http://www.scienceagainstaging.com/

Impressive pdf presentation of the field!

...and impressive list of researchers to contact, leading to an impressive introduction of the impressive plan!

PS: for all the described sections of the document i'd like to underline that discovery results from a mix of theory, observation, and tests -- and plans and luck. In the specific field of science-against-aging, long-term tests (such as those competing for the MPrize) are -- along with plans -- probably the most lacking essential determinant (likely due to the 'long-term' feature) of discoveries. So, in or after the presentation, i feel much could be achieved by simply underlining that long-term-testing probably has the higher rate of return currently to improve understandings and strategies against aging.

Edited by AgeVivo, 31 March 2009 - 09:36 AM.


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#30 Illuminatusdarksoul

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Posted 06 April 2009 - 03:29 PM

http://www.sparc.ac.uk/funding.asp

Good funding search tool




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