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Protecting from Coronavirus - Supplements & Therapies

coronavirus flu disease epidemics viruses immunity covid-19

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#61 ambivalent

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Posted 08 March 2020 - 01:05 PM

Strong support for Vitamin C:

 

https://www.patrickh...bat-coronavirus

 

Also Black Elderberry in to the mix. 



#62 lancebr

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Posted 08 March 2020 - 02:37 PM

Strong support for Vitamin C:

 

https://www.patrickh...bat-coronavirus

 

Also Black Elderberry in to the mix. 

 

The advice about Vitamin C and Zinc are good.  Both of them are good for helping the body regulate and

control a cytokine storm which seems to be one factor in this Covid19 that damages the lungs.

 

The elderberry might be good to take to prevent getting the flu or a cold, but if you do catch the Covid19

virus then you should immediately stop taking the elderberry since studies have shown that elderberry can

actually increase the cytokine storm in the body causing more damage.


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#63 izan82

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Posted 08 March 2020 - 04:00 PM

Chinese government released a list of potential treatments to defeat corona.

 

 

Potential treatments to defeat novel coronavirus

 

 

http://en.people.cn/...00-9665722.html


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#64 kurdishfella

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Posted 08 March 2020 - 06:18 PM

Breakthrough: Chloroquine phosphate has shown apparent efficacy in treatment of COVID-19 associated pneumonia in clinical studies.

 
 
Israeli scientists: ‘In three weeks, we will have coronavirus vaccine’
 
 
California lab says it discovered coronavirus vaccine in 3 hours
 
 
 
(EDIT) I think they should let us know which race the people that get infected, die and survive are (Caucasoid, Mongoloid, and Negroid.). I think this is important. Who knows how many of the people in Italy or Iran who die off covid 19 are not just Chinese tourists or something? And which strain they died off.

Edited by kurdishfella, 08 March 2020 - 07:03 PM.


#65 lancebr

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Posted 08 March 2020 - 06:40 PM

Chinese government released a list of potential treatments to defeat corona.

 

 

Potential treatments to defeat novel coronavirus

 

 

http://en.people.cn/...00-9665722.html

 

It appears that Chloroquine Phosphate is turning out to be an effective treatment but I noticed

they said they recommend it for patients 18 to 65.  So what about patients over 65 which seems

to be a lot of the patients who are dying. Could a smaller dosage be used for older patients

and not have to worry about the serious side effects it has for the elderly.

 

I also noticed they says that "Chinese researchers have found that a cause of death for severe

and critically ill patients infected with the novel coronavirus is cytokine storm, an overreaction of

the immune system. These patients are found with a higher level of IL-6 in their blood"

So we need to make sure to take stuff that helps to reduce the cytokine storm and not increase it.

 

I really haven't been able to find any reputable sources for a recipe of this Qingfei Paidu Soup.

Some sources say it is made up of 21 different herbs. I did find this information...."Yu said one

herbal concoction, known as Qingfei Paidu Soup, which mixes ephedra and licorice root among

other ingredients, has emerged as an effective prescription and has been listed in the latest

diagnosis and treatment guide book"

 

I don't know what purpose ephedra would serve, but licorice root is very good for reducing the

cytokine storm,,,,so probably need to get a few bottles of licorice root to have on hand if needed.



#66 lancebr

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Posted 08 March 2020 - 06:49 PM

I was just able to locate this recipe for Qingfei Paidu Soup

 

 

Ephedra 9g

Licorice 6g

Almond 9g

Gypsum 15-30g (fried first)

Guizhi 9g

Alisma 9g

Poria cocos 9g

Atractylodes 9g

Poria cocos 15g

Bupleurum 16g

Scutellaria 6g

Ginger Pinellia 9g

Ginger 9g

Aster 9g

Winter Flower 9g

Shoot Dry 9g

Asarum 6g

Yam 12g

 

I noticed it has licorice root and scutelleria which are supposedly ACE2 inhibitors.

It also has ginger which is good for inflammation.

 

But a lot of these herbs would be hard to find since they seem to be predominant in Asia.



#67 Adaptogen

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Posted 08 March 2020 - 07:35 PM

The elderberry might be good to take to prevent getting the flu or a cold, but if you do catch the Covid19
virus then you should immediately stop taking the elderberry since studies have shown that elderberry can
actually increase the cytokine storm in the body causing more damage.


This information is based on what? There are plenty of published studies showing that elderberry reduces influenza duration and symptoms, inhibits virus replication, even binds to H1n1 in vitro. Do you really have any evidence to support this claim besides the fact that a bunch of health websites are repeating it?

There are both anti-inflammatory and proinflammatory cytokines, and the immunostimulatory effect of elderberry increases both. I'm pretty sure if elderberry actually worsened illness outcome, that would have come out in one of the numerous clinical trials that have been done. Instead, the outcome they do show is reduction in symptom severity and duration.
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#68 lancebr

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Posted 08 March 2020 - 09:41 PM

This information is based on what? There are plenty of published studies showing that elderberry reduces influenza duration and symptoms, inhibits virus replication, even binds to H1n1 in vitro. Do you really have any evidence to support this claim besides the fact that a bunch of health websites are repeating it?

There are both anti-inflammatory and proinflammatory cytokines, and the immunostimulatory effect of elderberry increases both. I'm pretty sure if elderberry actually worsened illness outcome, that would have come out in one of the numerous clinical trials that have been done. Instead, the outcome they do show is reduction in symptom severity and duration.

 

As per what the Chinese are saying about one of their treatment drugs:

 

"Tocilizumab, with the common brand name Actemra, is an injectable synthetic protein that blocks the effects of IL-6 in

patients with rheumatoid arthritis. IL-6 is a protein that the body produces when there is inflammation. The latest version

of the guideline suggests the use of Tocilizumab in patients with an increasing level of IL-6 and with extensive lesions in

both lungs or severe symptoms.

 

Chinese researchers have found that a cause of death for severe and critically ill patients infected with the novel coronavirus

is cytokine storm, an overreaction of the immune system. These patients are found with a higher level of IL-6 in their blood.

Last month, the increasing level of IL-6 was recommended as a warning sign that the patient's situation could possibly deteriorate."

 

So it appears that because of the cytokine storm caused by this coronavirus there is an increase in IL-6 that leads to

the damage of the lungs.

 

 

Here is a study showing that Black Elderbery not only increases levels of IL-6 but also increases levels of other inflammatory

cytokines (IL-1 beta, TNF-alpha, IL-8).

 

https://www.ncbi.nlm...pubmed/11399518

 

 

I have noticed that most health websites saying that elderberry is safe and not to worry about it increasing cytokine storms

are websites either selling elderberry products or associated with websites selling elderberry products.

 

If this coronavirus does most of its critical damage by increasing inflammatory cytokines like IL-6, then I personally would

not want to take something like elderberry that would also increase the inflammatory cytokines.  Seems counterproductive and

dangerous to me.

 

 

 

.


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#69 Hip

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Posted 09 March 2020 - 12:14 AM

Chinese researchers have found that a cause of death for severe and critically ill patients infected with the novel coronavirus
is cytokine storm, an overreaction of the immune system. These patients are found with a higher level of IL-6 in their blood.
Last month, the increasing level of IL-6 was recommended as a warning sign that the patient's situation could possibly deteriorate."
 
So it appears that because of the cytokine storm caused by this coronavirus there is an increase in IL-6 that leads to the damage of the lungs.

 

 

Interesting, would you have any links or references for that? 

 

If a cytokine storm is the cause of death in COVID-19 coronavirus infections, it's odd this virus should kill the old and the weak. In the case of the 1918 Spanish flu pandemic, which killed an estimated 50 million people worldwide, it was usually the young and healthy that died, whereas the old and weak tended to survive Spanish flu.

 

The theory of the Spanish flu is that if you are old and have a weaker immune system, then the cytokine response may be less, so less chance of having a tissue-damaging cytokine storm.

 

 

 

Anyway, here is a large list of IL-6 inhibitors. They reduce IL-6 in various ways and by various mechanisms. I am not sure which of these IL-6 inhibitors would be appropriate for reducing IL-6 levels in COVID-19 infections. We would need to see a paper indicating the route by which IL-6 is generated in COVID-19 infections in order to try to block that route with these inhibitor compounds. 

 

Note also that some of the studies I citied are in vitro, so it would be necessary to perform pharmacokinetic calculations to determine whether this compounds will work in vivo. Often high concentrations of the compound are uses in vitro, but these same concentrations may not be attainable in vivo, do to factors such as poor bioavailability or high plasma protein binding.

 

 

 

LIST OF IL-6 INHIBITORS
 

Four macrolides (roxithromycin, erythromycin, clarithromycin and azithromycin) inhibited IL-1β, TNF-α, IL-6 LPS-stimulated J774 macrophages. 1 (full text). NOTE: Roxithromycin is the only macrolide antibiotic that crosses the blood brain barrier.

Vitamin C and vitamin E inhibit muscle-derived IL-6. 1

Blueberries reduce TNF-α and IL-6 in mouse macrophages 1

Patchouli alcohol (from patchouli essential oil) inhibits IL-1β, TNF-α, IL-6 in mouse macrophages (RAW 264.7 cells) 1

Genistein inhibited LPS-induced IL-1beta, IL-6, and TNF-alpha expression in macrophages. 1

Vinpocetine inhibited the production of inflammatory factors such as IL-1β, IL-6 and TNF-α in BV-2 microglia. 1

Sulforaphane attenuates the LPS-induced increase of IL-1beta, IL-6, and TNF-alpha expression in microglia 1 Sulforaphane reduces TNF-α-induced IL-6 synoviocytes 1

Vitamin D inhibits LPS-induced IL-6 and TNF-α production in macrophages. 1

Cyclosporin A decreases human macrophage interleukin-6 synthesis. 1

Luteolin reduces IL-6 production in microglia. Luteolin: 90% drop in IL-6 production.1

Pretreatment of primary microglia with 10 and 25 μM luteolin reduced LPS-induced IL-6 production by 40% and 90%, respectively. When luteolin was increased to 50 μM, IL-6 secretion by LPS-stimulated microglia was completely blocked.

Alpha acids and iso-alpha acids in hops (found in beer) block the TNF-alpha induced production of IL-6. Alpha acids can be bought as the supplement Perluxan. 1

Polyphenols in non-alcoholic beer reduce IL-6 1

Calendula officinalis (marigold) inhibits IL-1beta, IL-6, TNF-alpha and IFN-gamma. 1

Niacinamide 1

Pyrroloquinoline quinone (PQQ) reduces IL-6 1

Macrolide antibiotics (like azithromycin and erythromycin) inhibit IL-6 1

Noopept reduces IL-6 by 1.8 times. 1

Nettle Leaf

Vitamin D3 and Vitamin E together inhibit IL-6

St. John's Wort (hypericum)

Vitamin K inhibits IL-6 from fibroblasts

Vitamin B2 (riboflavin) inhibits IL-6 in islet cells

PABA modulates IL-6 1

DHEA 1

Pregnenolone

Curcumin

Amla (Emblica officinalis) 1

Epimedium (horny goat weed) 1

Q10 1 2


Edited by Hip, 09 March 2020 - 12:18 AM.

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#70 lancebr

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Posted 09 March 2020 - 12:42 AM

 

 

 

Interesting, would you have any links or references for that? 

 

If a cytokine storm is the cause of death in COVID-19 coronavirus infections, it's odd this virus should kill the old and the weak. In the case of the 1918 Spanish flu pandemic, which killed an estimated 50 million people worldwide, it was usually the young and healthy that died, whereas the old and weak tended to survive Spanish flu.

 

The theory of the Spanish flu is that if you are old and have a weaker immune system, then the cytokine response may be less, so less chance of having a tissue-damaging cytokine storm.

 

 

 

 

That information came from a link that was posted, earlier in this thread, by another poster

 

 

http://en.people.cn/...00-9665722.html

 

 



#71 Adaptogen

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Posted 09 March 2020 - 03:54 AM

Selfhacked has a good primer on ways to inhibit IL-6. ( selfhack.com/blog/interleukin-6/ )

Egcg, black seed oil, spirulina, quercetin, fish oil, hydroxytyrosol (olive leaf extract) are all commonly available household supplements. But of course, taking anything that modulates immune response when having a potentially deadly infection is playing dice, so self-medicate at your own risk.

It's strange to me that it purportedly acceptable to take things like astragalus, elderberry, and reishi before contracting, as they have preventative effects for infection, but should cease consumption after contracting the illness. Does that not mean that there is an appropriate time for elevated IL-6? On the other hand, wouldn't it follow that things like spirulina, curcumin, egcg, quercetin, etc should not be taken until you have contracted the virus, because they would be downregulating IL-6 as your body's innate defense?

Edited by Adaptogen, 09 March 2020 - 03:56 AM.

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#72 Dorian Grey

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Posted 09 March 2020 - 05:04 AM

Very good point Adaptogen.  This disease seems to have two distinctly different pathways.  Cold/flu like symptoms that last for around a week; then either recovery or progression to cytokine storm?  Or is it uncontrolled viral progression / immune response failure that leads to terminal phase?  

 

This bug seems to hate oldsters, and I've read much about "immunosenescence" in geriatric populations preventing them from mounting an appropriate immune response to flu/pneumonia etc.  With the Spanish flu, cytokine storm occurred predominantly in youthful population.  

 

A wrong guess on which way to treat this disease (cytokine suppression or immune stimulation) would be most unfortunate.  Let's see if we can figure out the proper pathway to recovery!  



#73 lancebr

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Posted 09 March 2020 - 05:24 AM

Selfhacked has a good primer on ways to inhibit IL-6. ( selfhack.com/blog/interleukin-6/ )

Egcg, black seed oil, spirulina, quercetin, fish oil, hydroxytyrosol (olive leaf extract) are all commonly available household supplements. But of course, taking anything that modulates immune response when having a potentially deadly infection is playing dice, so self-medicate at your own risk.

It's strange to me that it purportedly acceptable to take things like astragalus, elderberry, and reishi before contracting, as they have preventative effects for infection, but should cease consumption after contracting the illness. Does that not mean that there is an appropriate time for elevated IL-6? On the other hand, wouldn't it follow that things like spirulina, curcumin, egcg, quercetin, etc should not be taken until you have contracted the virus, because they would be downregulating IL-6 as your body's innate defense?

 

That is what I understand about elderberry.  It is suppose to be good to take as a preventative measure but once you

get the virus then it can be counterproductive. 

 

From literature that I have read it does seem like there is a time frame when you would want have certain cytokines elevated

to hopefully prevent the virus from replicating and taking hold in your system, but once you got it then you would want to

no longer elevate those cytokines if the virus was causing a cytokine storm.

 

The Qingfei Paidu Soup, that was supposedly used in China with good results, has some herbs that are easily obtained

and seem to have some good qualities for the use against this virus.

 

This literature pertaining to the use of alternative medicines with influenza and H5N1 has some interesting information.

 

https://www.ncbi.nlm...les/PMC2892358/

 

Licorice Root is one of the herbs in the soup that is being used in China. The following is information from the above report:

 

"Glycyrrhizin, an active component of liquorice roots, when given to mice from one day before infection with influenza

virus (H2N2), protected all treated mice from fatality while all control mice died (33). What is most interesting about this result

is that glycyrrhizin binds to, and inactivates, the novel pro-inflammatory mediator High Mobility Group Box 1 protein (HMGB1) (34),

which is elevated in the serum of sepsis patients who succumbed to infection"

 

The above report also noted that green tea reduces the release of HMGB1 if taken regularly:

 

"Green tea (Camellia sinensis) reduces endotoxin-induced release of HMGB1 and is also proposed to possess the ability to

decrease mortality from sepsis if taken regularly (57)."

 

To be honest it is hard to know which herbs or supplement would be the best to use to fight this Covid19, but of the herbs

from that soup they used in China it had three that are easily obtained (licorice root, skullcap, and ginger). So I am at least going

to have a supply of those three on hand if needed since they have been somewhat tested toward this Covid19.

 

 



#74 lancebr

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Posted 09 March 2020 - 05:37 AM

Very good point Adaptogen.  This disease seems to have two distinctly different pathways.  Cold/flu like symptoms that last for around a week; then either recovery or progression to cytokine storm?  Or is it uncontrolled viral progression / immune response failure that leads to terminal phase?  

 

This bug seems to hate oldsters, and I've read much about "immunosenescence" in geriatric populations preventing them from mounting an appropriate immune response to flu/pneumonia etc.  With the Spanish flu, cytokine storm occurred predominantly in youthful population.  

 

A wrong guess on which way to treat this disease (cytokine suppression or immune stimulation) would be most unfortunate.  Let's see if we can figure out the proper pathway to recovery!  

 

That is one of the biggest dilemmas with this virus is knowing if should try cytokine suppression or immune stimulation.

It is a 50/50 chance either way and the wrong choice could be deadly.

 

I did see a local news show over the weekend where they were talking with a doctor and one of the questions that was asked

was why are children not being as impacted with this as adults and the elderly.  His thought, which he said would need to be studied

to know for sure, was that children's immune systems are not fully mature like adults and so they don't overreact to the virus

causing the excessive damage to the body. It sounds plausible but who really knows since this is such a new virus.

 

All of the information I have read that has come from China...they seem to mention about the increase of IL-6 and inflammatory

damage and scarring lesions to the lungs.

 

And here is what one MD from NYU thinks about the situation:

 

“There may be an enormous evolutionary advantage for young people to have higher levels of ‘immune tolerance’ to viruses,

meaning that they may get mildly sick but their immune systems don’t go into overdrive mode in trying to control them,” shared

Ellie Carmody MD MPH, Assistant Professor, Division of Infectious Diseases at NYU Langone Health. Dr Carmody called this

the “‘Goldilocks phenomenon,’ where in younger people, the immune response is ‘just right’ where in older people, it is

disregulated and either too strong or too weak."

 

So if that is the situation that it is due to disregulated immune response then how do you know what to do...increase the immune

response or decrease it so you dont get a cytokine storm.

 

 


Edited by lancebr, 09 March 2020 - 05:49 AM.


#75 Dorian Grey

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Posted 09 March 2020 - 06:15 AM

That is one of the biggest dilemmas with this virus is knowing if should try cytokine suppression or immune stimulation.

It is a 50/50 chance either way and the wrong choice could be deadly.

 

I did see a local news show over the weekend where they were talking with a doctor and one of the questions that was asked

was why are children not being as impacted with this as adults and the elderly.  His thought, which he said would need to be studied

to know for sure, was that children's immune systems are not fully mature like adults and so they don't overreact to the virus

causing the excessive damage to the body. It sounds plausible but who really knows since this is such a new virus.

 

All of the information I have read that has come from China...they seem to mention about the increase of IL-6 and inflammatory

damage and scarring lesions to the lungs.

 

And here is what one MD from NYU thinks about the situation:

 

“There may be an enormous evolutionary advantage for young people to have higher levels of ‘immune tolerance’ to viruses,

meaning that they may get mildly sick but their immune systems don’t go into overdrive mode in trying to control them,” shared

Ellie Carmody MD MPH, Assistant Professor, Division of Infectious Diseases at NYU Langone Health. Dr Carmody called this

the “‘Goldilocks phenomenon,’ where in younger people, the immune response is ‘just right’ where in older people, it is

disregulated and either too strong or too weak."

 

 

So if that is the situation that it is due to disregulated immune response then how do you know what to do...increase the immune

response or decrease it so you dont get a cytokine storm.

 

The autopsy findings (links on previous post) may (or may not) hold some clues.  Extreme markers of inflammation and excessive and very thick mucus.  Perhaps instead of modulating immunity, a focus on reducing inflammation (aspirin?) and preventing thickening of mucus (humidification/mucolytics?) might be wise?  



#76 HBRU

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Posted 09 March 2020 - 06:29 AM

At the beginning of the infection (when not visible) immunostimulation... then switch to immunomodulatory stuffs (omega3+aspirin is the most effective and easy to get)... I trust in BHT... It works for enveloped viruses... should be taken while infection is silent just to slow down it and let the immunitary system have time to see the virus and react. I think also TUDCA is usefull....

#77 HBRU

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Posted 09 March 2020 - 06:31 AM

Also NAC looks interesting but when infection get a bit hard and creates mucus and a lot of oxidative stress.

#78 lancebr

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Posted 09 March 2020 - 06:40 AM

The autopsy findings (links on previous post) may (or may not) hold some clues.  Extreme markers of inflammation and excessive and very thick mucus.  Perhaps instead of modulating immunity, a focus on reducing inflammation (aspirin?) and preventing thickening of mucus (humidification/mucolytics?) might be wise?  

 

If you were taking aspirin in a situation like this what dosage do you think would be good to control

the inflammation but also allow the fever to fight the infection?

 

 



#79 HBRU

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Posted 09 March 2020 - 06:48 AM

Classical 80 mg... but i'm not a doctor, see your doctor, ask him... Aspirin may create problems.
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#80 Adaptogen

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Posted 09 March 2020 - 08:42 AM

The Role of Interleukin 6 During Viral Infections

 

Immunomodulation is far from simple, and the above article makes it clear that IL-6 plays a variable role in infections, and is both necessary for and potentially deleterious to overcoming viruses. "IL-6 has been shown to be essential for survival of mice infected with influenza virus by promoting optimal regulation of the T-cell response, inflammatory resolution, tissue remodeling promoting lung repair, migration and phagocytic activities of macrophages, preventing viral-induced apoptosis in lung epithelial cells, and regulation of IgG isotype switching (Lauder et al., 2013; Yang et al., 2017)"

 

I think it would be unwise for anyone to assume that fighting a cytokine storm is as easy as just taking aspirin and fish oil. In fact, are trivial herbal reducers of IL-6 even worth considering?  I'm not sure that you would want to consume substances that lower IL-6 until the actual onset of cytokine release syndrome. If you get to the point where you truly have CRS and need intervention for your elevated IL-6, CRP, excessive inflammation, and imminent lung damage, you should already be in the hospital, not self medicating with supplements.

 

Most medicinal plants function in far more complicated ways than something as easy to pin down as nfkb inhibitor or immunostimulant, so who really knows, there may still be reason to take or not take anything, including elderberry, echinachea, etc. The only obvious point at which it appears you do not want to take IL-6 stimulants is when cytokine release syndrome occurs. But no one can say for certain that reishi, astragalus, elderberry, or other herbs would make this occurrence more likely or even more severe, or that they would worsen the outcome or likelihood of survival considering the multifaceted MOAs of different medicinal herbs.

 

China did recently approve IL-6 binding inhibitor Actemra (Tocilizumab) for coronavirus induced complications, I'd be curious to know at what stage of the disease they decide to give it to patients. I imagine it is only given once CRS has been well demonstrated and patients are showing not just excessively elevated IL-6, but also other clinical manifestations necessitating intervention.


Edited by Adaptogen, 09 March 2020 - 08:44 AM.

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#81 HBRU

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Posted 09 March 2020 - 10:18 AM

Mostly an elderly problem... Senesent cells...

Attached Files


Edited by HBRU, 09 March 2020 - 10:19 AM.


#82 izan82

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Posted 09 March 2020 - 12:51 PM

Asthma drug seems effective for COVID-19 pneumonia

 

Ciclesonide (Brand name = Alvesco)

 

Japanese doctors say an asthma drug appears to be effective in reducing symptoms of coronavirus patients who developed pneumonia.

A medical team at Ashigarakami hospital in Kanagawa Prefecture treated patients who became ill aboard the Diamond Princess cruise ship. They have announced the results of their study on the Japanese Association for Infectious Diseases' website.

Their report says three patients were given an asthma drug called Ciclesonide, a steroid inhalant to suppress the immune system.

The medical team said the patients were all over 65 years of age and had oxygen support, but were not in serious condition.
The research shows that the patients were given Ciclesonide on February 20 and their health improved in about two days. A 73-year-old woman is said to have been discharged.

The doctors say they used the drug after receiving information about it from the National Institute of Infectious Diseases.

They say the drug reaches the lungs where the virus is multiplying so it could be effective in reducing inflammation there.

The medical team plans to investigate the effectiveness of the treatment jointly with other medical institutions because they treated only a small number of patients.

 

https://www3.nhk.or....ws/20200303_20/

 


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#83 Kalliste

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Posted 09 March 2020 - 01:15 PM

https://www.macleans...virus-outbreak/

 

 

 

Fifteen years ago, a medical researcher named Michel Chrétien and his longtime collaborator Majambu Mbikay, a Congolese scientist, unhatched a theory in their Montreal laboratory. In the aftermath of the SARS epidemic that infected 8,000 patients in 26 countries, Chrétien and Mbikay, researchers at the Clinical Research Institute of Montreal (IRCM), began testing their idea that a derivative of quercetin, a plant compound known to help lower cholesterol and treat inflammatory disease—and common, at low doses, in over-the-counter medication—was a “broad spectrum” antiviral drug that could fight a range of viruses.

When an Ebola outbreak struck West Africa in 2014, the two scientists teamed up with the National Microbiology Laboratory in Winnipeg to test quercetin’s effectiveness on mice infected with Ebola—and found it effective even when administered only minutes before infection. It still needs to undergo clinical trials.

 



#84 lancebr

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Posted 09 March 2020 - 04:12 PM

Asthma drug seems effective for COVID-19 pneumonia

 

Ciclesonide (Brand name = Alvesco)

 

Japanese doctors say an asthma drug appears to be effective in reducing symptoms of coronavirus patients who developed pneumonia.

A medical team at Ashigarakami hospital in Kanagawa Prefecture treated patients who became ill aboard the Diamond Princess cruise ship. They have announced the results of their study on the Japanese Association for Infectious Diseases' website.

Their report says three patients were given an asthma drug called Ciclesonide, a steroid inhalant to suppress the immune system.

The medical team said the patients were all over 65 years of age and had oxygen support, but were not in serious condition.
The research shows that the patients were given Ciclesonide on February 20 and their health improved in about two days. A 73-year-old woman is said to have been discharged.

The doctors say they used the drug after receiving information about it from the National Institute of Infectious Diseases.

They say the drug reaches the lungs where the virus is multiplying so it could be effective in reducing inflammation there.

The medical team plans to investigate the effectiveness of the treatment jointly with other medical institutions because they treated only a small number of patients.

 

https://www3.nhk.or....ws/20200303_20/

 

 

So for the ones who got pneumonia they used an inhaled corticosteroid that had "the inhibition of, or reduction in, levels of pro-inflammatory

mediators, such as cytokines."  So it appears to be on the same belief of suppressing the cytokines. 

 

One advantage of using this type of inhaled drug is that it has"low systemic bioavailability and therefore has a low potential to produce

systemic adverse events."

 



#85 lancebr

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Posted 09 March 2020 - 07:09 PM

I just heard another theory as to why they think that this virus might not be as potent toward children

compared to that of adults. 

 

Supposedly, children have adequate supplies of protein in their cells causing their body to not grab onto

the protein hook that is offered by the virus.  Since their body does not readily grab onto the protein hook

of the virus they do not suffer as drastic symptoms.

 

Elderly individuals do "have a much higher rate of protein catabolism and a harder time utilizing proteins, which

can create a protein deficiency for the body"

 

Does this sound like a plausible theory?

 

 


Edited by lancebr, 09 March 2020 - 07:27 PM.

  • unsure x 1

#86 Oakman

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Posted 09 March 2020 - 09:06 PM

I'm not seeing anyone mentioning "Mannose-binding Lectins" as, "A method of inhibiting a viral infection of a host comprising administering to the host an anti-viral griffithsin polypeptide comprising SEQ ID NO: 3 or a fragment thereof comprising at least eight contiguous amino acids, a nucleic acid encoding the anti-viral polypeptide, or an antibody to the anti-viral polypeptide. A method of inhibiting a virus in a sample comprising contacting the sample with an anti-viral griffithsin polypeptide or antibody thereto also is provided."

 

Seems like griffithsinas, is patentedApplication filed by US Department of Health and Human Services (HHS), by our very own government, but not commercialized.

 

https://plantmedicin...an-coronavirus/

 

https://www.plantmed...ne-mannose.html


  • Informative x 1

#87 izan82

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Posted 09 March 2020 - 09:33 PM

children have full intact thymus glands.



#88 lancebr

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Posted 09 March 2020 - 11:15 PM

I'm not seeing anyone mentioning "Mannose-binding Lectins" as, "A method of inhibiting a viral infection of a host comprising administering to the host an anti-viral griffithsin polypeptide comprising SEQ ID NO: 3 or a fragment thereof comprising at least eight contiguous amino acids, a nucleic acid encoding the anti-viral polypeptide, or an antibody to the anti-viral polypeptide. A method of inhibiting a virus in a sample comprising contacting the sample with an anti-viral griffithsin polypeptide or antibody thereto also is provided."

 

Seems like griffithsinas, is patentedApplication filed by US Department of Health and Human Services (HHS), by our very own government, but not commercialized.

 

https://plantmedicin...an-coronavirus/

 

https://www.plantmed...ne-mannose.html

 

I saw some articles pertaining to the mannose-binding lectins and its impact on viruses.

 

One question I have is I know that some women take the D-mannose supplement to combat

urinary tract infections. 

 

Is this D-mannose supplement something that will have a bearing on the mannose-binding lectiins, and does

taking this supplement put them in even more danger for more serious complications if they catch the virus?

 

Thanks


Edited by lancebr, 09 March 2020 - 11:28 PM.


#89 Oakman

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Posted 10 March 2020 - 02:14 AM

I saw some articles pertaining to the mannose-binding lectins and its impact on viruses.

 

One question I have is I know that some women take the D-mannose supplement to combat

urinary tract infections. 

 

Is this D-mannose supplement something that will have a bearing on the mannose-binding lectiins, and does

taking this supplement put them in even more danger for more serious complications if they catch the virus?

 

Thanks

I have no idea about what taking D-Mannose would do, but it doesn't sound promising in this context. Perhaps she should look for an alternative treatment?


  • Disagree x 1

#90 hamishm00

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Posted 10 March 2020 - 07:30 AM

I am ramping up beta glucans in the light of the corona epidemic. Some interesting posts from Ergo-log which might be of interest to longecity folks: 

 

https://www.ergo-log...om-glucans.html

 

https://www.ergo-log...infections.html

 

Also spirulina seems promising:

 

https://www.ergo-log...-inhibitor.html

 

 


  • Informative x 1





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