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Gene editing pioneer and Harvard professor - Dr. George Church

harvard genetics podcast crspr nebula

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#1 onz

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Posted 07 February 2019 - 04:27 PM


Very excited to announce our next guest on the longecity podcast is Dr. George Church!

 

His upcoming gene editing research on dogs is aimed at reversing ageing with the goal of moving this to humans in approximately 8 years! :|o  :-D  You can read more about it in this article.

 

You can also watch this YouTube video where Dr. Church speaks about the delivery of 45 gene editing therapies, all targeted at reversing age-related disease. 

 

He's also the co-founder of Nebula Genomics, which empowers people to contribute to genetic research while dramatically reducing the cost of genome services to make it affordable for everyone:)

 

The interview is scheduled for next Friday the 15th February, let us know if you have any questions in the comment section below  :laugh:

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Edited by Mind, 07 February 2019 - 06:56 PM.

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#2 Lothar

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Posted 12 February 2019 - 01:44 PM

If nobody wants to know something from Prof. Church I'll take the chance to ask five questions all at once:
 
1. I've seen that Prof. Church belongs to the advisory board of the SENS foundation:
 
 
So I want to know the relation between his work in the aging research field and the SENS approach: what have they in common, where are the main differences? Is it - for instance - the following:
 
„Church: By going straight to human cells, we won't get into the trap of spending years working on mice, which is rather expensive, only to find out that it doesn't work in humans. We can actually do a cheaper and more relevant study in human cells, confirm them in mice, then test them in larger animals, and then in humans. I think that going from human cells to mice and back to humans is likely to save us time and money."
 
 
2. Does his work aim only on some factors that cause aging or on all?
 
3. Every time someone is making a prediction about upcoming breakthroughs in anti-aging research for humans this has tremendous consequences for probably millions of people. Especially for the elder ones the question whether it will last less than ten or more than twenty or even thirty years etc. is a matter of life and death! So I want to know how solid this above quoted - in my opinion revolutionary - prediction* of just 8 years really is!?
 
- What are the relevant factors, that this will really come true? 
- What are nearer milestones or interim results to judge, whether the scientific development is in time, or slower or even faster? 
- How are the different experiments, the 65 gene therapies that are being tested in mice and larger animals*, working? 
- Are they already into phase one trails in humans?
- Latest results?
 
 
4. I've read that Prof. Church is involved in a lot of different scientific fields, for instance he is permanent portrayed in the media for the attempt of bringing back the mammoth by new genetic means. My question is what priority has the aging research in all of his works? And especially how many employees in how many teams work for him in the anti-aging field?  Has he enough scientists or is it a question of financing to even speed up the development?
 
5. What is his opinion about several other promising studies in the anti-aging field and are there overlaps to his own works like Senolytics, Metformin, Parabiosis, the Calico approach, or the work of Craig Venters Human Longevity Inc. ... to name only a few?

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#3 Mind

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Posted 12 February 2019 - 06:42 PM

I recall at one point that Dr. Church said he did not want to extend his own life or rejuvenate. I am not 100% sure this is an accurate assessment of his opinion, but I intend to find out. Being that he is so involved with the rejuvenation scene, I would suspect he would want to live a lot longer.



#4 Lothar

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Posted 12 February 2019 - 07:08 PM

@ Mind: I suspect too. See the following quote from the Technology Review article, which is linked above by the thread starter:
 
„In a January presentation about his project at Harvard, Davidsohn closed by displaying a picture of a white-bearded Church as he is now and another as he was decades ago, hair still auburn. Yet the second image was labelled 2117 AD—100 years in the future.
 
The images reflect Church's aspirations for true age reversal. He says he'd sign up if a treatment proved safe, or even as a guinea pig in a study. Essentially, Church has said, the objective is to "have the body and mind of a 22-year-old but the experience of a 130-year-old.""
 


#5 xEva

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Posted 13 February 2019 - 06:50 AM

In the lecture you linked, several times, he refers to CRISPR as "genome vandalism". Could he elaborate on this?

 

the other question has already come up on the forum, is about the immune response to the viruses used in the genetic therapy.  Like, is it true that it can be done only once, because the immune response will not allow it the second time? What if the person has been naturally exposed to the particular virus used  and already has antibodies to it?   


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#6 xEva

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Posted 13 February 2019 - 07:33 PM

And another question. In a lecture a year ago (on youtube) he mentions a study  where the endogenous viruses were edited out of a mouse genome. Q: What was the impact on the development, health and lifespan of those mice?   



#7 xEva

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Posted 18 February 2019 - 05:47 PM

so where is the podcast itself?  Is there a link somewhere?



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#8 Mind

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Posted 18 February 2019 - 06:08 PM

The podcast is done. I got in most of the questions. We are working on the editing now. The was a little trouble in the recording, so we might have to transcribe this one.







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