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Formulation of dark chocolate as a carrier to deliver eicosapentaenoic and docosahexaenoic acids: Effects on product qua

pufa-enriched foods dha cocao chocolate

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#1 Ruth

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Posted 08 July 2018 - 04:24 PM


https://www.scienced...308814618302449 Formulation of dark chocolate as a carrier to deliver eicosapentaenoic and docosahexaenoic acids: Effects on product quality

In this study, dark chocolate enriched with EPA (eicosapentaenoic acid) and DHA (docosahexaenoic acid) was developed using various forms and origins. Quality characteristics such as physical, thermo-gravimetric, rheological, textural and sensory properties of chocolates were investigated. The highest EPA/DHA stability was determined in samples prepared by free-flowing powder and microencapsulated forms of omega-3 fatty acids (FA). The L∗ and C∗ values varied from 32.16–33.37 and 7.45–8.09, respectively for the all samples. Hardness values ranged between 6422 and 8367 N and the use of EPA/DHA in the triglyceride form caused softer chocolate whereas control sample was the hardest sample. Melting and rheological properties were not significantly affected by the studied EPA/DHA sources (P < 0.05). Microencapsulated EPA/DHA added chocolate was the most preferred source whereas sample with algae oil showed the lowest acceptability. According to the results, dark chocolate can be used for delivering omega-3 FA by considering their origin and physical form.
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#2 Ruth

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Posted 08 July 2018 - 04:51 PM

https://www.scienced...128146255000145 Historically, edible wild plants have been used as medical components throughout different regions of the world (e.g., China, Jordan, Egypt, Greece). Over the past decade, their possible applications in the food and drug industries have been extensively researched, due to renewed interest in novel bioactive phytochemicals with nutraceutical and pharmaceutical properties. The main bioactive compounds currently recognized in medicinal wild plants are phenolic compounds, volatile, and essential oil components, and small chain peptides. Unique chemical features of phenolics from wild medicinal plants have a broad range of applications in the health sector as functional food ingredients, nutraceuticals, dietary supplements, and drugs. Numerous studies have shown phenolic extracts to have anticancer, antiviral, antiinflammatory, hypolipidemic, antioxidant, antidiabetic, antihypertensive, and hypoglycemic effects in vivo, due to the ability of phenolics to interact with biological molecules such as DNA, hormones, and enzymes (e.g., angiotensin-I converting enzyme [ACE], α-glucosidase, and α-amylase), and to modulate cell-signaling pathways and epigenetic modifications. This chapter will cover the chemical, nutraceutical, and pharmaceutical properties of selected wild medicinal herbs (thyme, spearmint, and rosemary) and their phenolic constituents

Chapter 15 - Pharmaceutical, Nutraceutical and Therapeutic Properties of Selected Wild Medicinal Plants: Thyme, Spearmint, and Rosemary
https://www.scienced...271531717311594
Heat stress (HS) induced by exposure to high ambient temperatures or prolonged excessive physical activities is known to primarily induce deleterious effects on the intestinal integrity by disrupting junctional complexes. Considering the association of l-arginine (l-Arg) with the improvement of gut function, the hypothesis of this study was to assess whether l-Arg supplementation can prevent the intestinal barrier disruption under HS conditions and to understand whether the l-Arg–induced effects are associated with maintaining nitric oxide (NO) as the major product of l-Arg metabolism. For this study, human colorectal adenocarcinoma (Caco-2) cells grown on Transwell inserts were pretreated with different l-Arg concentrations (0.4, 1, and 4 mmol/L), and after exposure to HS, markers of intestinal barrier integrity, stress-related markers, and NO levels were determined. l-Arg deprivation markedly increased the mRNA expression of heat shock protein 70 and heme-oxygenase-1 under HS conditions. The HS-induced drop in transepithelial electrical resistance values and increase in Lucifer Yellow permeability could be prevented by 4 mmol/L l-Arg supplementation. In turn, l-Arg mitigated the downregulation and delocalization of adherens junction protein E-cadherin in HS-exposed cells. NO and inducible NO synthase levels were significantly decreased in HS-exposed cells, whereas pretreatment with 4 mmol/L l-Arg prevented this decrease. Inhibition of inducible NO synthase by the NO synthase inhibitor l-NG-nitroarginine methyl ester abrogated the effect of l-Arg on preserving intestinal integrity under HS conditions as measured by transepithelial electrical resistance, Lucifer Yellow flux, and E-cadherin expression. In summary, l-Arg supplementation protects the intestinal epithelial integrity, at least partly, by maintaining NO synthesis under HS conditions.
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#3 Ruth

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Posted 08 July 2018 - 05:02 PM

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