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Magnesium body & brain store

magnesium

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#1 lemon_

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Posted 10 August 2020 - 11:39 AM


Questions:

When we take Magnesium supplements is there a increase of mg to our body stores so when we stop taking the mg there is a positive effect

When we take magnesium supplements does that mean more mg can pass the bbb?

 

While researching this I came across a study examining mg citrate;malate;acetyl taurate;glycinate and how different types of magnesium depending on the dose can increase and decrease in different parts of the body.

 

 

However, in both studies, we observed that the brain rapidly took up magnesium, then magnesium levels was decreased at other tissues, such as muscle, to preserve the levels of magnesium in the blood[8]

 

When magnesium is given at low doses, there seems to be a slight trend towards decreasing of magnesium (statistically not
significant) in the tissues. Cells make an effort to maintain a negative electrochemical load within the cell [25, 26]. Apart
from the passive transition and active transport, secondary active transport mechanisms also work in magnesium transitions inside and outside of cells [26]. Passive transition with a concentration gradient at high doses seems to be more dominant than the active transition. However, at lower doses, the active mechanisms may be more dominant and may have made magnesium efflux in the first 24 h in an effort to maintain intracellular negativity.
 
 
Brain magnesium levels (mg/gr tissue)
Fig. 4 Brain tissue magnesium levels with high dose and divided dose. *p <0.05 compared to control group. M magnesium malate, AT magnesium acetyl taurate, G magnesium glycinate, C magnesium citrate, 45 45 mg/ 70 kg dose, 135 135 mg/70 kg dose, 405 405 mg/70 kg dose
Attached File  Capture5.PNG   523.16KB   0 downloads
 

Document one

Attached File  Dose-Dependent Absorption Profile of Different Magnesium Compounds.pdf   968.37KB   2 downloads

 

 

Attached File  Capture555.PNG   230.54KB   0 downloads

 

Attached File  Bioavailability of Magnesium Compounds.pdf   1.33MB   0 downloads

...The aim of this study is to investigate the bioavailability of five different magnesium compounds (magnesium sulfate, magnesium oxide, magnesium acetyl taurate, magnesium citrate, and magnesium malate) in different tissues. Following a single dose 400 mg/70 kg magnesium administration to Sprague Dawley rats, bioavailability was evaluated by examining time-dependent absorption, tissue penetration, and the effects on the behavior of the animals. Pharmacokinetically, the area under the curve calculation is highest in the magnesium malate. The magnesium acetyl taurate was found to have the second highest area under the curve calculation. Magnesium acetyl taurate was rapidly absorbed, able to pass through to the brain easily, had the highest tissue concentration level in the brain, and was found to be associated with decreased anxiety indicators. Magnesium malate levels remained high for an extended period of time in the serum. The commonly prescribed dietary supplements magnesium oxide and magnesium citrate had the lowest bioavailability when compared to our control group. More research is needed to investigate the bioavailability of magnesium malate and acetyl taurate compounds and their effects in specific tissues and on behavior.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Magnesium Basics:
https://www.ncbi.nlm...les/PMC4455825/

 

60% of magnesium is stored in bone. Bone forms our most important stocks of magnesium and the body can call on two thirds of these stores (as 45% of the total reserves) if need be. 40% migrates into soft tissue, principally muscles and organs.

 

Magnesium is the second most frequently occurring intracellular cation and is found mainly in the cells.     

 

Extracellular,  i.e. in the interstitial fluid between the cells,  and in blood serum, only 1% of magnesium is to be found. The major part is ionized and therefore pharmacologically active and a smaller portion is bound to other substances, to citrate, for example.
The nominal value for magnesium reserves within the body is approximately  24 to 28 grams.
Magnesium is excreted via the intestines and the kidneys:
 
Source: bhttps://www.exatest.com/minerals.htm

 
 

 


Edited by cardsk, 10 August 2020 - 12:38 PM.


#2 lemon_

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Posted 10 August 2020 - 01:11 PM

...The aim of this study is to investigate the bioavailability of five different magnesium compounds (magnesium sulfate, magnesium oxide, magnesium acetyl taurate, magnesium citrate, and magnesium malate) in different tissues. 
 
The magnesium acetyl taurate was found to have the second highest area under the curve calculation. Magnesium acetyl taurate was rapidly absorbed, able to pass through to the brain easily, had the highest tissue concentration level in the brain, and was found to be associated with decreased anxiety indicators. Magnesium malate levels remained high for an extended period of time in the serum. .......
Attached File  Capture555.PNG   230.54KB   0 downloads

Attached File  Magnesium Bioavailability Compounds.pdf   1.33MB   1 downloads
 
 
1 Behavioral tests results and tissue and blood magnesium levels in 8 h OF

Time spend inmiddle area (sec)
T-maze Time spend open arms (sec) Blood Mg (mg/dL) Muscle Mg (mg/g tissue)                Brain Mg (mg/g tissue)
Control 5.2 ± 0.2 8.8 ± 1.6 3.3 ± 0.5 327.4 ± 1.4        189.3 ± 1.6
MgSO4 6.3 ± 0.6 38.6 ± 5.6** 3.4 ± 0.3 328.5 ± 2      178.6 ± 3.7
MgAT 11.4 ± 2.1* 39.8 ± 5.5* 3.1 ± 0.7 296.9 ± 8.8*   216.9 ± 2.9*
MgO 5.3 ± 0.7 8.0 ± 0.8 3.2 ± 0.7 326.2 ± 3.4            182.9 ± 1.5
MgC 3.8 ± 0.4 23.2 ± 2.9 3.4 ± 1.1 324.9 ± 2.5          198.8 ± 7.1
MgM 10.0 ± 1.1 21.9 ± 2.5 3.7 ± 0.8* 333.4 ± 5.6      180.6 ± 3.9

 
 

Fig. 4 Tissue magnesium levels.
a Brain tissue magnesium levels.
b Muscle tissue magnesium
levels. Asterisks indicate p < 0.05
compared to other groups.
MgSO4 magnesium sulfate, MgT
magnesium acetyl taurate, MgO
magnesium oxide, MgC
magnesium citrate, MgM
magnesium malate

 
0aHPx6N.png


Edited by cardsk, 10 August 2020 - 01:21 PM.


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#3 lemon_

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Posted 10 August 2020 - 01:57 PM

Can anyone explain the dialog above, why did the magnetism taurate increase mg brain levels but decrease mg in muscles tissues.?. Would the decreased magnesium in the muscles increase over time or would supplementing other types of magnesium combined with the taurate negative this effect? or am I misunderstanding something(please see pdf)



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#4 pamojja

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Posted 12 August 2020 - 11:41 AM

I developed a serious Mg-deficiency, most probably by raising serum Vitamin D levels up to therapeutic levels, and Mg being a co-factor raising its demand. Thereby pushing a probably since many years subclinical Mg-deficiency into very severe.

 

Main symptom were very painful muscle-cramps, which no amount of supplementation seemed to cease. Only found above a certain threshold of intake, about 2 g/d of elemental oral Mg, the cramps were somewhat alleviated. First I tried all better bioavailable forms of Mg for years (malate, glycinate, taurate, ysinate, threonate, citrate, ascorbate...), but after reading niners post from 7 years ago I also added Mg-oxide. And found for me there was indeed no difference, only the total amount of oral elemental Mg was what alleviated the cramps somewhat.

 

Finally could get a GP to give me inexpensive almost monthly Mg-sulfate IVs 3 years ago. After its 6th the muscle cramps ceased, after the 10 whole blood magnesium test showed levels increased from its lowest 29.9 mg/l up to 32.8 (34-36 normal range). However, after the 18th IV still only 32.4 mg/l again. Serum Mg all the while never showed deficient. But after the 22nd IV this spring got it tested already 1 week after the infusion, and surprisingly for the first time all these years showed even below normal.

 

So there seem to be very paradoxical effects, especially in deficiency and trying to replete. I can in my case only explain by the overabundance through IVs the triaging stoped at a certain point, starting to refill long neglected bone-stores, and thereby decreasing whole-blood levels again. Or even for the first time serum levels.

 

 

60% of magnesium is stored in bone. Bone forms our most important stocks of magnesium and the body can call on two thirds of these stores (as 45% of the total reserves) if need be. 40% migrates into soft tissue, principally muscles and organs.

 

The nominal value for magnesium reserves within the body is approximately  24 to 28 grams.

 

The other paper you posted says only 1/3 of bone-stores could be mobilized in deficiency. However, with my now 26th IV, got in total already 12.48g of elemental Mg infused. Beside the in average 1.75 g/d of oral elemental Mg during the last 11 years (which only prevented worst, but didn't with further declining blood/serum Mg).

 

 

Can anyone explain the dialog above, why did the magnetism taurate increase mg brain levels but decrease mg in muscles tissues.?

 

From my experience I can only guess that depending on preconditions, anything could be possible.







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