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Fisetin accelerates the rate of telomere shortening

fisetin telomere ampk

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#1 Yamu Xu

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Posted 07 May 2019 - 09:52 AM


I read a paper that said Fisetin accelerates the rate of telomere shortening:
 
 
Accelerated Aging during Chronic Oxidative Stress: A Role for PARP-1

 

-------------------------

AMPK activators can inhibit SASP, and AMPK and mTOR regulate autophagy too, what's more, activate AMPK can protect telomere!

So don't eat fisetin everyday, just eat some safe AMPK activators to control chronic inflammatory.

 

BTW, Alive by Nature's pills of activator contain fisetin, be careful of this.

 

What's more, H2O2 can increase NF-κb and NF-κb can cause chronic inflammatory too, so drinking H2O2 to activate AMPK is not a good idea,  we can eat some safe AMPK activators! I recommend baicalein as AMPK activator, baicalein has a strong effect of anti-cancer, and it can extended life span in  animal experiment, related paper:

 

http://xueshu.baidu....&site=xueshu_se

 

 

 


Edited by Yamu Xu, 07 May 2019 - 09:53 AM.


#2 Yamu Xu

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Posted 07 May 2019 - 10:59 AM

extended life span→extend life span
 
Sorry for some spelling mistakes, English is not my first language.


#3 WillNitschke

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Posted 21 June 2019 - 12:13 PM

"However, under conditions of chronic oxidative stress, both fisetin and minocycline appeared to reduce the rate of telomere shortening. Since our study was limited to testing the effects of fisetin and minocycline in an in vitro model with HF cells that were chronically exposed to oxidative stress more research is needed to evaluate possible positive effects of fisetin and minocycline in chronic inflammatory diseases.

It can be concluded that chronic administration of pharmaceuticals or nutraceuticals with PARP inhibiting activity appears to be beneficial in conditions of chronic oxidative stress, but may be detrimental under relatively normal conditions."

 

This might hint at the possibility that fisetin may be beneficial for older people but counter productive for young healthy people. That might also explain why aged rats benefited so much. But this is all speculation, of course.



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#4 GABAergic

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Posted 21 June 2019 - 10:58 PM

"However, under conditions of chronic oxidative stress, both fisetin and minocycline appeared to reduce the rate of telomere shortening. Since our study was limited to testing the effects of fisetin and minocycline in an in vitro model with HF cells that were chronically exposed to oxidative stress more research is needed to evaluate possible positive effects of fisetin and minocycline in chronic inflammatory diseases.

It can be concluded that chronic administration of pharmaceuticals or nutraceuticals with PARP inhibiting activity appears to be beneficial in conditions of chronic oxidative stress, but may be detrimental under relatively normal conditions."

 

This might hint at the possibility that fisetin may be beneficial for older people but counter productive for young healthy people. That might also explain why aged rats benefited so much. But this is all speculation, of course.

 

good point. i wonder if not just fisetin but many other considered "anti-aging" compounds work the same way. i would definitely not suggest young healthy people to take them, thats for sure. im glad i never fell into the trap of doing fisetin too. all the supplements containing it are generally of poor control and quality so likely i wouldnt even get any real fisetin in me, but still staying on the safe side not using any at all is the best idea.



#5 WillNitschke

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Posted 21 June 2019 - 11:35 PM

The current trend in longevity research is to find compounds that 'stress' the body, i.e., do damage to it. So this therefore activates and stimulates self repair mechanisms to do more clean-up work. So there is going to be a combination of harm + benefit. You just want the benefit to outweigh the harm. Imagine if researchers looked a muscle fibers after a heavy resistance training session and saw all the cellular damage. The right conclusion to reach would not be to recommend nobody lift heavy weights. So everything depends on context. Unfortunately this field is very complex so it's difficult to make sweeping statements about taking or avoiding such molecules.


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#6 jakeb

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Posted 21 September 2019 - 03:53 AM

Seems like the most promising use of fisetin is very occaisional short term dosing, not chronic dosing. Very much in the style of chemotherapy.


Edited by jakeb, 21 September 2019 - 03:54 AM.


#7 Mind

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Posted 21 September 2019 - 09:28 AM

If any senolytic drug/therapeutic works effectively to clear senescent cells, then theoretically, it would not be needed very often, since the rate of senescent cell accumulation in the body is so slow.

 

An effective senolytic therapy should only need to be take once every few years. Taking an effective senolytic more often might lead to unwanted side effects.

 

It might be the case that the first class of senotlytic substances (fisetin, quercetin, some antibiotics and chemo drugs) only work to clear a some fraction of senescent cells and could be taken more frequently, but it is mostly guess-work at this point, since hardly any human results have been published.

 

Self-experimentation always carries some risks.


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#8 MikeDC

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Posted 24 September 2019 - 07:57 PM

PARP-1 is for DNA repair. If you inhibit DNA repair for long periods of time, DNA damages accumulate. That might cause more cancer.

#9 WillNitschke

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Posted 24 September 2019 - 10:51 PM

If this assumption was true:

 

If any senolytic drug/therapeutic works effectively to clear senescent cells, then theoretically, it would not be needed very often, since the rate of senescent cell accumulation in the body is so slow.

 

which it is not, then perhaps the theory might pan out.

Since senolytic drugs do not effectively clear all senescent cells.. (otherwise you'd just drop a pill or pills and you'd have no more grey hairs, etc.) wouldn't more regular dosing be beneficial or required?

What am I missing here?


Edited by WillNitschke, 24 September 2019 - 10:52 PM.


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#10 Engadin

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Posted 17 October 2019 - 04:01 PM

If this assumption was true:

 

 

which it is not, then perhaps the theory might pan out.

Since senolytic drugs do not effectively clear all senescent cells.. (otherwise you'd just drop a pill or pills and you'd have no more grey hairs, etc.) wouldn't more regular dosing be beneficial or required?

What am I missing here?

 

 

As far as I know, not all senolytics are killing all types of senescent cells at a time. They seem to act like snipers rather than shot gunners. So it looks to be room for various senolytics to exert its beneficial activity once in a several months period, alternating them so not to put your organism under excessive stress, letting it to replace the senescent cells killed by the available pool of stem cells.


Edited by Engadin, 17 October 2019 - 04:03 PM.

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#11 Mind

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Posted 18 October 2019 - 11:36 AM

As Aubrey points out here, senolytics (including fisetin) have worked spectacularly in animal models thus far - reversing a wide range of age-related illnesses. 

 

https://www.sens.org...enescent-cells/

 

The study referenced in the first post was in vitro (as far as I can tell), which is much lower quality evidence than animal models.







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