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Interesting move by the FDA

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#1 YOLF

  • Location:Delaware Delawhere, Delahere, Delathere!

Posted 27 September 2018 - 07:00 PM


 

FDA Asks for Input on Use of the Names of Dairy Foods in Labeling Plant-Based Products

 
September 27, 2018
 
The U.S. Food and Drug Administration is issuing a request for information as it examines its approach to the use of dairy food names like “milk,” “cheese,” or “yogurt” in the labeling of plant-based foods and beverages.
 
Earlier this year, FDA Commissioner Scott Gottlieb announced FDA's Nutrition Innovation Strategy (NIS) in a speech to the National Food Policy Conference. The strategy promotes public health through efforts to empower consumers to make better and more informed decisions about their diets and health, fostering the development of healthier food options, and expanding the opportunities to use nutrition to reduce morbidity and mortality due to chronic disease.
 
As part of its strategy, the FDA is considering approaches to modernize standards of identity, which are regulations that set forward requirements for the content and sometimes the methods used to produce certain foods.
 
Many dairy products, such as milk, yogurt, and certain cheeses, have standards of identity set by regulation. The regulations were established under the foods’ common or usual names, such as “milk,” “yogurt,” and “cheddar cheese.” These names have continued in common usage and are recognized by the American public as identifying the dairy foods described in the standards.  More recently, these names have appeared in the labeling of plant-based products as part of the name or statement of identity of the product.  Some examples include “soy milk” or “almond milk” and “vegan mozzarella cheese.”  
 
The FDA supports choice and innovation in the marketplace and recognizes that some consumers may prefer to use plant-based products instead of dairy products for a variety of reasons, including an allergy or lifestyle choice. But the FDA has concerns that the labeling of some plant-based products, which can vary widely in their nutritional content, is leading consumers to believe that those products have the same key nutritional attributes as dairy products. And the agency wants to make sure that labeling plant-based products with names that include the names of dairy foods is not misleading to consumers.
 
So the FDA is soliciting public input to answer the following questions:
  • How do you use plant-based products?
  • What is your understanding of dairy terms like milk, yogurt and cheese when they are used to label plant-based products?
  • Do you understand the nutritional characteristics of plant-based products? Do you know how they’re different from each other? Do you know how their nutritional qualities compare with dairy products?
Over the next year, the FDA will be looking at next steps, which will include issuing guidance for industry. This would clarify FDA’s thinking regarding the labeling of plant-based products with names that include the names of dairy foods while giving manufacturers adequate notice about any changes.
 
Comments must be submitted on or before 60 days after date of publication in the Federal Register.
  • To submit electronic comments, go to https://www.regulations.gov. 
  • Written comments must be sent to: Docket Management Staff (HFA-305), Food and Drug Administration, 5630 Fishers Lane, Room 1061, Rockville, MD 20852.
Further instructions can be found in the Request for Information.
 
For Additional Information:

 

This is actually pretty impressive. The FDA is actually acknowledging the role of foods in chronic disease and aiming to revise long term safety where the rest of the world's attitude, at least in some areas, is that 'it's just food,' i won't hurt you. Now if only screening for all of these things was mandatory and government sponsored, then we'd get to see a drop in healthcare needs or a reallocation of healthcare dollars to things that are more important.



#2 Oakman

  • Location:CO

Posted 27 September 2018 - 08:02 PM

It's certainly a two-edge sword. If you came from Mars, or a different country, naming can cause confusion for sure.  Clearly, “vegan mozzarella cheese” makes no literal sense. However, if you are part of this culture, relating the taste, texture and color of one food to another imitation food, makes perfect sense. You know it's vegetarian, you want to know what it's trying to be, and the name tells you. Buy it or pass.

 

The problem with banning such naming is what to use instead - "textured stringy plant protein substance" just doesn't have the same 'je ne sais quoi". 



#3 YOLF

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Posted 28 September 2018 - 01:28 AM

Well, I think a more specific example would be how to list something like calcium lactate. Not everyone will know that it's got lactose in it or that it's the equivalent of a concentrated milk byproduct and there are much more complicated examples of this. Is fruit flavor from corn? What are natural flavors? Are they from milk? We need to know these things. I imagine calcium lactate might listed as dairy equivalent Ca lactate or DairE Ca lactate, oslt. Or perhaps they'll add QR codes to product labels and there will be a phone app for that... though seniors who are most affected won't be able to use it. Maybe in isle scanners could list ingredients the way they do prices and other information?

 

 

 

Corn seed is actually a vegetable, a grain, and a fruit.

https://articles.ext...ow-about-field-

 

Hopefully they'll do this with alcohol too. We have alot of domestic alcohol producers that are just mom and pop industries. This would be a good way to achieve the 'America First' mandate if I want to play politics for now. Basically, put your secret ingredients on the label and stop poisoning people or get out and we'll replace your *ss with a Domestic that will.

 

I imagine if they did do the in store scanners in liquer stores... they'd be behind the counter. lol


Edited by YOLF, 28 September 2018 - 01:32 AM.


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#4 sdxl

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Posted 28 September 2018 - 06:41 AM

Well, I think a more specific example would be how to list something like calcium lactate. Not everyone will know that it's got lactose in it or that it's the equivalent of a concentrated milk byproduct and there are much more complicated examples of this. 

 

Calcium lactate can be dairy-free and totally vegan. You don't need any lactose to produce lactate.



#5 YOLF

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Posted 28 September 2018 - 04:37 PM

Calcium lactate can be dairy-free and totally vegan. You don't need any lactose to produce lactate.

 

But for certain lactose/galactose intolerant types, it can be problematic for digestion, causing gas, bloating, and other symptoms. So the similarity of the molecule to dairy ingredients is still very important and shouldn't be overlooked simply b/c it didn't come from dairy. 



#6 sdxl

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Posted 29 September 2018 - 08:26 AM

But for certain lactose/galactose intolerant types, it can be problematic for digestion, causing gas, bloating, and other symptoms. So the similarity of the molecule to dairy ingredients is still very important and shouldn't be overlooked simply b/c it didn't come from dairy. 

 

Lactic acid and its salts like calcium lactate and lactose are different molecules. Lactic acid can be produced by fermentation from many sugars, including lactose. Lactose is too expensive for industrial fermentation to produce lactic acid, that's why cheaper sugars are used. Lactate is produced in the body and if found in fermented non-dairy and dairy foods. It has got nothing to do with milk other that it was discovered in it.


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#7 YOLF

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Posted 29 September 2018 - 04:53 PM

I stand corrected. I suppose I had assumed that bloating from using calcium lactate was a result of it being a structural relative to lactose, perhaps the milk like bloating I experience from it comes from a byproduct of how the brand I bought is produced? If that byproduct is common and causes my symptoms, I suppose my point still stands, otherwise, I'll have to find another example. 

 

Good thing I have you guys to point out the flaws in my assumptions.


Edited by YOLF, 29 September 2018 - 04:55 PM.

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