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DNA Methylation Analysis

osiris green aging biomarkers dna methylation

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#1 Mind

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Posted 23 January 2017 - 10:57 PM


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#2 Mind

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Posted 23 January 2017 - 11:05 PM

For Immortality Institute  Members:

Osiris Green is offering a 30% discount. You can find the discount code here: http://www.longecity...ember-discount/

 

 

osirisgreen2.png


Edited by caliban, 24 January 2017 - 02:13 AM.
name & pic


#3 neilcopes

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Posted 24 January 2017 - 10:04 PM

Hi, I’m Dr. Neil Copes, CEO of Osiris Green.  The service that we’re offering is a mail-in saliva testing service that can give an estimate of your chronological age based on observed epigenetic changes in your DNA.  I am very interested in the life extension community and I’m hoping that this service might be as a useful tool for people who want to monitor their age from an epigenetic standpoint.  The FAQ page on our website is a useful place to start if you’re interested.  Also, I recently gave an interview at FightAging.org that might provide some additional background on what we’re trying to do.
 
Feel free to ask me any questions, and I’ll replay as time permits.

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#4 Tom Andre F. (ex shinobi)

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Posted 29 January 2017 - 05:52 PM

Hi,

 

can you please explain deeper this topic please ? for instance, whats the difference between DNA methylation and mtDNA methylation please though aging ?

 

Is it more reliable than the telomeres lenght test ? your opinion please

 

And status of γH2AX ? wich is used as very reliable to give DNA damage status

 

Is saliva reliable to know what state are generally our others cells ?

 

And finally is it possible to directly reverse this clock biomarker ?

 

thank you !



#5 neilcopes

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Posted 13 February 2017 - 03:57 PM

Hi.  Thank you for the questions, and I apologize for the EXTREMELY long delay in responding (a combination of being out of town, along with a wicked head cold).  
 
The main difference between DNA methylation and mtDNA methylation, as far as I’m aware, is that mtDNA methylation has been much less studied.  Likely due to its low levels and higher degree of variability, mtDNA methylation wasn’t fully confirmed by the scientific community until the early 2000s.  As far as age-related methylation is concerned, I know that several mtDNA methylation sites have shown a linear correlation to chronological age (Mawlood SK, et al. 2016), but the coefficient of correlation (the tightness of the scatter in the data) was reported as lower than in other methods.
 
As far as I’m aware, epigenetic methods of chronological age determination are more accurate than telomere length measurements.  Telomere length is affected by multiple factors, including oxidative stress.  (Global DNA methylation too is affected by a huge number of environmental factors, but multiple specific DNA regions seem to be more affected by chronological age than anything else.)  As for y-H2AX, as you stated it is a very reliable marker for double-strand breaks in DNA, and the level of y-H2AX expression has been shown to increase with age until around the age of 57, when it’s increase plateaus (Schurman SH, et al. 2012).  I have not seen y-H2AX levels used as a predictor of chronological age, although I suppose it potentially could be for individuals below 60 years old. 
 
The method I’m using relies on DNA isolated from buccal cells (epithelial cells of the cheek and gums).  From my personal experience, these are more than adequate for purposes of DNA methylation analysis for estimating chronological age.  I can’t state as to how these cells in general compare to other cell types within the body, but if I had to make an educated guess I would say that they are probably fairly similar in physiology and gene expression to other epithelial cells.
 
As to your last question: is it possible to reverse this clock biomarker?  I certainly hope so.  My assumption is that most age-related DNA methylation changes are the result of random epigenetic drift (hypermethylation) and inadequate recovery of epigenetic state after DNA repair (hypomethylation).  Some of these age-related epigenetic changes though likely reflect gene regulation that is part of the general developmental inertia that occurs past puberty (there’s an excellent book by Dr. Richard Walker that discusses this topic – he doesn’t get enough attention in my opinion) as well as cellular changes happening in response to body-wide factors such as senescent cell accumulation and immune system decline.  Likely, any effective antiaging therapy would at least slow those epigenetic changes, if not reverse them entirely.

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#6 Tom Andre F. (ex shinobi)

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Posted 04 March 2017 - 05:52 PM

Hi,

 

thank you for your answer !

 

I retain this and would need more information about it please:

 

 

 


 
As far as I’m aware, epigenetic methods of chronological age determination are more accurate than telomere length measurements.  Telomere length is affected by multiple factors, including oxidative stress.  (Global DNA methylation too is affected by a huge number of environmental factors, but multiple specific DNA regions seem to be more affected by chronological age than anything else.) 

 

 

Basically you say DNA methylation a better biomarker because less influenced by external factors. However, please share more data or info about this exact sentence "multiple specific DNA regions seem to be more affected by chronological age than anything else"

 

is this though replication ? Mutation ? what protein can influence it ?

 

 



#7 neilcopes

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Posted 13 March 2017 - 01:10 PM

I suppose a more accurate way of saying it would be that for certain gene promoters the degree of methylation has an exceptionally high correlation with chronological age, and the strength of this correlation is generally greater than for other biomarkers, such as telomere length.  The best paper on this subject is really the original epigenetic clock paper by Steve Horvath.


Edited by neilcopes, 13 March 2017 - 01:11 PM.


#8 Mind

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Posted 20 March 2017 - 11:09 PM

I ordered my analysis today.



#9 neilcopes

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Posted 21 March 2017 - 03:25 AM

Wonderful.  Thank you for your support.



#10 Mind

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Posted 17 April 2017 - 10:36 PM

Got my results back.

 

Maybe my lifestyle, diet, and exercise are paying some dividends.

 

Chronological age=46

 

Biological age according to DNA methylation=36 (+/- 2.6 years)

 

Anyone else get results back yet?



#11 hav

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Posted 07 May 2017 - 04:48 AM

Found this informative article on Aging and DNA Methylation, Jung & Pfeifer (2015)

 

Howard



#12 Michael

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Posted 13 June 2017 - 06:34 PM

Neil, as far as I can see from the FAQ on your website and from the below interview with Reason at FightAging!, you are only running a couple of gene promoters, not the 353 CpG sites included in the Horvath "clock" or the 71 included 71 in that by Hannum and colleagues — correct? And you've only validated it against a small number of "friends and family members,"? And you've only looked at its correlation with chronological age — unlike the Horvath or Hannum epigenetic "clocks," you have no evidence that a discordance between age as estimated by your assay and chronological age predicts any hard outcomes such as risk of age-related disease or death in the future — again, unlike the Horvath or Hannum epigenetic "clocks.

 

Right?

 

[Reason]: How did you settle on the particular combination of genes you are testing?

[Neil:] I remembered a 2011 paper from Eric Vilain's lab linking chronological age with a fairly linear trend in methylation in the promoters of a small set of genes. We did a test run using just the TOM1L1 and NPTX2 promoters, which were among the top genes in the paper and fairly easy to work with from a technical standpoint. The initial results looked good so we developed the service from there.

 

[Reason]: You are forging ahead with your own implementation of part of the Horvath approach to epigenetic age; how are you validating it?

[Neil:] We're still a fairly small operation. So far validation has consisted of getting as much saliva as we could from friends and family members, and processing the samples. We then used CpG methylation and known chronological ages to calibrate our model. So far the linear model is estimating samples with an error of 7 years standard deviation from chronological age. The idea then is to continue performing estimates on paid samples and refining the model as necessary, even providing new estimates on older samples so that users can continue to get any refinements to their existing data as time goes on.

 

 


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#13 neilcopes

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Posted 23 June 2017 - 11:58 AM

Yes, the method we are using is based on the three gene promoters with the tightest correlation to age, as outlined in the 2011 Bocklandt paper (link).  The decision to go with these three tightly-correlated gene promoters as opposed to the full 353 set, or any other set, was primarily a decision of cost.  Three genes can be examined individually with basic lab techniques.  Large sets would require a microarray approach, which would drive the price up dramatically.
 
The mathematical model that we’re using was originally based on a data set of as many friends and family members as we could get (as I said, we’re a small operation).  The data set has expanded since then.
 
As far as I’m aware, there have been no studies looking at a correlation between disease or mortality risk for these three gene promoters – unlike the Horvath or Hannum sets.  Nor are we in a position to make such an investigation ourselves.  We’re offering the service based just on what has been reported and what we have seen – as a measurement of a genetic parameter that corresponds with chronological age.

Edited by neilcopes, 23 June 2017 - 11:59 AM.

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#14 neilcopes

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Posted 29 October 2017 - 03:02 PM

By the way, we had some longer-than-expected downtime this year due to a move to a new location, renovations, and a hurricane.  We are finally open and taking a small number of orders again.  The discount code for Longecity members still applies.
 
Best regards,
Neil Copes
 






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