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Resveratrol, Green Tea Extract, Curcumin, Oxaloacetic Acid, and MCT Oil all failed to extend mouse lifespan

resveratrol green tea curcumin oxaloacetic acid medium-chain triglyceride

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#1 smithx

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Posted 14 August 2012 - 01:28 AM


I posted this on the BeneGene thread, since BeneGene's 'active ingredient' apparently is oxaloacetic acid, but since this study deals with other popular supplements I thought it deserved its own thread:

J Gerontol A Biol Sci Med Sci. 2012 Mar 26. [Epub ahead of print]
Evaluation of Resveratrol, Green Tea Extract, Curcumin, Oxaloacetic Acid, and Medium-Chain Triglyceride Oil on Life Span of Genetically Heterogeneous Mice.

Strong R, Miller RA, Astle CM, Baur JA, de Cabo R, Fernandez E, Guo W, Javors M, Kirkland JL, Nelson JF, Sinclair DA, Teter B, Williams D, Zaveri N, Nadon NL, Harrison DE.

Source

Department of Pharmacology and Barshop Institute for Longevity and Aging Studies, 15355 Lambda Drive, University of Texas Health Science Center at San Antonio, TX 78245. strong@uthscsa.edu.

Abstract

The National Institute on Aging Interventions Testing Program (ITP) was established to evaluate agents that are hypothesized to increase life span and/or health span in genetically heterogeneous mice. Each compound is tested in parallel at three test sites. It is the goal of the ITP to publish all results, negative or positive. We report here on the results of lifelong treatment of mice, beginning at 4 months of age, with each of five agents, that is, green tea extract (GTE), curcumin, oxaloacetic acid, medium-chain triglyceride oil, and resveratrol, on the life span of genetically heterogeneous mice. Each agent was administered beginning at 4 months of age. None of these five agents had a statistically significant effect on life span of male or female mice, by log-rank test, at the concentrations tested, although a secondary analysis suggested that GTE might diminish the risk of midlife deaths in females only. PMID: 22451473 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]

http://www.ncbi.nlm....pubmed/22451473

#2 prophets

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Posted 14 August 2012 - 02:41 AM

Thx for posting this. If anyone can follow-up with the tables of statistics, I would be curious to see how strong the p-vals are.

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#3 smithx

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Posted 20 August 2012 - 12:54 AM

Can someone get this article so we can look at the dosing and and see if it does indeed invalidate life extension claims for all these compounds?

#4 joelcairo

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Posted 21 August 2012 - 02:42 PM

There's a brief criticism and a PDF of the full study on a site called Resveratrol News:

"They Did It Again: Overdosed Animals With Resveratrol And Then Said It Didn't Work"
http://www.resveratr...didnt-work/512/
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#5 joelcairo

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Posted 21 August 2012 - 02:57 PM

I'm not in a position to make a detailed scientific critique, but on reading the document the first thing I notice is that all 5 test groups did in fact live longer than the control group. But the effect was mainly in the 4%-5% range and did not achieve statistical significance given the sample size.

Edited by joelcairo, 21 August 2012 - 03:00 PM.

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#6 Kevnzworld

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Posted 21 August 2012 - 05:30 PM

Here is the chart from the study:

Table 1 Medium Survival for each Intervention pooled across sites for each gender.

Group Males Females

Control 786 (742-826) 866 (832- 891)
Curcumin 808 (744-838) 905 (836-933)
Green Tea 822 (769-880) 923 (887-939 )
Oxaloacetic acid 819 (756-857) 889 (859-937)
Resveratrol 813 (763-863) 907 (871-938)




One quote from the study.

" Similarly, it was reported that male C57BL/6NNia mice, fed TC the primary blood metabolite of curcumin, at a concentration of 2000 ppm in diet starting at 13 months, had an 11.7% greater mean life span as compared with mice fed the control diet, "

In the female mice group fed resveratrol, all of the mice lived longer than the medium survival of the controls.
Which mouse would you choose to be, a supplemented or control? I think I'm going to continue taking my resveratrol, gte, and curcumin!

Edited by Kevnzworld, 21 August 2012 - 06:09 PM.


#7 smithx

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Posted 21 August 2012 - 08:29 PM

Thanks for posting this. Do you have access to the dosing levels and schedule as well?

#8 Kevnzworld

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Posted 21 August 2012 - 11:02 PM

Link to the full study:



http://resveratrolce...ngevitStudy.pdf


#9 algae

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Posted 24 August 2012 - 01:52 AM

All nutrients cause harm in isolated poor quality forms, so the government and pharmaceutical companies constantly fund extract studies to discredit supplements. It's that simple, research cofactors...

Edited by algae, 24 August 2012 - 01:52 AM.

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#10 niner

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Posted 24 August 2012 - 11:48 AM

Hmm. GTE (to cite one example) extends median lifespan seven percent in a large, carefully run experiment by some of the most competent mouse facilities on the planet, and that's a failure? Was it a "failure" because it was "only" curve squaring?

#11 maxwatt

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Posted 24 August 2012 - 02:14 PM

For life extension, they define it as the longest lived 10%. So the most one (mouse) can live is no longer, but it seems more likely to reach that maximum, but not to exceed it.

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#12 Kevnzworld

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Posted 26 August 2012 - 07:43 AM

I wish they would have included a group of mice that would have been given all five of the supplements to see if there were any synergies.
I happened upon an old post from years ago that highlighted a study that showed a cocktail of vitamins/supplements produced an 11% increase in LS in normal mice.

http://www.longecity...ements-in-mice/





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