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Mi tinnitus is almost gone after one single dose of Cat's Claw.

cat claw tinnitus

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#1 William Sterog

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Posted 11 December 2014 - 01:58 PM


I was having problems lately because of noise exposition in my right ear, the tinnitus was driving me insane, messing up with my dream time, disturbing my labor as compositor... And then I read that:

 

http://www.ncbi.nlm....pubmed/21762882

 

 

 

This study tested the hypothesis that hydrophilic chemotypes of the medicinal vine Uncaria tomentosa (UT) would facilitate recovery of sensorineural functions following exposure to a damaging level of noise. The particular chemotypes investigated were carboxy alkyl esters (CAE) which are known to exhibit multifunctional cytoprotective properties that include: enhanced cellular DNA repair, antioxidation and anti-inflammation. Long-Evans rats were divided into four treatment groups: vehicle-control, noise-only, CAE-only and CAE+noise. The noise exposure was an 8kHz octave band of noise at 105dB SPL for 4h. Outer hair cell (OHC) function was measured with the cubic 2f(1)-f(2) distortion product otoacoustic emissions (DPOAE) at the start of the study (baseline) and at time-points that corresponded to 1day, 1week and 4weeks post-noise exposure to determine within-group effects. Compound action potentials to puretone stimuli were recorded from the VIIIth craniofacial nerve at 4weeks post-noise exposure to determine between-group effects. Additionally, cytocochleograms were constructed for each row of OHCs from each group. Noise exposure produced significant sensorineural impairments. However, CAE treatment facilitated almost complete recovery of OHC function and limited the magnitude of cell loss. The loss of neural sensitivity to puretone stimuli was inhibited with CAE treatment. Therefore, it appears that the multifunctional cytoprotective capacity of CAE from UT may generalize to otoprotection from acoustic over-exposure.

 

I was desperated so I come to an herborist and bought a bottle of Uncaria Tomentosa.

 

When I take it I feel really strange, like floating on a drug, happy and relax. Maybe de NMDA antagonist, maybe the Mao-B inhibition, I don't think placebo, I've been taking tons of supplements and no one feels like this before. It feels like a really soft cannaboid intoxication. Then I went to my guitar lessons, came back home and fall sleep.

 

Today, the noise is easly half anoying than it was yesterday, not completely gone but certainly reduced. So, if you are desperated too, you may be interested in giving it a chance.

 

By the way, some of the alkaloids found in this herb (and family) looks really promising.

 

Dynamic compartmentalization of DNA repair proteins within spiral ganglion neurons in response to noise stress.

 
Effects of Uncaria tomentosa total alkaloid and its components on experimental amnesia in mice: elucidation using the passive avoidance test.

http://www.ncbi.nlm....pubmed/11197086

 

Isorhynchophylline treatment improves the amyloid-β-induced cognitive impairment in rats via inhibition of neuronal apoptosis and tau protein hyperphosphorylation.

http://www.ncbi.nlm....pubmed/24164737

 

Neuroprotective effects of rhynchophylline against ischemic brain injury via regulation of the Akt/mTOR and TLRs signaling pathways.

http://www.ncbi.nlm....pubmed/25079660

 

Excuse my english. 

 

Off-topic: I consider this the perfect composition to forget about tinnitus for a while.

 

https://www.youtube....h?v=J1vs3Xb7K0o


Edited by William Sterog, 11 December 2014 - 02:11 PM.

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#2 William Sterog

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Posted 23 June 2015 - 01:05 PM

I'm taking Rhynchophylla and I think this herbs (Uncaria Family) are extremely underrated.

 

Geissoschizine methyl ether, an alkaloid from the Uncaria hook, improves remyelination after cuprizone-induced demyelination in medial prefrontal cortex of adult mice.

 

http://www.ncbi.nlm....pubmed/24190599

 

 

 

Accumulating evidence indicates that the medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC) is a site of myelin and oligodendrocyte abnormalities that contribute to psychotic symptoms of schizophrenia. The development of therapeutic approaches to enhance remyelination, a regenerative process in which new myelin sheaths are formed on demyelinated axons, may be an attractive remedial strategy. Geissoschizine methyl ether (GM) in the Uncaria hook, a galenical constituent of the traditional Japanese medicine yokukansan (Yi-gan san), is one of the active components responsible for the psychotropic effects of yokukansan, though little is known about the mechanisms underlying the effects of either that medicine or GM itself. In the present study, we employed a cuprizone (CPZ)-induced demyelination model and examined the cellular changes in response to GM administration during the remyelination phase in the mPFC of adult mice. Using the mitotic marker 5-bromo-2'-deoxyuridine (BrdU), we demonstrated that CPZ treatment significantly increased the number of BrdU-positive NG2 cells, as well as microglia and mature oligodendrocytes in the mPFC. Newly formed oligodendrocytes were increased by GM administration after CPZ exposure. In addition, GM attenuated a decrease in myelin basic protein immunoreactivity caused by CPZ administration. Taken together, our findings suggest that GM administration ameliorated the myelin deficit by mature oligodendrocyte formation and remyelination in the mPFC of CPZ-fed mice. The present findings provide experimental evidence supporting the role for GM and its possible use as a remedy for schizophrenia symptoms by promoting the differentiation of progenitor cells to and myelination by oligodendrocytes.

 

Uncarinic Acid C Isolated from Uncaria rhynchophylla Induces Differentiation of Th1-Promoting Dendritic Cells Through TLR4 Signaling.

 

http://www.ncbi.nlm....pubmed/21499439

 

 

 

Uncarinic acid C (URC) is triterpene isolated from Uncaria rhynchophylla and is a pharmacologically active substance. The induction of dendritic cells (DC) is critical for the induction of Ag-specific T lymphocyte responses and may be essential for the development of human vaccines relying on T cell immunity. DC might be a potential target for URC. We demonstrate that URC activates human DC as documented by phenotypic and functional maturation, and altered cytokine production. The expression of CD1a, CD38, CD40, CD54, CD80, CD83, CD86, HLA-DR and CCR7 on URC-primed DC was enhanced. The production of IL-12p70 by URC-primed DC was higher than that of lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-primed DC. The production of IL-12p70 by URC-primed DC was inhibited by the anti-Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) monoclonal antibody (mAb), but partially abolished by anti-TLR2 mAb. mRNA coding for TLR2 and TLR4 was expressed in URC-primed DC. URC-primed DC induced the NF-κB transcription factor. Naïve T cells co-cultured with URC-primed DC turned into typical Th1 cells that produced large quantities of IFN-γ depending on IL-12 secretion. URC enhanced the T cell stimulatory capacity in an allo MLR. In the cytotoxic T-lymphocyte assay (CTL) assay, DNA fragmentation assay and (51)Cr release on URC-primed DC were more augmented than that of TNF-α-primed DC. DC matured with URC had an intermediate migratory capacity towards CCL19 and CCL21. These results suggest that URC modulates DC function in a fashion that favors Th1 polarization via the activation of IL-12p70 dependent on TLR4 signaling, and may be used on DC-based vaccine for cancer immunotherapy.

 

Inhibition of phospholipase cgamma1 and cancer cell proliferation by triterpene esters from Uncaria rhynchophylla.

 

http://www.ncbi.nlm....pubmed/10869194

 

 

 

Investigation of the hooks of Uncaria rhynchophylla resulted in isolation of six phospholipase Cgamma1 (PLCgamma1) inhibitors (1-6). The structures of these compounds were elucidated as pentacyclic triterpene esters by spectroscopic and chemical analysis. Three of them, namely uncarinic acids C (1), D (2), and E (3), are newly reported as natural products. All the compounds showed dose-dependent inhibitory activities against PLCgamma1 in vitro with IC(50) values of 9.5-44.6 microM and inhibited the proliferation of human cancer cells with IC(50) values of 0.5-6.5 microg/mL

 

Geissoschizine methyl ether has third-generation antipsychotic-like actions at the dopamine and serotonin receptors.

 

http://www.ncbi.nlm....pubmed/21951966

 

Aripiprazole has made a significant contribution to the treatment of schizophrenia and related disorders. It has improved its safety and tolerability profiles, and these effects have been attributed to its pharmacological profile at the serotonin 5-HT and dopamine D(2) receptors. To discover compounds that have a similar pharmacological profile, we introduced a generic single-cell-based calcium imaging assay that standardizes the readouts from various assays used in previous studies on aripiprazole. In the present assay, the efficacy and potency of known ligands of serotonin 5-HT(1A), 5-HT(2A), 5-HT(2C), 5-HT(7) and dopamine D(2L) receptors were comparable to those found in previous studies using a variety of readouts. The developed assay was also able to reproduce the partial agonist activity, the low intrinsic activity and the selective activation of aripiprazole at the dopamine D(2L) receptors. Under identical experimental conditions, geissoschizine methyl ether (GM), a plant indole alkaloid, behaved as a partial agonist at the serotonin 5-HT(1A) receptor, a partial agonist/antagonist at the dopamine D(2L) receptor and an antagonist at the serotonin 5-HT(2A), 5-HT(2C) and 5-HT(7) receptors. Interestingly, GM showed a relatively low intrinsic activity and evoked a partial activation response in a subset of cells expressing the dopamine D(2L) receptor; both of these effects were similarly observed for aripiprazole. Although GM is far less potent at the dopamine receptor than aripiprazole at dopamine D(2L) receptors (EC(50)=4.4 μM for GM vs. EC(50)=56 nM for aripiprazole), GM and GM derivatives may comprise a new set of candidates for atypical antipsychotics.  

Edited by William Sterog, 23 June 2015 - 01:06 PM.

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#3 Flex

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Posted 23 June 2015 - 11:27 PM

Nice, thx :)



#4 Kalliste

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Posted 24 June 2015 - 09:13 AM

Was your tinnitus acute or chronic?

I have chronic tinnitus since many years and nothing removes that as far as I know.

Cognitive therapy was the only thing that ever helped me deal with it.



#5 Jochen

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Posted 24 June 2015 - 10:00 AM

Was your tinnitus acute or chronic?

I have chronic tinnitus since many years and nothing removes that as far as I know.

Cognitive therapy was the only thing that ever helped me deal with it.

 

Hey Cosmicalstorm, I need to dig up some studies but I recall neurofeedback could assist with this. Will let you know once I have found the studies.


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#6 Jochen

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Posted 24 June 2015 - 10:28 AM

Quick Neurofeedback check:

http://www.ncbi.nlm....pubmed/21592701

http://www.ncbi.nlm....pubmed/19760238

 

a more general information about Tinnitus and remedies, confirming your cognitive therapy statement :-).

http://www.ncbi.nlm....les/PMC3648891/


Edited by Jochen, 24 June 2015 - 10:34 AM.

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#7 William Sterog

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Posted 24 June 2015 - 02:10 PM

Was your tinnitus acute or chronic?

I have chronic tinnitus since many years and nothing removes that as far as I know.

Cognitive therapy was the only thing that ever helped me deal with it.

 

Starts to be chronic in november, after a concert where the volume was insanely high. Today it hasn't gone completely yet. I found that suplements containing Bacopa make it a lot worse but ALCAR, CDP and Uncaria make it less anoying, I think.

 

I tried to cure it with Seanol from Ecklonia Cava right after the concert, since I've read that antioxidants helps a lot, and it was a disaster, I blame this supplement for the actual chronic state, never tried that for this purpose.

 

 

When I take it I feel really strange, like floating on a drug, happy and relax. Maybe de NMDA antagonist, maybe the Mao-B inhibition, I don't think placebo, I've been taking tons of supplements and no one feels like this before. It feels like a really soft cannaboid intoxication. Then I went to my guitar lessons, came back home and fall sleep.

 

Adding references to these claims:

 

Rhynchophylline is an alkaloid found in certain Uncaria species (Rubiaceae), notably Uncaria rhynchophylla[1] and Uncaria tomentosa.[2] It is a non-competitive NMDA antagonist (IC50 = 43.2 microM) and calcium channel blocker.[3][4] It also occurs naturally in the leaves of the Mitragyna speciosa (Kratom) tree (also a Rubiaceae), native to Thailand.[5]

 

Rhynchophylline and isorhynchophylline inhibit NMDA receptors expressed in Xenopus oocytes.

 

https://www.ncbi.nlm...pubmed/12433591

 

 

Rhynchophylline and isorhynchophylline are major tetracyclic oxindole alkaloid components of Uncaira species, which have been long used as medicinal plants. In this study, the effects of rhynchophylline and isorhynchophylline on the ionotropic and metabotropic glutamate receptor-mediated current responses were examined using Xenopus oocytes injected with total RNA prepared from rat cortices or cerebelli. Rhynchophylline and isorhynchophylline (1-100 microM) per se failed to induce membrane current, but these alkaloids reversibly reduced N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA)-induced current in a concentration-dependent but voltage-independent manner. The IC(50) values of rhynchophylline and isorhynchophylline were 43.2 and 48.3 microM, respectively. Substitution of Ba(2+) for Ca(2+) in the recording medium did not alter the extent of rhynchophylline- and isorhynchophylline-induced suppression of NMDA currents. In contrast, neither alkaloid had an effect on the currents mediated by ionotropic kainic acid-type and (+/-)-alpha-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazolepropionic acid (AMPA)-type glutamate receptors or by the metabotropic glutamate receptor(1 and 5) (mGlu(1/5)). Rhynchophylline and isorhynchophylline (30 microM) significantly reduced the maximal current responses evoked by NMDA and glycine (a co-agonist of NMDA receptor), but had no effect on the EC(50) values and Hill coefficients of NMDA and glycine for inducing currents. These alkaloids showed no interaction with the polyamine binding site, the Zn(2+) site, proton site or redox modulatory site on the NMDA receptor. These results suggest that rhynchophylline and isorhynchophylline act as noncompetitive antagonists of the NMDA receptor and that this property may contribute to the neuroprotective and anticonvulsant activity of the Uncaira species plant extracts.

 

Monoamine oxidase B (MAO-B) inhibition by active principles from Uncaria rhynchophylla.

 

http://www.ncbi.nlm....pubmed/15890481

 

 

 

Attenuation of monoamine oxidase B (MAO-B) activity may provide protection against oxidative neurodegeneration. For this reason, inhibition of MAO-B activity is used as part of the treatment of Parkinson's and Alzheimer's patients. The hook of Uncaria rhynchophylla (Miq.) Jacks. (Rubiaceae) is a traditional Chinese herbal drug that is generally used to treat convulsive disorders. In this study, the fractionation and purification of Uncariarhynchophylla extracts using a bioguided assay isolated two known compounds, (+)-catechin and (-)-epicatechin. The compounds inhibited MAO-B, as measured by an assay of rat brain MAO-B separated by electrophoresis on a 7.5% native polyacrylamide gel. The IC(50) values of (+)-catechin and (-)-epicatechin were 88.6 and 58.9 microM, respectively, and inhibition occurred in a dose-dependent manner, as measured by the fluorescence method. The Lineweaver-Burk plot revealed K(i) values for (+)-catechin and (-)-epicatechin of 74 and 21 microM, respectively. This suggests that these two compounds, isolated here for the first time from Uncaria rhynchophylla, might be able to protect against neurodegeneration in vitro, and, therefore, the molecular mechanism deserves further study. This finding may also increase interest in the health benefits of Uncaria rhynchophylla.

 


Edited by William Sterog, 24 June 2015 - 02:20 PM.

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#8 adamh

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Posted 24 June 2015 - 06:07 PM

What dosing and strength of cats claw are you taking? I would like to get rid of my tinnitis though I doubt it will do much. I've tried many things over the years but you never know when the next thing will be good.


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#9 William Sterog

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Posted 24 June 2015 - 07:05 PM

What dosing and strength of cats claw are you taking? I would like to get rid of my tinnitis though I doubt it will do much. I've tried many things over the years but you never know when the next thing will be good.

 

Uncaria Tomentosa I used to take on 2-4 pills at day, containing 200mg (whole plant) + 60mg (unknow concentration extract) each pill.

 

Uncaria Rhynchophilla I'm taking it on a propietary blend, since is really hard to buy it alone, wich also includes Ziziphus Jujuba and Albizia Julibrissin, 3 pills makes 1800mg of the blend.

 

Another interesting herb is Polygala Tenuifolia, which is even harder to find. I have the non proved hypothesis that its hability in increasing NFG and BDNF could lead to an improvement in the symptoms of tinnitus. Also, it works like Uncaria does in many aspects:

 

A randomized, double-blindplacebo-controlled, parallel-group study of the extract of dried roots of Polygala tenuifolia in healthy adults produced memory-enhancing effects.[2] A similar trial with elderly humans also found significant cognitive improvement.[3] Another study has shown that P. tenuifoliaincreases NGF secretion in astrocytes.[4]

The root is used in Chinese medicine used for its sedative, antipsychotic, cognition improving, neuroprotective and antidepressant effect.

Preclinically, Radix Polygalae extract has been shown to demonstrate a rapid-onset antidepressant-like effect.[5] One triterpenoid saponin from the roots, Yuanzhi-1, shows significant affinity towards 5-HT, NE and DA transporters and potent antidepressant-like effects.[6]

3,6'-disinapoyl sucrose from Polygala tenuifolia significantly inhibited MAO-A and MAO-B activity, blocked stress-induced elevations of plasma cortisol,[7] improved hippocampal-dependent learning and memory [8] and rescued stress-induced deficits in hippocampal neuronal plasticity and neurogenesis [9]

Radix Polygalae extract also displays anti-inflammatory activity towards microglia [10]

 


Edited by William Sterog, 24 June 2015 - 07:15 PM.

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#10 Flex

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Posted 24 June 2015 - 09:50 PM

No its not hard to obtain. I live in germany and despite the relative restricted laws, I´m able to get it within the EU.

Search for the chinese name, called pin yin, like in google: Polygala tenuifolia pinyin

You´ll get Yuan Zhi.

 

As far as I know, are Sun Ten and Sanjiu999 brand products. this might be useful if Youre concerned, like me, of possible pollutions  (heavy metals, pesticides)

 

Here are some sources (see post #6 & #7)

What's interesting about Danhong and NGF ?

http://www.longecity...gf/#entry733023

 

Btw: got my Polygala and Uncaria extracts form http://castleblackhealth.com/

 

However they arent allways reliable in terms of sending You the brand which is shown on their page.

More infos are in the posts above.

 

I´ve ordered from the ebay user dullmeat (?) from the UK

Hier shop is also found in google

http://www.tcm4u.co....Path=Categories

 

But I have some concerns because their herbs are send in extra refilled plastic bags. I asked them about a certificate of analysis and the manufacturer but they only told me that it was Koda ltd...

I cant help but I doubt this somehow or to put it in another way: I´m sceptic

 

Would rather buy from

http://www.aliexpres...1889270237.html

 instead of TCM4U if the customs werent that problematic


Edited by Flex, 24 June 2015 - 10:00 PM.

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#11 dinodeus

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Posted 25 June 2015 - 09:13 PM

Nice, thank you for sharing! I'll give this a try as well


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#12 The Beauty of Peace

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Posted 12 January 2016 - 06:50 PM

Was anyone else able to get rid of tinnitus with  Cat's Claw?



#13 William Sterog

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Posted 03 February 2016 - 08:30 AM

Was anyone else able to get rid of tinnitus with  Cat's Claw?

No, but Uncaria makes it less anoying. Also, I found it (rhynchophylla) extremely mood lifting, seems weird to me being unable to find any study supporting this antidepressant properties.

 

Another anecdotal side effect on me is that, if I take it right before going to sleep, I will experiment lucid dreaming for sure.


Edited by William Sterog, 03 February 2016 - 08:41 AM.


#14 William Sterog

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Posted 11 March 2016 - 03:14 PM

I wrote this in another topic, and I think that is interesting and adds some new information about Uncaria, especially for those who are interested on its lucid dreaming effect.

 

 

 

 

 

First of all, we are going to try to understand some of the basics mechanics of dreaming.

 

During a full eight-hour night sleep, most dreams occur in the typical two hours of REM.

http://science.howst...rain/dream2.htm

 

The release from aminergic inhibition stimulates cholinergic reticular neurons in the brainstem and switches the sleeping brain into the highly active REM state, in which acetylcholine levels are as high as in the waking state. 5-HT and NE, on the other hand, are virtually absent during REM.

http://www.ncbi.nlm....cles/PMC534695/

 

 

So ok, you dream during the REM phase, when your brain is loaded with high levels of acetylcholine and low levels of serotonin and norepinephrine.

 

 

Inhibition of 5HT reuptake occurs with SSRIs, SNRIs, tricyclic antidepressants, and the antidepressant trazodone and would be expected to promote wakefulness by increasing the binding to 5HT1 and 5HT2 receptors. By increasing binding to 5HT1 receptors, an increase in wakefulness may occur in association with suppression of REM sleep.

 

http://www.ncbi.nlm....les/PMC3076958/

 

Dopamine reuptake inhibition would be expected to have wake promoting effects.

http://www.ncbi.nlm....les/PMC3076958/

 

 

As a result, medications which inhibit this enzyme, monoamine oxidase inhibitors (MAOI), increase the available amount of NE, 5HT, epinephrine, and DA, and, much like agents which inhibit the reuptake of these neurotransmitters, MAOI may have some degree of wake promoting effects.

http://www.ncbi.nlm....les/PMC3076958/

 

Among antidepressant and antipsychotic agents, suppression of REM sleep appears to primarily derive from blockade of Ach receptors (occurs primarily with TCAs and a number of the antipsychotic agents) and increasing 5HT binding to 5HT1A receptors, which occurs with TCAs, MAOIs, SSRIs, and SNRIs.

http://www.ncbi.nlm....les/PMC3076958/

 

So, high levels of serotonin and dopamine seems to promote wakefulness and supress REM sleep. 

 

Well, now we should look again at the compounds that I mentioned in my first post:

 

- Uncaria Rhynchophylla

 

Monoamine oxidase B (MAO-B) inhibition by active principles from Uncaria rhynchophylla.

http://www.ncbi.nlm....pubmed/15890481

 

Geissoschizine methyl ether, an alkaloid from the Uncaria hook has third-generation antipsychotic-like actions at the dopamine and serotonin receptors.

http://www.ncbi.nlm....pubmed/21951966

 

Rhynchophylline and isorhynchophylline inhibit NMDA receptors expressed in Xenopus oocytes.

https://www.ncbi.nlm...pubmed/12433591

 

 

 

- Ziziphus Jujuba

 

Dopamine and serotonin activity:

Interactions were demonstrated with the adenosine A(1) receptor, dopamine transporter and dopamine D(5) receptor (antagonist activity), serotonin receptors (5-HT(1B) and 5-HT(6) antagonist activity) and the GABA benzodiazepine receptor at a concentration of 100 microg/ml or lower. these results suggested that the hypnotic effect of jujubosides on normal rats may be influenced by circadian rhythm and the serotonergic system may involve in the hypnotic effect of jujubosides. Jujubosides may be good source of lead compounds for novel hypnotics.

 

NMDA inhibition.

http://www.ncbi.nlm....pt=AbstractPlus

 

- Albizia Julibrisin

 

The present study was undertaken to investigate the antidepressant-like effects of the methylene chloride fraction of Albizzia julibrissin (MCAJ) using a tail suspension test in mice. MCAJ was orally administered at 50, 100, or 200 mg/kg to mice, 1 h before the tail suspension test. Acute treatment with MCAJ at 200 mg/kg significantly reduced the immobility time compared with the control group, and thus showed an antidepressant-like effect. This effect was comparable to that of imipramine at 10 mg/kg. This antidepressant-like effect was reversed by treatment with WAY-100635 (a 5-HT1A receptor antagonist) or pindolol (a 5-HT1A/1B receptor antagonist). However, the antidepressant effect of MCAJ was not effected by treatment with GR55562 (a 5-HT1B receptor antagonist) or ketanserin (a 5-HT2A receptor antagonist). Therefore, our findings suggest that MCAJ exerts its antidepressant-like effect via the 5-HT1A receptor system.

 

 

So, we know that dopamine and serotonin plays a mayor role in wakefulness, and they supress REM phase in some way. Also, our three herbs interact with this sistems. 

 

Uncaria works like the antipsychotic medication Aripiprazole.

 

 

When looking at the level of the receptors, geissoschizine methyl ether is a potent agonist of the 5-HT1A receptors while it is inhibitory at the 5-HT2A, 5-HT2C, and 5-HT7 receptors at the same concentration range, with the possibility of being a partial agonist at higher doses. This profile is very similar to the anti-psychotic drug Aripiprazole.

 http://www.ncbi.nlm....pubmed/21951966 .

 

Does Aripiprazole interfere with dreaming?

 

105 reported cases of abnormal dreams while using Aripiprazole.

https://www.druginfo...mal dreams.html

 

Some anecdotal testimonies of antipsychotics causing lucid dreaming.

https://drugs-forum....ad.php?t=240904

 

Uncaria and Jujuba shows NMDA inhibition like we show before.

 

Does NDMA inhibitor interfere with dreaming?

 

Ketamine acts primarily as an antagonist of the NMDA receptor, and this action accounts for most of its effects.

http://journals.lww...._Tricks.39.aspx

 

Ketamine's other measurable effects on the body include rapid-eye movements, salivation, and the production of brainwave activity mimicking that of a dream state. So. if you look at the facts, you'll see what we have here is a safe, highly effective, and extremely repeatable means of inducing a lucid dream state at will. When administered in the correct dose, Ketamine is a lucid dream enabler (LDE). 

 

How I think this suplement works on inducing lucind dreaming?

 

I think the main responsable is Uncaria Rhynchophylla because of:

 

-His MAO-B inhibition. 

(+)-catechin and (-)-epicatechin inhibit the degradation of dopamine during the REM phase.

 

-His 5-HT regulation.
Geissoschizine methyl ether modulates the amount of serotonin in the brain during the REM phase.

 

-His NMDA inhibition.

I don't know why yet, but it seems to be a link between NMDA and lucid dreaming.

 

My hypothesis is that the brain shut down the consciousness lowering the levels of dopamine and serotonin during the dreaming phase. Uncaria doesn't alow to do that, keeping your mind awake even when you are sleeping, and causing lucid dreaming.

 

On topic: Would galantamine work as well? 

 

-Galantamine enhances dopaminergic neurotransmission in vivo via allosteric potentiation of nicotinic acetylcholine receptors.

http://www.ncbi.nlm....pubmed/16641937

 

-On the basis of the studies reviewed, galantamine does not appear to affect serotonin (5-HT) release in the brain.

http://www.life-enha...nsmitter-spiral

 

-Noradrenaline is the brain’s version of adrenaline. In another in vivo microdialysis study, it was shown that galantamine with nicotine given at ineffective doses increased noradrenaline release, although galantamine (3 mg/kg) alone did not affect the release in the hippocampus of rats.

http://www.life-enha...nsmitter-spiral

 

-Galantamine seems to potentiate of NMDA receptors.

http://www.ncbi.nlm....pubmed/15121761

 

In conclusion, if our hypothesis is right, galantamine doesn't see like the best way to induce lucid dreaming. Galantamine increases the acetylcholine, which is already elevated during dreaming, but Uncaria also acts increasing the acetylcholine in the brain:

 

Geissoschizine methyl ether, a corynanthean-type indole alkaloid from Uncaria rhynchophylla as a potential acetylcholinesterase inhibitor.

http://www.ncbi.nlm....pubmed/21714741

 

So, while Galantamine acts on dopamine an acetylcholine, Uncaria acts on Acetylcholine, Serotonin, Dopamine and MNDA inhibition, all of them seems related with lucid dreaming. Uncaria seems to be a superior option for lucid dreaming and maybe even for brain health proposes:

 

Isorhynchophylline treatment improves the amyloid-β-induced cognitive impairment in rats via inhibition of neuronal apoptosis and tau protein hyperphosphorylation.

http://www.ncbi.nlm....pubmed/24164737

 

Neuroprotective effects of rhynchophylline against ischemic brain injury via regulation of the Akt/mTOR and TLRs signaling pathways.

http://www.ncbi.nlm....pubmed/25079660

 

Geissoschizine methyl ether, an alkaloid from the Uncaria hook, improves remyelination after cuprizone-induced demyelination in medial prefrontal cortex of adult mice.

http://www.ncbi.nlm....pubmed/24190599

 

Effects of the hook of Uncaria rhynchophylla on neurotoxicity in the 6-hydroxydopamine model of Parkinson's disease.

http://www.ncbi.nlm....pubmed/21714741

 

Anticonvulsant effect of Uncaria rhynchophylla (Miq) Jack. in rats with kainic acid-induced epileptic seizure.

http://www.ncbi.nlm....pubmed/10467459

 

Uncaria rhynchophylla, a Chinese medicinal herb, has potent antiaggregation effects on Alzheimer's beta-amyloid proteins.

http://www.ncbi.nlm....pubmed/16676329

 

 

And for overall health:

 

Uncarinic Acid C Isolated from Uncaria rhynchophylla Induces Differentiation of Th1-Promoting Dendritic Cells Through TLR4 Signaling.

http://www.ncbi.nlm....pubmed/21499439

 

Inhibition of phospholipase cgamma1 and cancer cell proliferation by triterpene esters from Uncaria rhynchophylla.

http://www.ncbi.nlm....pubmed/10869194

 

Please, let me know if I need some more references. Thanks. Also, excuse my english, is not my main language.

 

PD: I do not sell Uncaria or any other thing. I just get pissed off with the votes. And yes, Uncaria is one of my favorites herbs, extremely underrated though. 

 

 

 



#15 William Sterog

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Posted 02 October 2016 - 07:17 AM

Something weird happened last night, some time ago I lost my faith in Uncaria because, despite the initial improvement, it didn't cure my tinnitus on the long term. Well, now I'm fighting a resistant fungus infection, I've tried everything and the remission is very slow, so I ended up taking some Uncaria I have left because, as you know, it is a potent stimulant of the inmune system.

 

So I woke up in the middle of the night and I heard the silence, absolute silence, my tinnitus has dissapeared, gone. Now is here again, but for the first time in years I have a total break from it. 

 

Something in the Uncaria really works, but it is or too weak, or just a relief and not a cure. 



#16 PeaceAndProsperity

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Posted 02 October 2016 - 03:25 PM

Can confirm that melatonin (<3mg) works most of the time for noise-induced chronic (10+ years) tinnitus.



#17 William Sterog

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Posted 02 October 2016 - 04:24 PM

Can confirm that melatonin (<3mg) works most of the time for noise-induced chronic (10+ years) tinnitus.

 

I take melatonin every night, I don't think that it reduces tinnitus, only make it less annoying facilitating sleep.


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#18 PeaceAndProsperity

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Posted 02 October 2016 - 07:02 PM

 

Can confirm that melatonin (<3mg) works most of the time for noise-induced chronic (10+ years) tinnitus.

 

I take melatonin every night, I don't think that it reduces tinnitus, only make it less annoying facilitating sleep.

 

https://www.ncbi.nlm...pubmed/21859051

https://www.ncbi.nlm...pubmed/24945170

https://www.ncbi.nlm...pubmed/16455366

https://www.ncbi.nlm...pubmed/20207491

It definitely does something more than just hiding the tinnitus but it's in a weird way and clearly only works for some. For a few seconds the tinnitus goes away and slightly comes back and goes away and etc., but only on some days. On other days it can provide a long lasting relief. So it's not that effective for me but definitely an option.



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#19 Baten

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Posted 03 October 2016 - 11:58 AM

I bought cat's claw extract (Now brand) and did nothing for my chronic tinnitus (not noise induced, cause unknown).

Melatonin does nothing for it either, in any case.

 

In my case zinc dampens it a bit, as well as GABA or GABA-related supplements, as well as corticosteroids.

I have never had a moment of 'absolute silence' though, even with these aids. Not since I was 18 :/...


Edited by Baten, 03 October 2016 - 11:59 AM.






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