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Nicotinamide Riboside [Curated]

nicotinamide riboside nicotinamide nad boosting charles brenner david sinclair leonard guarente niagen niacinamide nicotinamide mononucleotide

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#1801 Journey2016

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Posted 23 February 2017 - 07:55 AM

Nasal arrived today, in chilled bags with instructions (sorry this site never lets me upload photos!)

But im told told to keep in fridge and once a few hours before bed in each nostril . I asked about using in the morning like some other products are used such as RG3. But im told NAD makes people tired after use so best at the end of the day.

Hopping for some good results, hopping this is a halfway treatment between heavy NR dosein and IV NAD+ treatment .

#1802 Nate-2004

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Posted 23 February 2017 - 04:37 PM

Time magazine has a feature on anti-aging in the recent edition and NR and Elysium get a small section.

 

[SNIP]
Studies have shown that supplementing with the compound extends life in mice, but whether it increases human longevity is unknown. To find out if it does--and to request FDA approval for the pill's clearance as a drug--long, rigorous clinical trials would need to be done. Instead, Elysium Health has released Basis as a supplement. That prevents the company from making specific medical claims about the pills--something that's prohibited by law in the marketing of supplements.
 
"I think the pathway Guarente is targeting is interesting"--meaning the idea that increasing NAD+ may also slow aging--"but clinical evidence is crucial," says Dr. Nir Barzilai, a researcher at Albert Einstein College of Medicine, who also studies drugs for aging.
Other scientists question the supplement approach altogether. "There is no evidence whatsoever that [Basis] produces health benefits in humans," says Dr. Jeffrey Flier, former dean of Harvard Medical School. "Many molecules that have some apparent benefits in mice or other organisms have no benefit when studied in humans."
.
The company has seven Nobel Prize--winning scientists on its advisory board, a fact that has also raised some eyebrows. Flier cautions that the company's association with lauded researchers cannot replace the science required to prove that the supplements combat aging and are safe to use.
 
THE BOTTOM LINE: It's too early to tell whether supplements can have any life-extending effects in humans.

 

UGH, it really exasperates me when people lump things into this category called "supplements" and then throw the baby out with the bathwater. It's closed minded, not at all scientific and arrogantly cynical. For one thing, NR is not technically a "supplement". For another, just because a company sells something on the open accessible market rather than hiding it by a protectionist, guild system of doctors and prescriptions, is completely irrelevant to its ability to provide benefit or function as stated. 

 

Here's the logic of guys like Dr. Jeffrey Flier: Supplements don't work > NR is sold as a supplement > Therefore it won't work.

 

Also he states that there is no evidence that it produces health benefits in humans. I'm pretty sure there is *some* evidence, I've seen a number of study results posted in this thread that say otherwise. Perhaps it's not anywhere as robust and established as it ideally could be, yet, but to say there is *no* evidence is to be a cynical denier.


Edited by Michael, 23 February 2017 - 06:49 PM.

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#1803 Journey2016

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Posted 23 February 2017 - 06:42 PM

Not sure is photo is attached to this post but this is the item i recived today

#1804 Michael

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Posted 23 February 2017 - 07:51 PM

 

To be clear, though: you're not aware of any actual science supporting that nasal or i.v. NAD+ works at all, let alone better than oral NR, yes? This is all the claims of the producer and some largely anonymous testimonials — right? As has already been pointed out, most studies indicate that NAD+ is degraded into NMN and thence NR before it is taken up by cells.


Yes NAD+ is degraded into NR and NR is taken in and converted to NMN and then to NAD+. ... It will be converted to NR at the cell membrane. To me what's the point of using a more expensive alternative, right? The biggest NAD precursor molecule to get thru the cell membrane is NR, anything bigger gets reduced.

(FWIW, it's not just NAD+'s size, but also its phosphorylation, which is generally thought to exclude all pyridine nucleotides from the cell and also keeps NMN out before dephosphorylation to NR).
 

Second, a friend has started to take 250 mg of a chewable NR tablet. He had been taking NAD sublingually until I convinced him to switch to NR. Is there evidence that chewable tablets of 250 mg of NR raises NAD more than capsules?


None at all AFAIK, and no plausible reason to think so.
 

Stability analyses showed that when Niagen was dissolved in water, NR was stable up to 6 h at room temperature and 7 days at 2–8 C. If you mix NR with water it isn't going to last very long, you can read the link.


Again, these people are evidently hawking IV NAD+ proper, not NR. IAC, FWIW, there's evidence that NR isn't quite that labile (which is not to say that I think there's any value whatsoever in these liquid products). Brenner reports that NR is largely stable for 8 h in water at pH 7, and several studies have reported positive effects administering NR in mice via the drinking water when kept in foil-covered bottles and changed every week or every 2-3 days.
 
That said, I'd be surprised if some compounding pharmacy were making a genuinely shelf-stable nasal or IV product, and would think it foolish to use such without evidence of stability – and, more importantly, at a minimum, that it has some pharmacokinetic improvement over (cheaper, more convenient, and in the case of IV, less risky) oral pills.

 

hazy said: sign me up for the nasal spray products, either NR or straight NAD, keep updates and share sources :)
 
I think you should sign up for a class in critical thinking ...
 
Journey 2016 said: As i say ive been told from clinics that offer iv nad treatments that the nasal version is new and is giving much better results than oral NR, i will update you when ive tested it out this week.
 
OK, you've been told that — but again, zero actual evidence to back it up, yes? Again: This is all medical anecdotes from parties with a vested interest in the stuff, correct? As has already been pointed out, most studies indicate that NAD+ is degraded into NMN and thence NR before it is taken up by cells.
 
Nate 2004 said: UGH, it really exasperates me when people lump things into this category called "supplements" and then throw the baby out with the bathwater. ...

Here's the logic of guys like Dr. Jeffrey Flier: Supplements don't work > NR is sold as a supplement > Therefore it won't work.

 
He never says or implies anything remotely approximating that:

"There is no evidence whatsoever that [Basis] produces health benefits in humans," says Dr. Jeffrey Flier ... "Many molecules that have some apparent benefits in mice or other organisms have no benefit when studied in humans."

The company has seven Nobel Prize--winning scientists on its advisory board, a fact that has also raised some eyebrows. Flier cautions that the company's association with lauded researchers cannot replace the science required to prove that the supplements combat aging and are safe to use.

 
He doesn't even say it doesn't work: just that there's no evidence it produces benefits in humans, which is true. (No, "it raises NAD+ in the blood" is not a health benefit). So far, there's evidence of benefit in mice, including a lot of studies in mice with a variety of mutations affecting bioenergetics — many of them with strains of C57Bl/6 mice carrying the Nnt mutation. I'm now quite unclear if there is any evidence of it producing benefits in mice or other mammals without such mutations. That might explain, for instance, why "The NAD+ precursor nicotinamide riboside decreases exercise performance in rats," even though it's been reported to improve exercise performance mice in a couple of mouse studies – at least one of those being the Canto and Auwerx study, which used (obese, diabetic) mice bearing the Nnt mutation.

Nate 2004 said: Also he states that there is no evidence that it produces health benefits in humans. I'm pretty sure there is *some* evidence, I've seen a number of study results posted in this thread that say otherwise. Perhaps it's not anywhere as robust and established as it ideally could be, yet, but to say there is *no* evidence is to be a cynical denier.
 
I'm not aware of any evidence showing human health benefits whatsoever. Can
 
Nate 2004 said: NR is not technically a "supplement".
 
Sure it is: it's more clearly a dietary supplement than (say) nearly all herbal extracts. The term as coined by the Dietary Supplement Health and Education Act refers to "a product (other than tobacco) intended to supplement the diet that bears or contains one or more of the following dietary ingredients: (A) a vitamin; (B) a mineral; © an herb or other botanical; (D) an amino acid; (E) a dietary substance for use by man to supplement the diet by increasing the total dietary intake; or (F) a concentrate, metabolite, constituent, extract, or combination of any [of the above]".

A dietary supplement is just that: a supplementary quantum of some molecule found in the diet, just like food stamps are a "supplementary nutrition" program and the EITC is a "supplementary income" program. You get some B12 in the diet; you supplement this dietary B12 with B12 in a pill, so B12 pills are dietary supplements. There's no modafinil in the diet, so it's modafinil is not a dietary supplement, no matter what some vendors might say. NR (a) is found in the diet, and (b) is a vitamin (a form of B3, alongside niacin, niacinamide, and NMN). Pills containing NR are dietary supplements, QED.


Edited by Michael, 23 February 2017 - 07:58 PM.

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#1805 Nate-2004

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Posted 23 February 2017 - 08:00 PM

 

Sure it is: it's more clearly a dietary supplement than (say) nearly all herbal extracts. The term as coined by the Dietary Supplement Health and Education Act refers to "a product (other than tobacco) intended to supplement the diet that bears or contains one or more of the following dietary ingredients: (A) a vitamin; (B) a mineral; © an herb or other botanical; (D) an amino acid; (E) a dietary substance for use by man to supplement the diet by increasing the total dietary intake; or (F) a concentrate, metabolite, constituent, extract, or combination of any [of the above]".

A dietary supplement is just that: a supplementary quantum of some molecule found in the diet, just like food stamps are a "supplementary nutrition" program and the EITC is a "supplementary income" program. You get some B12 in the diet; you supplement this dietary B12 with B12 in a pill, so B12 pills are dietary supplements. There's no modafinil in the diet, so it's modafinil is not a dietary supplement, no matter what some vendors might say. NR (a) is found in the diet, and (b) is a vitamin (a form of B3, alongside niacin, niacinamide, and NMN). Pills containing NR are dietary supplements, QED.

 

 

 

I won't argue the other points, I'll concede on those.

 

As for "supplement" and the definition you provide, despite the fact that it's only found in milk in the smallest, minute quantities for whatever reason, it's not something that you take to "supplement" your diet. There's no such thing as an NR deficiency. Niacin deficiency sure, niacin is found in the diet, but not nicotinamide riboside deficiency in which you must *supplement* to make up for what you're not getting in a normal diet.

 

It's not found in the diet, it's not a dietary requirement, thus, it can't be a supplement. Just my interpretation.


Edited by Nate-2004, 23 February 2017 - 08:03 PM.

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#1806 bluemoon

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Posted 23 February 2017 - 09:29 PM

 

He doesn't even say it doesn't work: just that there's no evidence it produces benefits in humans, which is true. (No, "it raises NAD+ in the blood" is not a health benefit).  ....
 
I'm not aware of any evidence showing human health benefits whatsoever. Can
  

 .

 

There is a lot evidence all over the "NR Experience" thread as well as reviews on Amazon and blogs.  It is anecdotal evidence but that is absolutely evidence, and I think has been good anecdotal evidence. I hear from a friend natural weight loss of 9% when she was already thin and didn't feel "starved" as she did when she tried to lose the same 10 lbs a few years earlier. The problem is that she takes Elysium Basis at 125 mg a day so it isn't clear if NR, pterostilbine or some combination caused that. The odds that she would suddenly drop to her new lower weight by another factor are very low as she struggled to do that before.

 

I know a  generally very skeptical scientist who insists his vision improved after starting 250 mg of NR and went into detail with respect to his glasses prescription on why it is easy to tell. He also says his aging spots have greatly faded, although I never saw the "before" aging spots - just the tiny "after" ones. I get better sleep, which I'll just mention in passing since I don't need my own data point to emphasize that there is a lot of evidence that NR improves the health of many over a certain age, maybe 40 or 45. Much better evidence to help pinpoint benefits at what dose is coming from Elysium. I highly doubt NR will be a complete dud but could see maybe just modest improvement over several people.

 


Edited by bluemoon, 23 February 2017 - 09:34 PM.

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#1807 ambivalent

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Posted 23 February 2017 - 09:55 PM

 

 

He doesn't even say it doesn't work: just that there's no evidence it produces benefits in humans, which is true. (No, "it raises NAD+ in the blood" is not a health benefit).  ....
 
I'm not aware of any evidence showing human health benefits whatsoever. Can
  

 .

 

There is a lot evidence all over the "NR Experience" thread as well as reviews on Amazon and blogs.  It is anecdotal evidence but that is absolutely evidence, and I think has been good anecdotal evidence.

 

 

Absolutely right. The goal of measuring, whatever form it takes, clinical trials or anecdotal accounts, is to reduce uncertainty: anecdotes play a vital role on this, especially for those, as found on here, who are out on the frontier.  


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#1808 sthira

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Posted 23 February 2017 - 10:01 PM

...Depending on how many studies relied on a substrain of C57BL/6 with the same defective Nnt gene as in Canto et al, that may mean that an awful lot of the NR literature is corrupted by an experimental artifact ... for instance, in the muscle stem cell and lifespan study in Science, the initial muscle stem cell study used the C57BL/10SnJ substrain, which does not appear to carry the mutation — but they also used the Nnt-mutant C57BL/6JRj substrain both for the followup study on mitochondrial function and stem cell aging, and also for the lifespan study, and possibly for other parts that are not explicitly spelled out ...

EDIT: Yup: the original Sinclair study on NMN restoring more youthful muscle bioenergetics in aging mice also used C57Bl/6J ...



Lovely.



...There's no such thing as an NR deficiency. Niacin deficiency sure, niacin is found in the diet, but not nicotinamide riboside deficiency in which you must *supplement* to make up for what you're not getting in a normal diet.


Did they create a deficiency in order to satisfy a deficiency? See:


Basically, they provided NR as the sole source of vitamin B3 (along with the mouse "RDA" of tryptophan...http://onlinelibrary....201600878/full


I have to admit upon looking at my own flawed, human critical thinking skills that one factor that in part sold me on independent products of NR+pterostilbene is the argumentum ad verecundiam here:


...The company has seven Nobel Prize--winning scientists on its advisory board, a fact that has also raised some eyebrows. Flier cautions that the company's association with lauded researchers cannot replace the science required to prove that the supplements combat aging and are safe to use.


So, one of the public service messages delivered in this thread is:

...([That presumably NR] raises NAD+ in the blood" is not a health benefit). So far, there's evidence of benefit in mice, including a lot of studies in mice with a variety of mutations affecting bioenergetics — many of them with strains of C57Bl/6 mice carrying the Nnt mutation...


#1809 Oakman

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Posted 23 February 2017 - 11:08 PM

I'd have to say sthira is most correct here. Just look at Chromadex's Niagen Data Sheet. If there were some notable human trials of anything and NR, they'd likely be noted by Chromadex. They aren't.

 

If you read the sheet carefully, there are three studies noted and they footnote them as follows: 1 Demonstrated in an in-vitro study. 2 Demonstrated in animal in-vitro studies. 3 Demonstrated in an in-vivo mouse study.

 

Which is not to say NR doesn't have (positive) results when taken by humans. Possibly it might. But studies to 'prove' anything other than in humans NR causes elevated NAD+ blood levels, are missing or currently on-going. Add in N=1 studies done anecdotally by all of us NR users. But ultimately, it will be some time before, and if, anything can be done to give conclusive proof one way or the other.

 

The rest of everything is marketing combined with people's desires for longevity, based on some reasonable assumptions given what we know about NR at this early point in time. 

 

Just like politics and religion, everyone has an opinion.



#1810 bluemoon

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Posted 24 February 2017 - 02:36 AM

 

The rest of everything is marketing combined with people's desires for longevity, based on some reasonable assumptions given what we know about NR at this early point in time. 

 

Just like politics and religion, everyone has an opinion.

 

Screw longevity. How do you explain all the anecdotes out there?

 

How did my 5' 3" friend go from 120lbs to 110lbs effortlessly with NR and pterostilbine at half what Elysium recommends when she struggled to do that with diet and exercise alone a few years earlier? I suspect it was pterostilbine that did that but of course I don't know.

 

I can't explain that at 250 mg of just NR I sleep like a log and wake up alert.  Nor can I explain having vivid dreams every night. They annoyed me at first but now used to them. There are *way* too many anecdotes out there to suggest nothing is going on. 

 

I am all for skepticism, but we are now all well aware of Michael's extreme anti-supplement bias, right? 


Edited by bluemoon, 24 February 2017 - 02:41 AM.

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#1811 bluemoon

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Posted 24 February 2017 - 02:53 AM

I'd have to say sthira is most correct here. Just look at Chromadex's Niagen Data Sheet. If there were some notable human trials of anything and NR, they'd likely be noted by Chromadex. They aren't. 

 

 

 

When I went to listen to Charles Brenner in December, he said that Chromadex also has a 100+ human NR trial to be released/published, but he didn't say when that data would be available. The details of the study are online.

 

 


Edited by bluemoon, 24 February 2017 - 02:53 AM.


#1812 bluemoon

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Posted 24 February 2017 - 03:03 AM

 



I have to admit upon looking at my own flawed, human critical thinking skills that one factor that in part sold me on independent products of NR+pterostilbene is the argumentum ad verecundiam here:

 


...The company has seven Nobel Prize--winning scientists on its advisory board, a fact that has also raised some eyebrows. Flier cautions that the company's association with lauded researchers cannot replace the science required to prove that the supplements combat aging and are safe to use.

 

 

For the slow (please do try to keep up)  - No, having seven Nobel Laureates backing NR with pterostilbine does not mean they are correct that it improves various aspects of health until they can demonstrate it in a controlled study, but they at Elysium have collected data in a  controlled double blind study of 120 healthy 60 to 80 year olds and are in the process of publishing the results.


Edited by bluemoon, 24 February 2017 - 03:05 AM.

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#1813 Andrews

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Posted 24 February 2017 - 09:02 AM

Can I take PQQ 20mg and Nicotinamide riboside 250mg together? In the same day.



#1814 midas

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Posted 24 February 2017 - 01:23 PM

Study Published in PAIN Reveals Nicotinamide Riboside is an Effective Tool in Relieving Chemotherapy-Induced Peripheral Neuropathy Induced by a Common Anticancer Agent

 

http://www.nasdaq.co...-20170222-00305

 

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

A Letter from the ChromaDex Chief Executive Officer

 

 

https://globenewswir...ve-Officer.html

 

http://aboutnr.com/


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#1815 Harkijn

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Posted 24 February 2017 - 02:45 PM

Thanks for sharing Midas.

 

About AboutNR.com : I kindly ask all of us to carefully read it before posting anything.... :mellow:



#1816 Bryan_S

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Posted 28 February 2017 - 10:50 PM

Vitamin B3 modulates mitochondrial vulnerability and prevents glaucoma in aged mice

http://science.scien...riant=full-text

Abstract

Glaucomas are neurodegenerative diseases that cause vision loss, especially in the elderly. The mechanisms initiating glaucoma and driving neuronal vulnerability during normal aging are unknown. Studying glaucoma-prone mice, we show that mitochondrial abnormalities are an early driver of neuronal dysfunction, occurring before detectable degeneration. Retinal levels of nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD+, a key molecule in energy and redox metabolism) decrease with age and render aging neurons vulnerable to disease-related insults. Oral administration of the NAD+ precursor nicotinamide (vitamin B3), and/or gene therapy (driving expression of Nmnat1, a key NAD+-producing enzyme), was protective both prophylactically and as an intervention. At the highest dose tested, 93% of eyes did not develop glaucoma. This supports therapeutic use of vitamin B3 in glaucoma and potentially other age-related neurodegenerations.
 
Missed this one maybe some posted it already.

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#1817 Harkijn

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Posted 09 March 2017 - 04:58 PM

I know that many readers and posters here avoid  the aggravations of reading the NR personal experiences thread . That's why I log here a video posted there today, of interest but because it visually represents what most of us are mulling over.

http://www.abc.net.a...ies/4485468.htm


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#1818 Nate-2004

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Posted 09 March 2017 - 07:33 PM

Yeah I unsubscribed from the personal experiences thread, it is always aggravating watching people talk of their unmet high expectations.

 

Fasting is just impossible for me. I can't sleep or maintain focus when I'm hungry. I know some people experience the opposite, but not eating is probably one of the most miserable experiences there are, that and solitary confinement.

 

That's why I take NR to begin with, it's a mimetic.

 

 


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#1819 MikeDC

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Posted 12 March 2017 - 06:55 PM

Could someone repost the presentation by Charles Brenner where he
Compared mTore1 and sirt1 activation?
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#1820 MikeDC

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Posted 18 March 2017 - 01:04 AM

The business of fasting.

https://www.fastcomp...ness-of-fasting
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#1821 sthira

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Posted 18 March 2017 - 03:13 AM

The business of fasting.

https://www.fastcomp...ness-of-fasting



“Fasting is perfectly safe, whereas I always have concerns about taking a drug,” he [Mark Mattson] says. “The thing with fasting is that nobody makes any money off it. That’s why you have companies [saying] they can mimic some or all of the beneficial effects of fasting.”
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#1822 soulprogrammer

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Posted 18 March 2017 - 05:06 AM

“Fasting is perfectly safe, whereas I always have concerns about taking a drug,” 

 

I done fasting before, I love it! It make me feel really really good. I definitely encourage people to try fasting. However, saying that fasting is "perfectly" safe I think is very irresponsible. Fasting is not "perfectly" safe especially for those who are sick or have medical issue. Fasting is generally safe for those who are healthy.  Drug of course is man made, anything man made is toxic to a certain degree.


Edited by soulprogrammer, 18 March 2017 - 05:08 AM.

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#1823 Harkijn

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Posted 18 March 2017 - 10:48 AM

I know that many readers and posters here avoid  the aggravations of reading the NR personal experiences thread . That's why I log here a video posted there today, of interest but because it visually represents what most of us are mulling over.

http://www.abc.net.a...ies/4485468.htm

Unintentionally I derailed this thread by linking to this video. It is true that most of it is about fasting, an important and fascinating subject, but my focus was on the visual presentation of NADprecursor research.

So I propose that in this thread we redirect the discussion to NR.



#1824 Bryan_S

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Posted 18 March 2017 - 03:47 PM

Unintentionally I derailed this thread by linking to this video. It is true that most of it is about fasting, an important and fascinating subject, but my focus was on the visual presentation of NADprecursor research.

 

 

So I propose that in this thread we redirect the discussion to NR.

 

 

As long as you stay true to discussion on NAD precursors and related NAD boosting I won't have a problem. See http://www.longecity...-curated/page-1

 

The research is the main focus here. 


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#1825 Michael

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Posted 18 March 2017 - 06:37 PM

 

Unintentionally I derailed this thread by linking to this video. It is true that most of it is about fasting, an important and fascinating subject, but my focus was on the visual presentation of NADprecursor research.

 

So I propose that in this thread we redirect the discussion to NR.

 

As long as you stay true to discussion on NAD precursors and related NAD boosting I won't have a problem. See http://www.longecity...-curated/page-1

 

The research is the main focus here.

 

It's ultimately your thread to rule, Bryan, but I'd say that fasting is only rather tangentially related to NR and related subjects, and in the section of the Catalyst video actually focused on fasting, the effects of fasting on NAD are not actually explored.

 

Harkjin, the video is available on YouTube, and as you may know they are set up to let one cue up a video at a particular time point. If you'd like, I could go back to your post and replace the existing ABC page version of the video with the same documentary cued up to the beginning of the NMN discussion on YouTube (NB that it is NMN they're talking about, not NR). LMK.
 



#1826 Harkijn

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Posted 18 March 2017 - 06:59 PM

Harkjin, the video is available on YouTube, and as you may know they are set up to let one cue up a video at a particular time point. If you'd like, I could go back to your post and replace the existing ABC page version of the video with the same documentary cued up to the beginning of the NMN discussion on YouTube (NB that it is NMN they're talking about, not NR). LMK.

 

Hi Michael, thanks very much, I really appreciate your effort, but I think it won't be necessary to edit anything. I just wanted to send out a gentle reminder to the regular posters that we shouldn't stray too far from the central theme. I kinda trust they will agree. ;)

 

 

 

 

 



#1827 soulprogrammer

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Posted 20 March 2017 - 03:00 PM

Is this old news?

 

Nicotinamide riboside or IL-17A signaling blockers to prevent liver disorders Ana Teijeiro and Nabil Djouder

 

dated Jan 2017

 

http://www.impactjou...s/1/338/338.pdf


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#1828 MikeDC

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Posted 20 March 2017 - 11:58 PM

This is new. Although there was an earlier publication that showed Nicotinamide Riboside prevented and cures liver and other cancers.

#1829 Bryan_S

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Posted 21 March 2017 - 01:10 AM

Edited Transcript of CDXC earnings conference call or presentation 17-Mar-17 5:00pm GMT

http://finance.yahoo...-194054556.html


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#1830 Kirito

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Posted 23 March 2017 - 10:01 PM

Critical step in DNA repair, cellular aging pinpointed

"experiments conducted in mice show that treatment with the NAD precursor NMN mitigates age-related DNA damage and wards off DNA damage from radiation exposure."

 

https://www.scienced...70323150518.htm

 

 


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Also tagged with one or more of these keywords: nicotinamide riboside, nicotinamide, nad boosting, charles brenner, david sinclair, leonard guarente, niagen, niacinamide, nicotinamide mononucleotide

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