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PAYWALLED: Calorie restriction improves aging-induced impairment of cognitive function in relation to deregulation ...

aging brain regional gaba calorie restriction corticosterone cognitive function

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#1 Engadin

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Posted 28 April 2020 - 11:10 PM


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F U L L   T I T L E :   Calorie restriction improves aging-induced impairment of cognitive function in relation to deregulation of brain regional GABA system and corticosterone status.

 

S O U R C E :   Science Direct / ELSEVIER / Mechanisms of Ageing and Development 

 

 

 

 

 

Highlights

 
  •  Aging deregulates cognitive function, brain regional GABA and corticosterone.
 
  •  Calorie restricted (CR) diet improves these aging-induced deregulations.
 
  •  Longer period of CR diet supplementation produces greater effect.
 
  •  CR diet consumption is harmful to young rats in those parameters.
 
 
 
Abstract
 
Aging is known to affect adversely the corticosterone status and the brain function including cognition. Calorie restricted (CR) diet has been found to reduce stress factors and improve brain aging. The objective of the present investigation is to study the effect of short-term CR diet without any food deprivation on aging-induced impairment of cognitive function in relation to the corticosterone status and the brain regional GABA system. The result showed that aging-induced deregulation of the brain regional GABA system, increase in plasma and adrenal corticosterone levels and cognitive impairment were attenuated with short-term CR diet supplementation for consecutive 1 and 2 months to the aged (18 and 24 months) rats. But in young rats (4 months) consumption of the same CR diet under similar conditions reversibly affected those above-mentioned parameters.
 
These results, thus suggest that (a) aging down-regulates brain regional GABA system with an up-regulation of corticosterone status and impairment of cognitive function, (b) CR diet consumption improves this aging-induced deregulation of brain regional GABA system, corticosterone status, and cognitive function, © these attenuating effects of CR diet are greater with a longer period of consumption and (d) CR diet consumption is harmful to those above-mentioned parameters in young rats.
 
 
 
Abbreviations
 
ACTH: adrenocorticotropic hormone
ANOVA: analysis of variance
BDNF: brain-derived neurotrophic factor
BSA: bovine serum albumin
CA1: cornu ammonis 1 (Hippocampal subfield)
CC: Cerebral cortex
CNS: Central nervous system
CR: calorie restriction
CRH: corticotrophin releasing hormone
EDTA: Ethylene diamine tetra acetic acid
EOS: Ethanolamine-O-sulphate
FeCl3: Ferric chloride
GABA: gamma-aminobutyric acid
GABA-T: GABA-transaminase
GAD: Glutamate decarboxylase
GDH: Glutamate dehydrogenase
GS: Glutamine synthetase
HCl: Hydrochloric acid
HI: Hippocampu
HPA: Hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenocortical
HY: Hypothalamus
H2SO4: Sulfuric acid
IAEC: Institutional animal ethical committeeI
CMR: Indian council of medical research
IGF: Insulin-like growth factor
MBTH: 3-methyl-2-benzo-thiazoline-2-hydrazonem
RNA: messenger RNA
mTOR: mammalian target of rapamycin
NaNO2: Sodium nitrite
PALPO: Pyridoxal-5′-phosphate
PM: Pons-medulla
PVN: paraventricular nucleus
REM: rapid eye movement
SIRT1: Sirtuin1
TCA: Tricarboxylic acid
 
 
TEXT SCHEME:
 
1. Introduction
2. Materials and methods
2.1. Materials
2.2. Animals, animal maintenance and care
2.3. Experimental design
2.4. Collection of brain regions
2.5. Estimation of biochemical parameters
2.5.1. The steady-state level of the brain regional GABA, glutamate, and glutamine
2.5.2. Estimation of the brain regional GAD and GABA-T activity
2.5.3. Estimation of the brain regional EOS-induced GABA accumulation rate
2.5.4. Estimation of corticosterone level from plasma and adrenal gland
2.5.5. Estimation of tissue protein
2.6. Behavioral study
2.6.1. Assessment of cognitive function
2.7. Statistical analysis
3. Results
3.1. Effect of CR diet on aging-induced changes in brain regional biochemical parameters
3.1.1. Steady-state levels of GABA, glutamate, and glutamine
3.1.2. Brain regional GABA/glutamate and glutamate/glutamine ratios
3.1.3. Activities of GABA-metabolizing enzymes (GAD and GABA-T)
3.1.4. EOS-induced GABA accumulation rate
3.2. Effect of CR diet on aging-induced changes in plasma and adrenal corticosterone levels
3.3. CR diet recovers aging-induced decrease in cognitive function
4. Discussion
5. Conclusion
 
 
 
 
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Also tagged with one or more of these keywords: aging, brain regional gaba, calorie restriction, corticosterone, cognitive function

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