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Supplements/tips for brain repair during benzo withdrawal

benzo withdrawal supplements

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#31 Voulezvous

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Posted 27 March 2018 - 08:31 AM

I appreciate this a lot. I’m hanging in there pretty well actually, just going au naturel. This was my second day in a row taking only one mg of Xanax, down from 3. A few months ago I was taking 4 a day. I’m seeing my doctor later this week and I’m going to ask to switch to Ativan or Valium and keep it at a dose that I’ll have to ration.

I’ve been taking magnesium, epa omegas, other vitamins and minerals, inositol, tyrosine, and a lot of water. The depression and anxiety are bad, but honestly I don’t think it’s that much worse. I mean it is worse, but survivable. This is without any exercise. If I could make myself do that I know it would help.

I’ve taken seroquel before and hated it. It kept me up all night. I already have miserable insomnia. I tend to not respond well to things most people like. I’ve tried a lot of meds and have had bad reactions to several. This makes me even more wary of flumazenil.
*edit: I have a new prescription for Ambien. One 10 mg pill doesn’t do a thing, unfortunately, so I’ve been taking two at night for the last few days. That’s a problem.
I wish I could take seroquel.











? You seem to not be aware of what it does. No most psychiatrists don't prescribe an IV drug normally used for overdose or detox. If you had hyperinsomina you can get it prescribed.

Has far as PAWS goes it's been shown to be effective. I think it would be much more effective if taken chronically to upreg the receptors more meaningfully based on the mode of action studies. But here are some of the PAWS ones which showed it was effective and safe.


Eur J Pharmacol. 1986 Dec 2;132(1):31-8. Periodic benzodiazepine antagonist administration prevents benzodiazepine withdrawal symptoms in.
" Every third day administration of the benzodiazepine antagonist, Ro15-1788, during a similar period of continuous diazepam exposure, significantly decreases withdrawal behaviors."
" It is postulated that physical dependence reverts to a drug naive state after each exposure to the benzodiazepine antagonist. This treatment may represent a possible therapeutic approach for preventing the (time dependent) development of physical dependence and the accompanying severe withdrawal symptoms."



I am well aware of what it does. You're citing a medical journal article that was probably published before you were born. I mean, 1986? Really?

Find me something from the 21st century.

Bottom line: benzo withdrawal is not that bad. For most people who use therapeutic doses, even for years, there is no withdrawal. For abuse, not much seems to help but time.

PAWS itself appears to be an internet driven phenomenon. Benzos were brought to market not long after antibiotics. We've got 60 years of history here, and not until BenzoBuddies came out did the world start freaking out that suddenly drugs from the 1950s were the scourge of mankind.

Bottom line: my recommendation stands. Taper and tough it out first. If you can't take it, seroquel, metformin, and a beta blocker. Works like a charm. If you can't take the seroquel sides, gabapentin is the next step, but that can have withdrawal and requires more frequent dosing.

Nothing else is worth mentioning.



No you're not but maybe someday you'll realize. I cited all the research rather than offer no research and make a bias statement solely based on the year of the study rather than the data the study produced and it's validity.

Using antagonists for receptor upregulation is a sound and studied biochemical effect. It's proven to reduce symptoms of PAWS. It should be first line for all ex benzo users being superior than anything else in resolving the underlaying cause of PAWS. Receptor dysfunction induced by down-regulation and receptor reduction.



It is not that simple. And the particular antagonist you describe requires IV administration non-stop for the effect you propose to work. Thus, the suggestion that it could be esterized somehow and a depot injectable product created.

And come on - how many opioid addicts require opioid antagonists? We barely understand how these drugs work. In the vast majority of cases, with almost every single drug, the only solution is time. Whether you're dealing with a cocaine addict, someone coming off of anabolic steroids, a heroin addict. There are drugs that help, but they usually are just a crutch at best. There is no magic cure all for any drug to which your body adapts. The only solution is time.

And to the fellow with the problem I responded to before - I did not see you were from Dubai. If you have speaking Arabic for a long time, my harsh tone is understandably disturbing. I do apologize. But, I saw the xanax comment.

First, you need to start on long acting benzo. If you are on 4mg of Xanax per day, you need to start with about 40mg of Valium. Titrate down 5% per week. This should not be too bad, but the last 2.5mgs will be tough. I recommend you switch to Seroquel 50mg per day at bedtime at that time with Propranolol 40mg per day in the morning. Increase the Seroquel up to 200mg, 50mg per week, but don't go higher than 80mg for the propranolol. You're already trying gabapentin, but it's not going to help you until your benzo receptors are clear. You should not add gabapentin to the Seroquel/Propranolol cocktail until you are at least 4 weeks out from your last diazepam dose. The stuff has a very long half life.


#32 BioHacker=Life

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Posted 27 March 2018 - 05:33 PM

No studies have shown any concerning side effects in healthy adults. You seem to be generalizing your bac reaction to every potential drug out there that could help you.


Edited by BioHacker=Life, 27 March 2018 - 05:34 PM.


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#33 Jiminy Glick

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Posted 27 March 2018 - 05:48 PM

Ashwagandha, kratom with turmeric, magnesium glycinate, taurine, and a good diet are all good for anxiety.


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#34 Voulezvous

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Posted 27 March 2018 - 06:45 PM

Thank you. I do take some of those. I’ve never tried kratom or ashwagandha.

But I have so many adverse effects from meds. Even lemon balm extract seems to make me edgier. I think there must be a pattern, a chemical thing like MTHFR gene mutation.

I think I will add taurine and ashwagandha to the list. Thank you.

Edited by Voulezvous, 27 March 2018 - 06:46 PM.


#35 Voulezvous

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Posted 31 March 2018 - 06:27 AM

This study looks interesting. Has anyone heard of it?
“Electroacupuncture for tapering off long-term benzodiazepine use: study protocol of randomized controlled trial”

https://www.ncbi.nlm...les/PMC5374579/

Edited by Voulezvous, 31 March 2018 - 06:31 AM.


#36 gamesguru

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Posted 01 April 2018 - 01:14 AM

ginseng and ginkgo are underrestimaed here, because they're presynaptic antagonists they can reduce traffic and bring the postsynaptic sites back up to speed

 

so for the OP, i would prune the stack down as follows

 

- Turmeric (400 mg)

- Ginkgo (80 mg)
- Magnesium (100 mg)


#37 Voulezvous

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Posted 01 April 2018 - 01:43 AM

Thanks gamesguru. Can you clarify? Are you recommending ginkgo over ginseng?



ginseng and ginkgo are underrestimaed here, because they're presynaptic antagonists they can reduce traffic and bring the postsynaptic sites back up to speed

so for the OP, i would prune the stack down as follows

- Turmeric (400 mg)
- Ginkgo (80 mg)
- Magnesium (100 mg)



#38 Hyperflux

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Posted 01 April 2018 - 08:08 PM

I am surprised that no one mentioned the two heavy hitters when it comes to benzo withdrawals and recovery: BPC-157 and black seed oil. Those two are essential in my opinion and personal experience. I wouldn't bother with anything else if you got those two but Ashwaganda and N-Acetyl Selank (not amidated) are good adjuncts.



#39 Eryximachus

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Posted 01 April 2018 - 08:52 PM

I am surprised that no one mentioned the two heavy hitters when it comes to benzo withdrawals and recovery: BPC-157 and black seed oil. Those two are essential in my opinion and personal experience. I wouldn't bother with anything else if you got those two but Ashwaganda and N-Acetyl Selank (not amidated) are good adjuncts.

 

The studies on BPC-157 seem promising, but the question is where do you source it? 

 

I have never been impressed with peptides acquired from gray market sources.  


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#40 BioHacker=Life

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Posted 01 April 2018 - 11:43 PM

 

I am surprised that no one mentioned the two heavy hitters when it comes to benzo withdrawals and recovery: BPC-157 and black seed oil. Those two are essential in my opinion and personal experience. I wouldn't bother with anything else if you got those two but Ashwaganda and N-Acetyl Selank (not amidated) are good adjuncts.

 

The studies on BPC-157 seem promising, but the question is where do you source it? 

 

I have never been impressed with peptides acquired from gray market sources.  

 

 

I've tried abunch and had some batches tested. Never had a problem so far but I go with larger companies.



#41 gamesguru

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Posted 03 April 2018 - 01:00 AM

nope i just removed a bunch of stuff from his stack.  ginseng wasn't part of it.  not sure which one is more effective, is it GABA-A or GABA-B that we're after here?  it would be great if people here tried both and reported their results, instead of having me speaking in the abstract.  individual neurochemistry no doubt factors into the decision as well, with distressed, panicky/ruminating types tending toward ginseng while more relaxed forms of inattention benefit most from ginkgo.

 

Thanks gamesguru. Can you clarify? Are you recommending ginkgo over ginseng?

 



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#42 Voulezvous

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Posted 03 April 2018 - 05:14 AM

Have you gotten back to your regimen? I’d like to hear about it.

I’m curious about this study you cited. I thought that flumazenil caused seizures if combined with benzodiazepines.

I found the study online, but not anything about dosages, or preparation, contraindications, safeguards.
I really want to know if there’s more information out there.


Do you know of a method using flumazenil if benzos haven’t been discontinued?
I was having great success decreasing from 4 mg daily Xanax to only one, at night.
But I didn’t stick it out very long. I’m back to 3 mg Xanax a day. I’d really love to quit.

I’m not a candidate for treatment for overdose. Just built up tolerance.

Yeah there's a few studies on it it would get you back to your native or baseline dose so probably 1 mg.

Here's one interesting one.

Eur J Pharmacol. 1986 Dec 2;132(1):31-8. Periodic benzodiazepine antagonist administration prevents benzodiazepine withdrawal symptoms in...

" Every third day administration of the benzodiazepine antagonist, Ro15-1788, during a similar period of continuous diazepam exposure, significantly decreases withdrawal behaviors."
" It is postulated that physical dependence reverts to a drug naive state after each exposure to the benzodiazepine antagonist. This treatment may represent a possible therapeutic approach for preventing the (time dependent) development of physical dependence and the accompanying severe withdrawal symptoms."

Edited by Voulezvous, 03 April 2018 - 05:20 AM.






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