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Curcumin as a long-term cognitive enhancer

curcumin turmeric bdnf dopamine modulation alzheimers memory

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#1 norepinephrine

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Posted 16 April 2013 - 02:38 PM


I'm always surprised curcumin doesn't receive as much attention on the Brain Health forum as it does elsewhere here. It's certainly becoming one of the more well-studied nutritional supplements, and it affects many of the factors that people here target through other means: BDNF, dopamine modulation, cognitive protection against stress, working through cAMP, heavy metal chelation, anti-inflammatory effects, etc.

http://www.ncbi.nlm....les/PMC2929771/ provides a summary of curcumin's studied effects on depression, tardive dyskinesia and diabetic neuropathy.

An Overview of Curcumin in Neurological Disorders


S. K. Kulkarni* and A. Dhir1

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Abstract


Curcumin, the principal curcuminoid found in spice turmeric, has recently been studied for its active role in the treatment of various central nervous system disorders. Curcumin demonstrates neuroprotective action in Alzheimer's disease, tardive dyskinesia, major depression, epilepsy, and other related neurodegenerative and neuropsychiatric disorders. The mechanism of its neuroprotective action is not completely understood. However, it has been hypothesized to act majorly through its anti-inflammatory and antioxidant properties. Also, it is a potent inhibitor of reactive astrocyte expression and thus prevents cell death. Curcumin also modulates various neurotransmitter levels in the brain. The present review attempts to discuss some of the potential protective role of curcumin in animal models of major depression, tardive dyskinesia and diabetic neuropathy. These studies call for well planned clinical studies on curcumin for its potential use in neurological disorders.


http://www.jbiomedsc...content/17/1/43 shows evidence of curcumin modulating dopamine in a diabetic rat model.

Curcumin modulates dopaminergic receptor, CREB and phospholipase c gene expression in the cerebral cortex and cerebellum of streptozotocin induced diabetic rats


T Peeyush Kumar, Sherin Antony, G Gireesh, Naijil George and CS Paulose*









Author Affiliations



Molecular Neurobiology and Cell Biology Unit, Centre for Neuroscience, Cochin University of Science and Technology, Cochin- 682 022, Kerala, India

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Journal of Biomedical Science 2010, 17:43 doi:10.1186/1423-0127-17-43


Abstract


Curcumin, an active principle component in rhizome of Curcuma longa, has proved its merit for diabetes through its anti-oxidative and anti-inflammatory properties. This study aims at evaluating the effect of curcumin in modulating the altered dopaminergic receptors, CREB and phospholipase C in the cerebral cortex and cerebellum of STZ induced diabetic rats. Radioreceptor binding assays and gene expression was done in the cerebral cortex and cerebellum of male Wistar rats using specific ligands and probes. Total dopaminergic receptor binding parameter, Bmax showed an increase in cerebral cortex and decrease in the cerebellum of diabetic rats. Gene expression studies using real time PCR showed an increased expression of dopamine D1 and D2 receptor in the cerebral cortex of diabetic rats. In cerebellum dopamine D1 receptor was down regulated and D2 receptor showed an up regulation. Transcription factor CREB and phospholipase C showed a significant down regulation in cerebral cortex and cerebellum of diabetic rats. We report that curcumin supplementation reduces diabetes induced alteration of dopamine D1, D2 receptors, transcription factor CREB and phospholipase C to near control. Our results indicate that curcumin has a potential to regulate diabetes induced malfunctions of dopaminergic signalling, CREB and Phospholipase C expression in cerebral cortex and cerebellum and thereby improving the cognitive and emotional functions associated with these regions. Furthermore, in line with these studies an interaction between curcumin and dopaminergic receptors, CREB and phospholipase C is suggested, which attenuates the cortical and cerebellar dysfunction in diabetes. These results suggest that curcumin holds promise as an agent to prevent or treat CNS complications in diabetes.




According to early research from UCLA, curcumin coupled with vitamin D may help clear amyloid beta implicated in Alzheimer's: http://www.scienceda...90715131558.htm



http://www.ncbi.nlm....pubmed/19879308 An in-vitro study on rat neurons found BDNF activation:

Curcumin produces neuroprotective effects via activating brain-derived neurotrophic factor/TrkB-dependent MAPK and PI-3K cascades in rodent cortical neurons.

Wang R, Li YH, Xu Y, Li YB, Wu HL, Guo H, Zhang JZ, Zhang JJ, Pan XY, Li XJ.

Source

State Key Laboratory of Natural Biomimetic Drugs, Department of Pharmacology, School of Basic Medical Sciences, Peking University, Beijing, China.


Abstract


Curcumin is a major constituent of curcuma longa, a traditional medicine used to manage mental disorders effectively in China. The neuroprotective effects of curcumin have been demonstrated in our previous studies. In the present research, we confirmed this effect by showing that curcumin application promoted the viability of cultured rodent cortical neurons. Moreover, when neurons were pretreated with tyrosine kinase B (TrkB) antibody, known to inhibit the activity of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), the protective effect of curcumin was blocked. Additionally, treatment of curcumin increased BDNF and phosphor-TrkB and both of these enhancements can be suppressed by ERK and PI-3K inhibitors. The administration of curcumin led to increased levels of phosphor-ERK and AKT, which were each blocked by MAPK and PI-3K inhibitors. Furthermore, the curcumin-induced increase in phosphorylated cyclic AMP response element binding protein (CREB), which has been implicated as a possible mediator of antidepressant actions, was prevented by MAPK and PI-3K inhibitors. Therefore, we hypothesize the neuroprotection of curcumin might be mediated via BDNF/TrkB-MAPK/PI-3K-CREB signaling pathway.
Copyright 2009. Published by Elsevier Inc.

PMID: 19879308 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]




http://www.annalsofi...9;aulast=Mishra discusses an overview of curcumin's inhibitory effects on Alzheimer's.

The effect of curcumin (turmeric) on Alzheimer's disease: An overview

Shrikant Mishra, Kalpana Palanivelu
Department of Neurology, VA/ USC 16111, Sepulveda, CA, USA

Date of Submission 04-Nov-2007 Date of Decision 05-Feb-2008 Date of Acceptance 14-Feb-2008

Correspondence Address:
Shrikant Mishra
Department of Neurology, VA/ USC 16111, Plummer Street, Sepulveda, CA, 91343
USA
Posted Image

OI: 10.4103/0972-2327.40220
PMID: 19966973




This paper discusses the effects of curcumin on patients with Alzheimer's disease (AD). Curcumin (Turmeric), an ancient Indian herb used in curry powder, has been extensively studied in modern medicine and Indian systems of medicine for the treatment of various medical conditions, including cystic fibrosis, haemorrhoids, gastric ulcer, colon cancer, breast cancer, atherosclerosis, liver diseases and arthritis. It has been used in various types of treatments for dementia and traumatic brain injury. Curcumin also has a potential role in the prevention and treatment of AD. Curcumin as an antioxidant, anti-inflammatory and lipophilic action improves the cognitive functions in patients with AD. A growing body of evidence indicates that oxidative stress, free radicals, beta amyloid, cerebral deregulation caused by bio-metal toxicity and abnormal inflammatory reactions contribute to the key event in Alzheimer's disease pathology. Due to various effects of curcumin, such as decreased Beta-amyloid plaques, delayed degradation of neurons, metal-chelation, anti-inflammatory, antioxidant and decreased microglia formation, the overall memory in patients with AD has improved. This paper reviews the various mechanisms of actions of curcumin in AD and pathology.



http://www.ncbi.nlm....pubmed/15590663 shows evidence of BBB crossing and amyloid plaque reduction in injected rats:

Curcumin inhibits formation of amyloid beta oligomers and fibrils, binds plaques, and reduces amyloid in vivo.

Yang F, Lim GP, Begum AN, Ubeda OJ, Simmons MR, Ambegaokar SS, Chen PP, Kayed R, Glabe CG, Frautschy SA, Cole GM.

Source

Department of Medicine, UCLA, Los Angeles, CA 90095, USA.


Abstract


Alzheimer's disease (AD) involves amyloid beta (Abeta) accumulation, oxidative damage, and inflammation, and risk is reduced with increased antioxidant and anti-inflammatory consumption. The phenolic yellow curry pigment curcumin has potent anti-inflammatory and antioxidant activities and can suppress oxidative damage, inflammation, cognitive deficits, and amyloid accumulation. Since the molecular structure of curcumin suggested potential Abeta binding, we investigated whether its efficacy in AD models could be explained by effects on Abeta aggregation. Under aggregating conditions in vitro, curcumin inhibited aggregation (IC(50) = 0.8 microM) as well as disaggregated fibrillar Abeta40 (IC(50) = 1 microM), indicating favorable stoichiometry for inhibition. Curcumin was a better Abeta40 aggregation inhibitor than ibuprofen and naproxen, and prevented Abeta42 oligomer formation and toxicity between 0.1 and 1.0 microM. Under EM, curcumin decreased dose dependently Abeta fibril formation beginning with 0.125 microM. The effects of curcumin did not depend on Abeta sequence but on fibril-related conformation. AD and Tg2576 mice brain sections incubated with curcumin revealed preferential labeling of amyloid plaques. In vivo studies showed that curcumin injected peripherally into aged Tg mice crossed the blood-brain barrier and bound plaques. When fed to aged Tg2576 mice with advanced amyloid accumulation, curcumin labeled plaques and reduced amyloid levels and plaque burden. Hence, curcumin directly binds small beta-amyloid species to block aggregation and fibril formation in vitro and in vivo. These data suggest that low dose curcumin effectively disaggregates Abeta as well as prevents fibril and oligomer formation, supporting the rationale for curcumin use in clinical trials preventing or treating AD.


PMID: 15590663 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]



In summary, while there is mounting evidence to support curcumin's use from animal and in-vitro studies, there is still a dearth of direct, well-designed human studies. However, this remains the case for the majority of nootropics discussed on this board, but members of Longecity tend to be more speculative and optimistic of preliminary data than the average person. Thus, curcumin poses merit alongside other supplements like uridine, ALCAR, lion's mane et al. as a long-term cognitive enhancer.

Edited by norepinephrine, 16 April 2013 - 02:43 PM.

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#2 Godof Smallthings

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Posted 16 April 2013 - 03:08 PM

Curcumin has indeed produced great results in rats and in vitro tests, but these results have not been duplicated in human testing due to very poor bioavailability. I think the pharmaceutical companies are not performing more human tests for the following reasons:

1. They can't patent curcuminoids as they are naturally occurring substances, and drugs that cannot become major money makers are discarded in favour of drugs that can.
2. All these potential good effects based on rat tests have little significance given the poor bioavailability in humans after oral dosing.
3. They may be busy trying to invent compounds that act similarly to curcumin but are artificial, instead, in order to be able to monetize.

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#3 norepinephrine

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Posted 16 April 2013 - 03:16 PM

Thanks for the remarks. I should add that, for anyone planning on taking curcumin, the following are necessary:

1) Piperine (black pepper extract), to boost absorption 20-fold.

Influence of piperine on the pharmacokinetics of curcumin in animals and human volunteers.

Shoba G, Joy D, Joseph T, Majeed M, Rajendran R, Srinivas PS.

Source

Department of Pharmacology, St. John's Medical College, Bangalore, India.


Abstract


The medicinal properties of curcumin obtained from Curcuma longa L. cannot be utilised because of poor bioavailability due to its rapid metabolism in the liver and intestinal wall. In this study, the effect of combining piperine, a known inhibitor of hepatic and intestinal glucuronidation, was evaluated on the bioavailability of curcumin in rats and healthy human volunteers. When curcumin was given alone, in the dose 2 g/kg to rats, moderate serum concentrations were achieved over a period of 4 h. Concomitant administration of piperine 20 mg/kg increased the serum concentration of curcumin for a short period of 1-2 h post drug. Time to maximum was significantly increased (P < 0.02) while elimination half life and clearance significantly decreased (P < 0.02), and the bioavailability was increased by 154%. On the other hand in humans after a dose of 2 g curcumin alone, serum levels were either undetectable or very low. Concomitant administration of piperine 20 mg produced much higher concentrations from 0.25 to 1 h post drug (P < 0.01 at 0.25 and 0.5 h; P < 0.001 at 1 h), the increase in bioavailability was 2000%. The study shows that in the dosages used, piperine enhances the serum concentration, extent of absorption and bioavailability of curcumin in both rats and humans with no adverse effects.

PMID: 9619120 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]


2) Given the evidence in my post above, it'd be pertinent to stack curcumin with vitamin D as well.

3) Finally, fish oil is a popular supplement on most of this forum, but it should be reiterated that taking curcumin with a healthy fat source like omega-3's should also enhance absorption. (http://lpi.oregonsta...icals/curcumin/ discusses the fat soluble nature of curcuminoids, as well as various benefits found.)

Edited by norepinephrine, 16 April 2013 - 03:16 PM.


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#4 freeman

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Posted 16 April 2013 - 07:03 PM

See also:
Curcumin targeted signaling pathways: basis for anti-photoaging and anti-carcinogenic therapy

Photocarcinogenesis is caused by DNA damage from solar radiation in the ultraviolet range, resulting in the development of both melanoma and non-melanoma skin cancers. Although the ultraviolet B (UVB) spectrum has previously been considered the more carcinogenic of the two, recent evidence suggests that ultraviolet A (UVA) irradiation may have damaging effects that are not generally appreciated. Furthermore, it is becoming apparent that although sunscreens have been in use for many years, they are relatively ineffective in protecting against UVA-induced photoaging and UVA-induced skin cancers. More recently, attention has been directed on certain dietary phytochemicals, in particular curcumin, in the attempt to repair photodamaged skin as a means of preventing degeneration into solar-induced skin cancers. Curcumin has been shown to protect against the deleterious effects of injury by attenuating oxidative stress and suppressing inflammation. In this review, the curcumin-targeted signaling pathways directed against solar-induced injury are reviewed. The ability of curcumin to block multiple targets on these pathways serve as a basis for the potential use of this phytochemical in photoaging skin and photocarcinogenesis.


I started taking it as I'd heard a number of people having anecdotal success with it reducing keratosis (likely as a result of the antiinflammatory properties), have had success with that, and as time goes on and I read more about curcumin it seems to be a pretty safe and useful addition to any life-extension oriented stack.

#5 Rethar

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Posted 16 April 2013 - 07:08 PM

I've been taking curcumin regularly for about a month and it has a place in my stack if I'm ever having any low mood problems. I've tried one curcumin+piperine product and another biocurcumin (BCM-95). I'm not a big fan of the one with piperine, it made me feel a bit odd, and when I took it along with my multivitamin I think it enhanced the absorption of all the vitamins way too much because I felt odd there too. The curcumin+piperine gave me more of a mood boost than the biocurcumin but the feeling wasn't as clean. Plus the biocurcumin feels like it lasts longer.The biocurcumin/BCM-95 is supposed to have some formulation which enhances the bioavailability without using piperine.

Took 1 biocurcumin twice a day for most of the time I've tried it. I've used only one a day before but I like two a day to get better BDNF boosting effects long-term. Benefits were that it took the edge off depressive feelings. Didn't totally relieve them but they weren't as bad, kinda like going from a -8 in terms of mood to a -4. Plus it made me more relaxed in a subtle way. For instance I remember when I first started taking it, I had been under a lot of stress to the point that even typing I'd kind of type in a stressed, tense way. But after I took the curcumin I noticed that my fingers were relaxed when typing, so I guess it does have some nice effects against stress. I have anxiety issues, it didn't really touch those, in fact it gave me a constant small amount of anxious energy that is a negative (I guess because it increases norepi through its MAO-AI action), but I like the antidepressant effects to the point that I can deal with that slight side effect. It also decreased my libido(the biocurcumin, I'm not sure if the curcumin+piperine did), but not in like the weird ways things like SSRI's do, it just took it down a few levels to where I was less interested.

Best thing I've found about it though are that I've never gotten any type of tolerance to it, it's pretty much the same effect each time I take it, no withdrawal or anything using normal doses.

I've also tried 2 biocurcumin twice a day for about a week. Again, good for the antidepressive effect, just...expensive.

I've tried the biocurcumin sublingually mixed with a little bit of olive oil and I've noticed this increases the effects a LOT (but with a shorter duration of action). Using one sublingually makes me feel a bit like I'm on a cloud, but starts to fade pretty quickly like maybe lasts only 1-2hours. Using two SL made me feel even better but it started to affect my judgement speed. Hard to describe but it was like it made me a bit ditzy, like after drinking alcohol and it gets harder to pay enough attention to things but not as extreme, so I wouldn't be comfortable doing something like driving after taking that. Well...I decided to push things further another time and try out three sublingual biocurcumin at once (first I took two sublingually then maybe 20minutes later I took another SL). This was bad. First, it made me seriously feel high and like everything was great. So I guess I liked it at first, but then after I don't know an hour or two I actually had this huge crash and my mood plummeted into the ground. It was definitely some kind of withdrawal thing going on. So that dose for me was way too much. I don't take any curcumin sublingually anymore mainly because that impaired mental coordination effect is a little weird, and the effects don't last as long. I've never had any of that mental coordination impairment with taking it the normal route.

#6 Mind

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Posted 16 April 2013 - 07:50 PM

I don't take many supplements, but I did just buy the super-biocurcumin because it was on sale and because it has some positive possibilities for health, but I am not too optimistic for this supp because most of the data comes from rodent and in vitro studies.

Other discussions here at LongeCity:

http://www.longecity...min-supplement/

http://www.longecity...-effectiveness/

http://www.longecity...rcumin-at-home/

http://www.longecity...ic-stroke-risk/
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#7 freeman

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Posted 16 April 2013 - 08:16 PM

I've been taking curcumin regularly for about a month and it has a place in my stack if I'm ever having any low mood problems. I've tried one curcumin+piperine product and another biocurcumin (BCM-95). I'm not a big fan of the one with piperine, it made me feel a bit odd, and when I took it along with my multivitamin I think it enhanced the absorption of all the vitamins way too much because I felt odd there too. The curcumin+piperine gave me more of a mood boost than the biocurcumin but the feeling wasn't as clean. Plus the biocurcumin feels like it lasts longer.The biocurcumin/BCM-95 is supposed to have some formulation which enhances the bioavailability without using piperine.


Your post reminded me to post what I've been using: I've used the Jarrows Curcumin 95, which I believe makes use of the same BCM-95 curcuminoid mixture.

I've shyed away from the curcumin+piperine mixtures because I really don't see any good reason to be inhibiting CYP34A or P-glycoprotein (if there is, please let me know). In the case of CYP34A it's mostly since I like my caffeine clearance right where it is and really dislike changes in my sertraline (SSRI) blood levels.

Another option for improved curcumin absorption is the curcumin-phosphatidylcholine complex "Meriva" which I have yet to try.

#8 Adaptogen

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Posted 17 April 2013 - 05:39 AM

I've been taking a teaspoon of turmeric with black pepper twice a day, saturated in olive oil, for about two weeks now. I assume that this is effective, the pipernine in black pepper supposedly increases bioavailability 20-fold.

Primary effects I have noted so far are:
clearer, healthier looking skin, more energy/motivation for physical activity, reduced muscle soreness, cognitive enhancement, and mood elevation. The nootropic effects seem comparable to a moderate dose of piracetam. Of course all of these are very subjective.

I also notice I get very thirsty within 30 minutes of taking my daily dose, I'm not sure why this would be. Something I also notice with ashwagandha.

#9 panhedonic

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Posted 18 April 2013 - 03:16 AM

Doesn't curcumin lower libido, at least in men?

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#10 Adaptogen

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Posted 18 April 2013 - 06:28 AM

I haven't noticed anything. I googled turmeric+libido and most of the links mention it as a supplement for raising men's sex drive and decreasing women's?

#11 Godof Smallthings

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Posted 18 April 2013 - 08:58 AM

Doesn't curcumin lower libido, at least in men?


[Insert reflection about the population size of India, Pakistan and Bangladesh and their preference for turmeric here]
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#12 BlueCloud

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Posted 23 April 2013 - 12:51 PM

Doesn't curcumin lower libido, at least in men?


[Insert reflection about the population size of India, Pakistan and Bangladesh and their preference for turmeric here]


If it does lower libido, maybe that effect is counteracted by some other substance commonly taken in their food ...

#13 hippocampus

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Posted 23 April 2013 - 09:58 PM

I find that it does lower libido for me, maybe it has something to do with serotonin (it's MAOI), but I also read somewhere that it may be connected with mTOR inhibition (kind of a double edge sword ...). It also lowers cravings for whatever, first month I started taking turmeric I just quit using snus spontaneously, I really didn't crave it ... but then this effects has somewhat disappeared or at least isn't as noticeable.

#14 Raptor87

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Posted 24 April 2013 - 01:06 AM

Would this work for regular muscle stiffness and cramps?

#15 Godof Smallthings

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Posted 24 April 2013 - 01:09 AM

It does help my muscle stiffness and creaky joints. Combine it with daily light exercise and stretching and you should be rid of your symptoms quite quickly.

#16 BioFreak

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Posted 24 April 2013 - 12:24 PM

Longvida curcumin seems to get through the bbb and has the highest bioavailability in humans from what I know. My grandma does take it, and it helps a lot with dementia(together with high dose gingko). She was in the hospital not so long ago, and she didn't take her supps and in a very short time developed massive dementia symptoms. A few days later I got her supplements and most symptoms diminished within an hour after intake, 90% within a day. Although it seems that it does only halt(slow down) and not reverse dementia. While her symptoms greatly improved, she now has a lot of additional mental problems she did not have before, although not at the scale from the time in the hospital(like greatly diminished acute symptoms, but more/stronger chronic symptoms...) This is with a dosage of 1000mg longvida curcumin daily. Quite expensive though, that stuff...

But she was taking curcumin for 2 years prior to this accident, and she was mostly fine (slight dementia only). To me it seems like curcumin was able to stop dementia, or masking its symptoms, while stopping the treatment rapidly accelerated her progress. Its like dementia wanted to make up for the time it could not progress...

Unfortunately, curcumin alone is not enough now.

I have tried it too, and its effects were somewhat feelable (a bit more focus, a bit less brain fog) but seemed to diminish over time. For me, the price too high for that little effect on me. My grandma still takes it.

#17 8bitmore

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Posted 24 April 2013 - 02:04 PM

Longvida curcumin seems to get through the bbb and has the highest bioavailability in humans from what I know. My grandma does take it, and it helps a lot with dementia(together with high dose gingko). She was in the hospital not so long ago, and she didn't take her supps and in a very short time developed massive dementia symptoms.
[...]
I have tried it too, and its effects were somewhat feelable (a bit more focus, a bit less brain fog) but seemed to diminish over time. For me, the price too high for that little effect on me. My grandma still takes it.

I would seriously recommend buying the organic powder in bulk* and capping it yourself (in 500mg caps) - I used this method in the past and it worked brilliantly (cured my partner of bad symptoms from endometriosis when taken in 6-8 pills with meals during the day (took a year though so patience/persistence is key here, immediately relief came quite early though; after 1-2 weeks or so)) and much more economically too. You can write here if you help on where to buy the materials. :)

*Compared to extracts my experience have unilaterally pointed towards the raw powder being more efficient/strong-in-its-effects.

#18 BioFreak

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Posted 24 April 2013 - 02:45 PM

Longvida curcumin seems to get through the bbb and has the highest bioavailability in humans from what I know. My grandma does take it, and it helps a lot with dementia(together with high dose gingko). She was in the hospital not so long ago, and she didn't take her supps and in a very short time developed massive dementia symptoms.
[...]
I have tried it too, and its effects were somewhat feelable (a bit more focus, a bit less brain fog) but seemed to diminish over time. For me, the price too high for that little effect on me. My grandma still takes it.

I would seriously recommend buying the organic powder in bulk* and capping it yourself (in 500mg caps) - I used this method in the past and it worked brilliantly (cured my partner of bad symptoms from endometriosis when taken in 6-8 pills with meals during the day (took a year though so patience/persistence is key here, immediately relief came quite early though; after 1-2 weeks or so)) and much more economically too. You can write here if you help on where to buy the materials. :)

*Compared to extracts my experience have unilaterally pointed towards the raw powder being more efficient/strong-in-its-effects.


Yeah I'd be interested in sources, that'd be great. But for my grandmother, I think this might not be working, since my primary concern is her brain and curcumin by itself seems to have a hard time crossing the bbb.

#19 Logic

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Posted 24 April 2013 - 05:24 PM

Yeah I'd be interested in sources, that'd be great. But for my grandmother, I think this might not be working, since my primary concern is her brain and curcumin by itself seems to have a hard time crossing the bbb.


You may want to look for Turnbuckle's posts on using Niacin (B3) and Methylene Blue to clear amyloid beta plaque from the brain.

Also the MCTs in Coconut Oil act as an alternate source of energy for the brain cells when they loose their ability to use the conventional energy source.
This is becoming known as Diabetes type 3 and Coconut or MCT oil is being used to great effect by people with this type of Alzheimer's.

Also note that low dose Lithium is highly protective of brain cells, unless they are pre cancerous; then it kills them.

Also perhaps look up Mr Happy's Uridine-Choline-DHA stack and the CILTEP stack here.

Then there's Magnesium, Zinc and the B vitamins, as you probably know.

Also; isn't good old Turmeric supposed to increase Curcumin's bioavailability dramatically?
I'm sure I read that here somewhere.
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#20 8bitmore

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Posted 24 April 2013 - 05:43 PM

Longvida curcumin seems to get through the bbb and has the highest bioavailability in humans from what I know. My grandma does take it, and it helps a lot with dementia(together with high dose gingko). She was in the hospital not so long ago, and she didn't take her supps and in a very short time developed massive dementia symptoms.
[...]
I have tried it too, and its effects were somewhat feelable (a bit more focus, a bit less brain fog) but seemed to diminish over time. For me, the price too high for that little effect on me. My grandma still takes it.

I would seriously recommend buying the organic powder in bulk* and capping it yourself (in 500mg caps) - I used this method in the past and it worked brilliantly (cured my partner of bad symptoms from endometriosis when taken in 6-8 pills with meals during the day (took a year though so patience/persistence is key here, immediately relief came quite early though; after 1-2 weeks or so)) and much more economically too. You can write here if you help on where to buy the materials. :)

*Compared to extracts my experience have unilaterally pointed towards the raw powder being more efficient/strong-in-its-effects.


Yeah I'd be interested in sources, that'd be great. But for my grandmother, I think this might not be working, since my primary concern is her brain and curcumin by itself seems to have a hard time crossing the bbb.


First of all, I wouldn't worry about turmeric ability to work on the brain, even if you just read this thread through you can find example (Adaptogen's) of someone feeling strong effect on brain from using powdered turmeric alone: It's all about dose in my opinion: take a decent amount like I suggested and like Adaptogen is likewise doing and the effects will be substantially better.
Anyway :) for capping I recommend "Cap-M-Quik", you can buy them off ebay cheaply (make sure to get model that supports 00 sizes for 500mg medium sized caps) and then complement with a bag of empty veggie/gelatine 00 capsules depending on your inclinations (I would go for veggie personally). The powder I get in 500 gram organic packs wholesale from local health cooperative very cheaply (~$9) but I'm sure you can find it online/ebay for similar prices, hope this helps.

Also: totally listen to Logic's point about M. Blue and Niacin but also be aware that both supplements can have side-effects so, in my experience, they require more monitoring of the patient!

#21 BioFreak

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Posted 25 April 2013 - 08:49 AM

Yeah I'd be interested in sources, that'd be great. But for my grandmother, I think this might not be working, since my primary concern is her brain and curcumin by itself seems to have a hard time crossing the bbb.


You may want to look for Turnbuckle's posts on using Niacin (B3) and Methylene Blue to clear amyloid beta plaque from the brain.

Also the MCTs in Coconut Oil act as an alternate source of energy for the brain cells when they loose their ability to use the conventional energy source.
This is becoming known as Diabetes type 3 and Coconut or MCT oil is being used to great effect by people with this type of Alzheimer's.

Also note that low dose Lithium is highly protective of brain cells, unless they are pre cancerous; then it kills them.

Also perhaps look up Mr Happy's Uridine-Choline-DHA stack and the CILTEP stack here.

Then there's Magnesium, Zinc and the B vitamins, as you probably know.

Also; isn't good old Turmeric supposed to increase Curcumin's bioavailability dramatically?
I'm sure I read that here somewhere.


Lots of good info here, thanks. I am aware of turnbuckle's niacin and methylene blue experience, however I am a bit reluctant to try it with my grandma, since it's primarily a hypothesis and case study by him/of him. I keep it in mind however.

I already have lithium here, but how do you know that low dose lithium is capable of this? Note that I am taking it myself for this reason, low dose, but if you have studies with low dose lithium showing these results I would be interested in seeing them.

I am not sure if clitep would help in my grandma's case as it "only" improves memory through artificial stress by increasing camp. But I am already thinking about the uridine stack, as it shows great promise in neuroregeneration.

Edited by BioFreak, 25 April 2013 - 08:50 AM.


#22 BioFreak

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Posted 25 April 2013 - 08:59 AM

First of all, I wouldn't worry about turmeric ability to work on the brain, even if you just read this thread through you can find example (Adaptogen's) of someone feeling strong effect on brain from using powdered turmeric alone: It's all about dose in my opinion: take a decent amount like I suggested and like Adaptogen is likewise doing and the effects will be substantially better.
Anyway :) for capping I recommend "Cap-M-Quik", you can buy them off ebay cheaply (make sure to get model that supports 00 sizes for 500mg medium sized caps) and then complement with a bag of empty veggie/gelatine 00 capsules depending on your inclinations (I would go for veggie personally). The powder I get in 500 gram organic packs wholesale from local health cooperative very cheaply (~$9) but I'm sure you can find it online/ebay for similar prices, hope this helps.

Also: totally listen to Logic's point about M. Blue and Niacin but also be aware that both supplements can have side-effects so, in my experience, they require more monitoring of the patient!


Hmm. There are so many studies saying that curcumin is not available on its own to the human brain, then again in india there are less degenerative brain diseases and they consume a lot of curcumin daily, although not isolated, you have a point there. Then again, how good the bbb works in individuals is individual :) . The problem with my grandma is that I can't give her much more pills, and if you are right and it is about dosage, then this is a problem right there for her. It's not for me however. But I am fairly certain that longvida curcumin is working for her *fingers crossed*.

⌛⇒ MITOMOUSE has been fully funded!

#23 BioFreak

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Posted 25 April 2013 - 10:18 AM

ergo-log wrote an article about longvida curcumin:
http://ergo-log.com/...thy-people.html

#24 Turnbuckle

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Posted 25 April 2013 - 11:11 AM

If you're going to take curcumin, don't just swallow it, brush your teeth with it first.
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#25 BioFreak

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Posted 26 April 2013 - 07:53 AM

Hehe. I gonna try it. How long to see results, and how much can be expected?

#26 Justchill

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Posted 30 July 2013 - 11:14 AM

I've been taking a teaspoon of turmeric with black pepper twice a day, saturated in olive oil, for about two weeks now. I assume that this is effective, the pipernine in black pepper supposedly increases bioavailability 20-fold.

Primary effects I have noted so far are:
clearer, healthier looking skin, more energy/motivation for physical activity, reduced muscle soreness, cognitive enhancement, and mood elevation. The nootropic effects seem comparable to a moderate dose of piracetam. Of course all of these are very subjective.

I also notice I get very thirsty within 30 minutes of taking my daily dose, I'm not sure why this would be. Something I also notice with ashwagandha.


Hi that's looking good, makes me want to try this healthy combo also.
What are your dosages?

Cheers.

#27 Justchill

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Posted 30 July 2013 - 11:20 AM

Also where can you buy good quality Turmeric powder? (Iherb?)

#28 Logic

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Posted 31 July 2013 - 07:04 PM

High iron, copper levels block brain-cell DNA repair
http://medicalxpress...brain-cell.html

"...The researchers got a surprise when they tested substances that bond to iron and copper and could protect NEIL1 from the metals. One of the strongest protective agents was the common South Asian spice curcumin, which also has been shown to have other beneficial health effects.

"The results from curcumin were quite beautiful, actually," Hegde said. "It was very effective in maintaining NEIL activity in cells exposed to both copper and iron."

#29 nickthird

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Posted 31 July 2013 - 11:26 PM

I've been doing some research on curcumin recently for a family member.

First of all if you are buying powder make sure you buy the standardized 95% curcuminoids extract which is what they use in the studies (turmeric contains about 0.3-5% curcuminoids, one of which is curcamin ~70% of curcuminoids as I recall). When they say curcamin in the studies they mean the 95% curcuminoid extract which has other curcuminoids, not all of which are named.

There are three known ways to improve the bioavailability of curcumin that I have read about:
1. Black pepper/BioPerine (around 5$ for 10mg x 120caps in amazon)
2. Mirconize the powder.
3. Chemically bind the curcamine to some other substance that is more readily absorbed.
(4). Add some oils from the root of turmeric that for some reason increase absorption

The thing is each method has different effects on the absorption of each curcuminoid, and different profile for bioavailability in different organs. It's not just blood levels that matter.
I'm looking for bone penetration, if anyone has info on this please do share.

So the cheapest options for curcumine as defined $/gram in terms of absorbed curcumin (adjusting for bioavailability):
1. 0.05$/gram Minerva 500mg x 180 caps (Doctors Best Meriva½ Phytosome Curcumins on amazon)
The curcumin is bound to another substance that has very good absorption (see study: 450mg minerva = 4g curcumin)
2. 0.05$/gram? Theracurmin (Natural Factors Curcuminrich Turmeric Root Extract on amazon)
They micronize the powder and add some oils. I'm not sure how to calculate this one, the study suggests 30 fold absorption but I'm not sure if they multiplied the net curcumin
or the whole Theracurmin (which is about 10% cucrumin). Here is a video about the product.
3. Biomor cucumin (about 7 times the absorption) see details here

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#30 maxwatt

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Posted 31 July 2013 - 11:44 PM

I've been doing some research on curcumin recently for a family member.
...
I'm looking for bone penetration, if anyone has info on this please do share.
...


Thank your for the research. Bone penetration...for Multiple Myeloma? Here is one protocol by a smoldering myeloma patient: Margaret's Corner .





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