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Is there a link between Alzheimer's and zinc and magnesium?

zinc magnesium alzheimerss

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#1 osris

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Posted 16 December 2019 - 05:03 PM


Is there a link between Alzheimer's and zinc and magnesium?
 
There seems to be a lot of confusion around this subject, with some people saying that zinc and magnesium are implicated in Alzheimer's, while others saying that they are not. I can’t find any scientific information that comes to a definite conclusion about this. 
 
Does anyone know anything about this? And should I stop taking zinc and magnesium supplements to be on the safe side?


#2 Daniel Cooper

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Posted 17 December 2019 - 08:08 PM

If you simply look at individual studies, there seems to be at least one that links Alzheimer's with pretty much anything you can come up with.

 

Is there a link demonstrated by the preponderance of the available studies?  Not that I've seen.

 

 

 


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#3 osris

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Posted 19 December 2019 - 01:38 PM

I hope you're right, but see:
 
 
which seems to say that zinc can be both good and bad for Alzheimer's
 
And this one
 
 
on how magnesium can be both good and bad for it.
 
It's confusing.
 


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#4 recon

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Posted 25 December 2019 - 06:50 PM

This is certainly a very valid concern considering both zinc and magnesium being very popular supplements. Aided by advancements in formulations, we now have those with greater bioavailable than before, such as Zinc Monomethionine and Magnesium L-Threonate.

#5 graatch

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Posted 26 December 2019 - 06:36 AM

So in the alzheimer's brain you'll often see both large deposits and excessive signalling (ionic) of not only zinc and magnesium but iron (the potential neurotoxic effects of which are well known), aluminum which normally is removed, and other minerals and metals. The best idea is that this comes from dyshomeostasis of said substances; the brain has been damaged to the extent it can no longer effectively clear said minerals, its cleaning processes break down. Zinc in *excess* can help beta-amyloid aggregate or I should say further aggregate; zinc is also "important in axonal and synaptic transmission and is necessary for nucleic acid metabolism and brain tubulin growth and phosphorylation".

 

Thinking practically, don't take too much of any mineral. With zinc we do know that the range within which supplementation seems to improve things like blood sugar control (instead of worsening them) is very slim; dosing 30mg daily may be too much for most people particularly if copper isn't supplemented as well.


Edited by graatch, 26 December 2019 - 06:36 AM.

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#6 Mind

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Posted 26 December 2019 - 07:35 PM

From a higher level view, it is usually unwise to take larger doses of any supplement, nutrient, or mineral. Everything has a dose-response curve. The human psyche is prone to think "more is better". When it comes to health, this is almost never the case. There is a lot of research over the course of decades indicating that "mega-dosing" is negative for health and increases mortality rates.

 

https://www.longecit...han-good/page-1


Edited by Mind, 26 December 2019 - 10:07 PM.


#7 pamojja

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Posted 26 December 2019 - 08:31 PM

From a higher level view, it is usually unwise to take larger doses of any supplement, nutrient, or mineral. Everything has a dose-response curve.

 

Which is of course on the population level. On an individual level it is easy enough to access mineral status with laboratory testing (serum for zinc, RBC for magnesium) and supplement accordingly. If taking a population-level response courve as guidance, one is bound take too much and too little in different individuals.


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#8 Mind

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Posted 26 December 2019 - 10:08 PM

Which is of course on the population level. On an individual level it is easy enough to access mineral status with laboratory testing (serum for zinc, RBC for magnesium) and supplement accordingly. If taking a population-level response courve as guidance, one is bound take too much and too little in different individuals.

 

Agreed! It varies by individual and there are instances where therapeutic doses can correct a deficiency.



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#9 osris

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Posted 27 December 2019 - 04:12 PM

Seeing as the jury is still out on whether zinc and magnesium cause or contribute to Alzheimer's, I'll avoid both to be on the safe side.



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