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Cortisol - How do we lower it?

cortisol

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#1 protoject

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Posted 09 May 2018 - 09:44 PM


Hey folks, I am wondering if there is some current trending information on how to lower cortisol, or what the current information is for what the MOST EFFECTIVE (and most sane) ways of lowering cortisol are. Looks like mine is 100 above normal due to my depression or whatever is causing the issue. I am sure this topic has been covered here before and I am aware of some ways of lowering cortisol but was wondering if you've heard any updates, or if you happen to be well articulated can lay out a framework for the most robustly proven vs least robust. Right now I don't have time to research the topic because I am researching something else so I hope to return to some good information when I have more time. Otherwise when I get the time I think it will be worth me collecting information that I can find and posting it in here to answer my own question for others if someone else hasn't beaten me to the punch by then.

 

In the meantime I will be researching how sleep deprivation and insomnia affects epigenetics and genetics (among other because I want to find specific environmental conditions and lifestyles that could decrease any negative impacts or, if there is a best adaptive strategy to sleep deprivation situations (when sleep is impossible. I have a strong inclination to think adaptive strategies could be highly beneficial to insomniacs so I'm hunting the information now, hopefully not to get distracted.... me being distracted the reason that I even came here to ask this question, lol. I have chronic A.D.D. , I'll try to go back and focus on what i was doing)



#2 protoject

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Posted 10 May 2018 - 12:12 AM

Edit: according to my other blood results the elevated cortisol (during a period of the day when it should NOT even be spiking with in normal limits) may be related to some chronic disease state (a few have been postulated with further testing needed) 



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#3 albedo

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Posted 10 May 2018 - 09:50 AM

You might find useful the following links from LEF as starting point. I would also look at the balance and the cortisol/dhea ratio:

 

http://www.lifeexten...ortisol/Page-01

http://www.lifeexten...ortisol/Page-01

http://www.lifeexten...ortisol/Page-01

http://www.lifeexten...ortisol/Page-01



#4 MichaelTheAnhedonic

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Posted 10 May 2018 - 04:01 PM

I am having trouble with cortisol too. I don't know what's causing the spikes. One of the possible causes is my infection in my tooth. Chronic inflammation can lead to cortisol spikes AFAIK - can someone confirm that...? It a little bit sucks, got weight gain, acne, increased heart rate, even psoriasis (that's maybe is not related to cortisol) and IBS. It looks like anxiety disorder but my doc said it's caused by something not psychological but physical. 

 

Dunno much about decreasing it, I only know about exercise (but not too much), Rhodiola Rosea, mirtazapine (drug) and Ashwagandha.


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#5 CarlSagan

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Posted 10 May 2018 - 05:40 PM

Phosphatidylserine might be one to look at. Haven't done a deep dive but skimming there's a link to reducing cortisol with this. (the cow brain version has a link to mad cow disease but there's soy or sunflower versions you can take instead).

 

Effects of phosphatidylserine on the neuroendocrine response to physical stress in humans

 

https://www.ncbi.nlm.../pubmed/2170852

 

Lowered cortisol response to exercise      (cortisol might be raised by intense exercise but lowered by low intensity exercise https://www.ncbi.nlm...ubmed/18787373)

 

https://www.ncbi.nlm.../pubmed/1325348

 

 


Edited by CarlSagan, 10 May 2018 - 06:00 PM.

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