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Can I feel anything from doing one testosterone injection?

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#1 calm--

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Posted 12 April 2019 - 09:35 AM


Hi, I've been having brain fog, depression, anxiety, restlessness, easily stressed-out, insomnia and bunch of other symptoms for years. Right now I'm working with a functional medicine doctor. One of the lab test show I have Low T.

 

I'm not really looking to do TRT because the side-effects worry me, and I dont like the idea of having to be dependent on it for the rest of my life. So I said to my doc that I prefer to try to increase it naturallly and he's okay with it.

 

But he suggested to try one shot of TRT and see how I feel. He wants to get an idea how Low T is affecting me, if it is the main cause of my symptoms before pursuing the natural route, because he said trying to increase it naturally is a long process. My symptoms may be caused by other things.

 

So my questions are :

  1. Is injection the fastest way to feel anything? I'm looking for it effects on brain fog, mood and anxiety.

  2. Will doing one injection enough to feel anything? If it does, how long before I can feel something?

  3. Do I have to worry about side-effects from doing one injection?

  4. Do I have to worry about it shutting down natural T production from one injection?

 



#2 Kodiak

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Posted 12 April 2019 - 06:49 PM

Based on the info I've read throughout the years on testosterone, the symptoms you listed seem fairly indicative of low testosterone. How old are you? How's your energy level? How's your ability to recover after exercise?

 

The side effects of TRT are pretty minimal. I think at most you'd probably have to monitor your estrogen level with labs that your doctor should hopefully set up and agree that it's a wise idea for you. A TRT dose is around 50-100mg per week if I recall, so if you chose to stop at some point, you could transition back to being "natural" pretty easily. Depending on your age, you may need some Clomid and more labs to monitor your natural test and estrogen level but again, it's nothing to worry about. (I should preface all this by saying this transition back to natural may be a bit "tougher" or take longer if you're older as the body just doesn't "bounce back" like someone who's younger.)

 

I don't think trying to increase T naturally is a "long" process. I think it's an ineffective process. Lots of products out there have wild claims and junk science behind them so I'm wondering what your plan is do increase yours naturally? Longjack, trib, avena and zinc immediately come to mind but I don't have much faith that they'll improve the symptoms you listed. 

 

1. Injection is the fastest way to get T into your bloodstream, I believe. Transdermal applications have to cross the skin and is poorly absorbed. There are others on this board who have more knowledge on this for sure.

2. A TRT dose is conservative but I think you'd feel a bit more energetic and a little more hornier. Depending on the ester your doc uses, if you feel anything it could be from one day (if it's suspension but I don't think docs use that) to a week (if it's enanthate or cyp but I don't think they use those either).

3. No. Absolutely not. 

4. No. Absolutely not.

 

You won't incur side effects or harm anything, but you won't feel like Superman and notice a significant improvement off one shot, either. If anything, having the one shot in your system will help calm some of these fears/concerns you have.

 

When it comes to using T, there seems to be two kinds of people: those who immediately see the benefits of being on T/TRT and are excited by those benefits, then others who are averse to T where the risks loom front and center in their mind. This is where educating yourself about T will help and having a critical mind regarding the sensationalism out their about their risks is important. Right now as I read your post, you seem to have a fair amount of worry and concern and that's fine, but that leads me to think that no matter how much T helps you (if it does help with your symptoms), it's always going to bother you or worry you that you're on it, and because of that you won't get as positive of an experience as you could, if that makes any sense. 

 

I'm 42. I've been on T in the past for cycles here and there. And as I age, part of me looks forward to being on it forever for better mood, energy and quality of life. But along with being on comes the need (for some) regular labs, HCG shots, procuring these things, possibly the use of Clomid/Tamoxifen, and all that can turn into a headache over time. I had concerns initially but I tried to educate myself about the risks and benefits and such. If you're going to try it then go on T with an open mind and a good attitude. Maybe keep a journal so you can monitor how you feel. Stay in close contact with your doctor if that helps you feel better about taking it. 

 

 



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#3 calm--

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Posted 14 April 2019 - 08:27 AM

Thanks a lot kodiak. I'm 42 as well. Couple months ago I tried weight training only once, and I notice fatigue and irritability for 2 days. Couple months before that, I did a short slow jog (only like 3 minutes) and I notice more brain fog and being depressed the rest of the day.



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#4 Puppalupacus

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Posted 14 April 2019 - 04:45 PM

I think you're being a little too cautious with TRT.  If you have low testosterone, as you have felt, the impact to quality of life is such that TRT becomes necessitated.. unless you just want to keep feeling that way.  The problem is most physicians don't know what they are doing with TRT.  A functional medicine doctor definitely has a leg up over your generic MD, though.  Most physicians prescribe way too much testosterone and don't even monitor estrogen, and if hematocrit gets too high, that just throws most MD's for a loop because all of the ones I've seen had never even ordered a therapeutic phlebotomy before.  Now, I do them myself.  Anyway, if your doctor is good and monitors you regularly, you can absolutely undertake TRT with minimal side effects.  It will be a work in progress for years, probably, but the alternative is feeling like shit the rest of your life unless you can find the underlying cause. 

 

To your questions:

 

1.  Injection isn't necessarily the fastest.  Compounded creams work well, but I personally have had issue with it aromatizing (turning to estrogen) far too readily.  Gels were absolutely worthless for me and messy.  Never tried pellets.  Fuck pellets.  Way too many assumptions are made when pellets are implanted.  However, for six years or so, I have been on daily sub-q injections of testosterone.  I monitor my labs myself every quarter for lipids, thyroid, blood chemistry (hematocrit especially), and iron.

 

2.  Yes, you will feel it.  In fact, that first injection will probably make you feel so good you'll end up chasing it, only to never feel it again.  Not sure why it happens.  Your body is likely highly sensitive to testosterone right now and is starved for it.

 

3.  Nah.

 

4.  Nah.

 

 



#5 calm--

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Posted 15 April 2019 - 05:18 AM

Thanks for the input guys. Not sure yet what I'm gonna do. I'm still trying to learn more.



#6 calm--

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Posted 27 May 2019 - 11:51 AM

Based on the info I've read throughout the years on testosterone, the symptoms you listed seem fairly indicative of low testosterone. How old are you? How's your energy level? How's your ability to recover after exercise?

 

The side effects of TRT are pretty minimal. I think at most you'd probably have to monitor your estrogen level with labs that your doctor should hopefully set up and agree that it's a wise idea for you. A TRT dose is around 50-100mg per week if I recall, so if you chose to stop at some point, you could transition back to being "natural" pretty easily. Depending on your age, you may need some Clomid and more labs to monitor your natural test and estrogen level but again, it's nothing to worry about. (I should preface all this by saying this transition back to natural may be a bit "tougher" or take longer if you're older as the body just doesn't "bounce back" like someone who's younger.)

 

I don't think trying to increase T naturally is a "long" process. I think it's an ineffective process. Lots of products out there have wild claims and junk science behind them so I'm wondering what your plan is do increase yours naturally? Longjack, trib, avena and zinc immediately come to mind but I don't have much faith that they'll improve the symptoms you listed. 

 

1. Injection is the fastest way to get T into your bloodstream, I believe. Transdermal applications have to cross the skin and is poorly absorbed. There are others on this board who have more knowledge on this for sure.

2. A TRT dose is conservative but I think you'd feel a bit more energetic and a little more hornier. Depending on the ester your doc uses, if you feel anything it could be from one day (if it's suspension but I don't think docs use that) to a week (if it's enanthate or cyp but I don't think they use those either).

3. No. Absolutely not. 

4. No. Absolutely not.

 

You won't incur side effects or harm anything, but you won't feel like Superman and notice a significant improvement off one shot, either. If anything, having the one shot in your system will help calm some of these fears/concerns you have.

 

When it comes to using T, there seems to be two kinds of people: those who immediately see the benefits of being on T/TRT and are excited by those benefits, then others who are averse to T where the risks loom front and center in their mind. This is where educating yourself about T will help and having a critical mind regarding the sensationalism out their about their risks is important. Right now as I read your post, you seem to have a fair amount of worry and concern and that's fine, but that leads me to think that no matter how much T helps you (if it does help with your symptoms), it's always going to bother you or worry you that you're on it, and because of that you won't get as positive of an experience as you could, if that makes any sense. 

 

I'm 42. I've been on T in the past for cycles here and there. And as I age, part of me looks forward to being on it forever for better mood, energy and quality of life. But along with being on comes the need (for some) regular labs, HCG shots, procuring these things, possibly the use of Clomid/Tamoxifen, and all that can turn into a headache over time. I had concerns initially but I tried to educate myself about the risks and benefits and such. If you're going to try it then go on T with an open mind and a good attitude. Maybe keep a journal so you can monitor how you feel. Stay in close contact with your doctor if that helps you feel better about taking it. 

Kodiak, I've been trying to read around, but cant understand this : Why would someone need to add clomid while on TRT?


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#7 Kodiak

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Posted 28 May 2019 - 01:30 PM

Calm,

 

I think some people use Clomid while on TRT or a steroid cycle to help keep their own testosterone production going. Exogenous test is suppressive to one's own internal production, so adding Clomid stimulates LH (luteinizing hormone) which stimulates testosterone production, I believe. I think the logic is that if you can keep your own test going, when you come off a steroid cycle or TRT (if one ever plans to come off TRT), then there's not a lag or "crash" and the loss of muscle gains is minimized. Since the exogenous test is no longer coming in, and since the internal test has been stopped because exogenous test is suppressive, there's a period of weeks to months where there's essentially no test at all until the body "wakes" back up and starts to produce its own test again. Also, some guys use Clomid while on a steroid cycle as an anti-estrogen to help prevent gyro or water retention. I think tamoxifen is better for this, and aromatase inhibitors are better yet.

 

Some guys apparently use Clomid in place of TRT. Have a look at this:

https://www.t-nation...one-replacement

 



#8 calm--

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Posted 28 May 2019 - 03:14 PM

Thanks Kodiak.

 

I read Clomid can cause some side-effects like mood problem, anxiety, vision problem, so it's kinda worrying.

 

I'm tired of feeling like crap so earlier today I went to an andrologist with the thought of doing TRT. He instead suggested trying HCG alone as he said HCG alone can sometime boost T, and I don't have to be on it forever. I just got one shot of Ovidrel (one shot is 250 mcg (6,500 IU) choriogonadotropin alfa). Do you think HCG alone is enough to boost T?

 

I'm not sure if I can find a good TRT doctor in my area. Is it possible to do all this without doctor supervision? I can order labs test without doctor, and I can buy cypionate or enanthate without prescription.


Edited by calm--, 28 May 2019 - 03:16 PM.


#9 Kodiak

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Posted 28 May 2019 - 03:53 PM

I've read those reported side effects of Clomid but I personally never experienced them. Granted, I'm a sample size of 1. You could always try it and if you notice a side effect, come off it. 

 

HCG can/will boost test but my concern, from what I've read, is that long-term exposure to HCG can/may desensitize receptors that produce LH, I think. Honestly, can't remember exactly what can get desensitized so you'll have to look it up. Personally, I'd rather be on TRT than HCG. I feel like TRT is more of a "known" than HCG, as it's a sure-fire way to boost test levels. 

 

And yes, it's absolutely possible to do all of this without a doctor, especially if you can get your own labs and injectable test. Millions of people do steroid cycles without doctor supervision (I can't speak for how intelligent their cycles are or how they manage/avoid any side effects) but you'll have to educate yourself some. Doing a TRT course of treatment shouldn't require too much: 2 injections of test a week at around 50-100mg per shot, and maybe a small amount of aromatase inhibitor to control estrogen, are pretty much where you start. 

 

John250 started a thread on here you should check out, titled "Everything you want to know about steroids ..." He's a good resource for your HCG question to get another opinion. 



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#10 calm--

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Posted 29 May 2019 - 03:43 AM

Thanks a lot Kodiak. I'll check that thread out.

 

The article on t-nation about clomid does make it sounds interesting. Reading excelmale.com though, it seems that rarely people feel good on clomid alone.

 

Is it possible to find the cause of low T and treat it instead?


Edited by calm--, 29 May 2019 - 03:47 AM.


#11 Kodiak

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Posted 29 May 2019 - 01:55 PM

I think finding the cause of low T is sort of nebulous. Getting older seems to lead to a decrease in T, having more body fat I think raises estrogen levels because fat cells have/release aromatase that converts T into E, poor diet doesn't help, some say environmental estrogens play a role, it's all kind of a hodgepodge of contributing factors. You could lean out (lose extra body fat) and eat a cleaner diet with plenty of "pro-T" foods (nuts, healthy fats, foods high in zinc. avoid soy) and do everything else "right" but I doubt your T level will rise substantially (even though you'd probably feel and look pretty darn good from these lifestyle improvements). In the end, and I think the most direct method, is if you want higher T you simply take TRT. 

 

The only way to know how you'll feel on Clomid is to try it for yourself. I never had any issues with it. Back in college before I had my Test/steroid sources I stacked Clomid with a 2-3 prohormones (they were legal back then in the mid-90s) and I grew like a weed. I was eating like a mofo and lifting heavy (and granted, I was also younger back then) but I felt like a champ. Again, sample size of 1. Give Clomid a shot, I don't think the half-life is too long (you'll have to verify) so if you feel emotional from it or have other issues just dump it. Like I suggested in my first response above, come into it with an open mind and try not to carry in all these other testimonials from others. See for yourself and assess appropriately. 

 

42 is too young to feel like ass. You have a lot of living left to do. If you want to experiment with HCG or Clomid, that's up to you so do what you feel is right. All roads will eventually lead you to TRT I think.



#12 calm--

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Posted 30 May 2019 - 12:22 PM

Thanks again kodiak. I'm on day 3 of hcg monotherapy. 1st and 2nd day it made me anxious. 3rd day i am starting to see some mood improvement. I am starting to get intrigue. With clomid as well. Or maybe even combining both.

If doing hcg monotherapy, or clomid alone, to raise T, are these lifelong commitment like TRT?

#13 Kodiak

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Posted 30 May 2019 - 01:01 PM

Glad you're feeling better, calm. 

 

I can't speak to how a combo of HCG and Clomid would turn out. I can only assume you'd raise T even more but I have a nagging suspicion you'd start to notice estrogen-related side effects. HCG has been known to raise E, so be on the lookout for water retention, gyno (it'll start with itchy or puffy nipples), and/or maybe increased blood pressure. One of the chief complaints of Clomid is it makes men feel emotional, although I don't believe it raises estrogen in any way. Just be aware of how you feel and do a little research so you know what drawbacks each potentially brings to the table so you can recognize them if they appear.

 

I would say yes, that to maintain a higher T level, you'd have to stay on HCG and/or Clomid indefinitely. Again, if I personally had a choice between TRT, Clomid and HCG and using one over the other longterm, it'd be TRT for sure, only because it's more of a "known". 



#14 calm--

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Posted 30 May 2019 - 10:59 PM

Thanks. I think I'll just gonna have to take the TRT route.



#15 calm--

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Posted 31 May 2019 - 12:48 AM

Sorry to keep asking about this. Somehow I just dont like the idea of doing TRT for life.

 

Do you think some supplements, like what listed here, have the chance of boosting T? And if I do managed to bring them up to a good level, are they needed for life too?

 

https://www.excelmal...ters-work.3538/

https://www.longecit...sterone-levels/



#16 Kodiak

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Posted 31 May 2019 - 02:57 PM

calm,

 

First off, I think you're getting anxious or intimidated by this "for life/life-long" idea when it comes to TRT instead of focusing on how you can feel better NOW or in the short-term. Who knows what life will bring? Maybe your priorities/goals will change in the years ahead, or you'll feel better by taking something else at some point, or, not to be morbid, a wild pack of roving poodles or a freak bass fishing accident will take you out. My point is don't get bogged down by this longview. Try TRT. Have an "end date" set and put it on the calendar. Tell yourself that in 7 weeks, you're coming off TRT no matter what. That way, you have an "escape plan" so you'll feel more comfortable and at ease while you're on TRT. Then, reassess in a few weeks. Maybe you feel great and are more at ease about being "on" and you decide to continue for another few weeks, or maybe you don't feel as well as you hoped so you ride it out for another few days or weeks to hit your end date and then get off. Focus on the short term, the "baby steps" instead of the "for life" idea. Make this whole experiment more digestible and comfortable. 

 

Also, it's great to have a doc who will administer HCG. You're lucky. And it's easy, at least here in the states, to get Clomid. Is getting Clomid easy for you? If so, keep those two options in your back pocket. You can always use these two things as a "plan b" in the manner described above. Small chucks of time to assess how you feel. I'd start with TRT, but that's just me. 

 

Is all this stuff needed for life? Yes, but don't say the "for life" thing...say "for as long as I want to boost my T or until I decide to stop or until my goals or priorities change." Again, keep this experiment manageable so you don't psych yourself out. And back to the overall question, yes, you'll need to keep taking any of this to keep your T elevated. If there's no input (HCG, TRT, Clomid, supplements), there's no output (sustained elevated T).

 

I'm not sold on the supplements. Could most of us benefit health-wise from consistent use of selenium, boron, fish oil, magnesium and vitamin D3? Most likely. But will these and other supplements really move the needle on testosterone elevation? I'd say nothing significantly. Besides, the cost involved would get to be too much, for me at least. Say you buy 5 supplements that are reported to boost T (bulbine, boron, zinc, long jack and d-aspartic acid, for example), and each bottle lasts one month at an average cost of $20/bottle. That's $1200 a year on maybe a double-digit T elevation. If that cost-to-benefit ratio looks good to you, go for it. In fact, test it out, just like you'll test it out like I described above. Buy whatever you think is potent and needed and do it for 6 weeks. See if you feel better. You'll only know AFTER you try it. 



#17 calm--

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Posted 01 June 2019 - 04:45 AM

Thanks kodiak. I understand I'm worrying too much and got in a bit of panic mode sometime. I'm planning to start TRT soon. It does seems like the right thing to do, but a lot of time I couldn't think clearly.



#18 Kodiak

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Posted 03 June 2019 - 12:57 PM

Keep me posted on how TRT goes, calm. Remember, small steps, digestible chunks, don't think so long-term about it. Experiment here in the short-term and enjoy how TRT (should) make you feel. 



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#19 calm--

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Posted 07 June 2019 - 05:32 AM

I'm hoping someone can give a bit of advice or pointers on starting trt. I often feel anxious and cant think clearly.

I cant find good doctors for trt in my area. I am considering defymedical.com which are recommended a lot by members in excelmale.com. They charge us$395 for the 1st 1 hour consult. Its quite a lot of money for me.

I am wondering if working with doctor is a necessity, or its simple enough that i can do by myself. I can get drugs and lab tests without prescription in my country.





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