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OS-1 and OneSkin

skin rejuvenation

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#1 reason

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Posted 06 November 2020 - 08:07 PM


You might recall that OneSkin recently launched a cosmetic product claimed to reduce levels of senescent cells in aged skin, as measured by the usual markers for cellular senescence, such as p16 expression and senescence-associated β-galactosidase. Removal of senescent cells is more or less literal rejuvenation, given that the accumulation of such cells drives chronic inflammation, tissue dysfunction, and degenerative aging. Clearance of a large fraction of senescent cells via senolytic drugs has been shown to extend life and turn back measures of aging in a number of animal studies.

The OneSkin product contains a bunch of the usual things one puts into skin care products, all of which can be safely ignored, but the core of it is peptide 14, also called OS-01 and decapeptide-52. This may or may not be a senolytic compound, capable of selectively destroying senescent cells to some degree. The evidence presented in today's preprint paper suggests that the observed effect on markers of cellular senescence is more likely achieved by preventing at least some cells from entering the senescent state.

In this, the use of peptide 14 might be similar in outcome to the topical application of rapamycin. In that case, researchers are fairly confident that no direct destruction of senescent cells is taking place, only a reduction in senescent cell creation and activity. This can be enough in aged skin to allow existing processes of senescent cell clearance to catch up over a timescale of a few months, and meaningful reduce the number of these errant cells and their impact on tissue function. Interestingly, the OneSkin folk used rapamycin as a positive control, and found it worsened aspects of their skin models even as it lowered markers of cellular senescence - so perhaps not something to dive into until more data has accumulated.

Looking at the meat of the data in this preprint, peptide 14 performs as well or better than topical rapamycin in reducing markers of cellular senescence, at least in skin models and in skin biopsies taken from older volunteers. Formal trials and resulting human data are pending - though the product is available for anyone who wants to give it a try. Given the existing data, it will be interesting to see how the product performs in older people in comparison to topical rapamycin use.

Senotherapeutic peptide reduces skin biological age and improves skin health markers

Skin aging has been primarily related to aesthetics and beauty. Therefore, interventions have focused on reestablishing skin appearance, but not necessarily skin health, function, and resilience. Recently, cellular senescence was shown to play a role in age-related skin function deterioration and influence organismal health and, potentially, longevity.

In the present study, a two-step screening was performed to identify peptides capable of reducing cellular senescence in human dermal fibroblasts (HDF) from Hutchinson-Gilford Progeria (HGPS) patients. From the top four peptides of the first round of screening, we built a 764-peptide library using amino acid scanning, of which the second screen led to the identification of peptide 14. Peptide 14 effectively decreased HDF senescence induced by HGPS, chronological aging, ultraviolet-B radiation, and etoposide treatment, without inducing significant cell death, and likely by modulating longevity and senescence pathways.

We further validated the effectiveness of peptide 14 using human skin equivalents and skin biopsies, where peptide 14 promoted skin health and reduced senescent cell markers, as well as the biological age of samples, according to the Skin-Specific DNA methylation clock, MolClock. Topical application of peptide 14 outperformed Retinol treatment, the current gold-standard in "anti-aging" skin care. Finally, we determined that peptide 14 is safe for long-term applications and also significantly extends both the lifespan and healthspan of C. elegans worms tested in two independent testings. This highlights the potential for geroprotective applications of the senotherapeutic compounds identified using our screening platform beyond the skin.


View the full article at FightAging

#2 Mind

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Posted 25 February 2021 - 04:53 PM

If someone can find the other thread about OneSkin (not the interview), let me know, perhaps we can merge them.

 

I used OneSkin for about a month and a half, one one hand but not the other.

 

Look at the picture and tell me if you notice a difference. Does one hand look "younger" or "better" (better color or less wrinkles)

 

I tried to take the picture in good light and balanced between the hands.


Looking at the picture. I think I can do better. Need a higher-res picture. Coming soon.

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#3 motorcitykid

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Posted 26 February 2021 - 05:57 AM

Epidermis on ring-less fingered hand appears smoother w/ less fine wrinkles.


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#4 Mind

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Posted 26 February 2021 - 04:52 PM

Here is a better more high resolution picture, where you can zoom and see more detail.

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#5 mike_nyc

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Posted 26 February 2021 - 05:03 PM

Looks great.  It is a noticeable difference.  I just got some and am excited to try it.  


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#6 Qowpel

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Posted 28 February 2021 - 12:08 PM

Here is a better more high resolution picture, where you can zoom and see more detail.

Nice difference I can see it. Have you cnsidered supplementing allicin? It makes my skin look like porcelain somehow



#7 bosharpe

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Posted 07 March 2021 - 02:45 PM

I can't see a massive difference to tell you the truth. Could be my imagination but your right hand (on the left) seems in a little better condition.



#8 Mind

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Posted 07 March 2021 - 09:27 PM

I agree, there is not a big difference. I am going to continue applying on only one hand to see if the difference is more noticeable over time.



#9 bosharpe

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Posted 10 March 2021 - 10:30 AM

Yeah, didn't they say it's sort of like retinol. Retinol take months to peak in terms of benefits. 



#10 Mind

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Posted 10 March 2021 - 04:01 PM

Yeah, didn't they say it's sort of like retinol. Retinol take months to peak in terms of benefits. 

 

I think they have said that Retinol is the only thing that comes close to the action of OS-1.



#11 genereader

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Posted 22 April 2021 - 09:24 PM

The evidence presented in today's preprint paper suggests that the observed effect on markers of cellular senescence is more likely achieved by preventing at least some cells from entering the senescent state.

 

If it's preventing cells from entering senescence, might it increase the risk of cancer? 

 


Edited by genereader, 22 April 2021 - 09:26 PM.


#12 QuestforLife

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Posted 17 May 2021 - 11:46 AM

I think it is clear the ringless hand looks better. It is not a huge effect, but it is there.



#13 Castiel

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Posted 17 May 2021 - 09:42 PM

I think they have said that Retinol is the only thing that comes close to the action of OS-1.

Doesn't retinol accelerate cell turnover wouldn't that increase telomere shortening in the long run accelerating aging?

 

As for skin products I prefer not to use anything, only sun protector if needed, I think skin quality can be an indicator of internal aging rate

 

 

 

If you look younger than your age, your insides are probably younger too. 45 year-olds who age slower have better eyesight & hearing, more brain mass, walk faster, and LOOK younger. Gotta get more beauty sleep! -David Sinclair

https://twitter.com/...7887484932?s=20

 

If your diet and supplement regimen allows you to look significantly younger than your age without any skin cream or treatment, that is probably a good indicator you're doing something good.


Edited by Castiel, 17 May 2021 - 09:42 PM.

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#14 Mind

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Posted 17 May 2021 - 10:45 PM

Doesn't retinol accelerate cell turnover wouldn't that increase telomere shortening in the long run accelerating aging?

 

As for skin products I prefer not to use anything, only sun protector if needed, I think skin quality can be an indicator of internal aging rate

 

https://twitter.com/...7887484932?s=20

 

If your diet and supplement regimen allows you to look significantly younger than your age without any skin cream or treatment, that is probably a good indicator you're doing something good.

 

Many good points. I have always thought that if your methods to beat back aging are successful, then a good skin cream is like the icing on the cake. If you look in the mirror and look young-ish, I think that gives you a phycological lift, perhaps.

 

I like OneSkin, but I don't think it is good enough (not enough rejuvenation) to justify the cost - $100 per month. I am paying for a lot of ingredients that just make my skin fell good, but do not rejuvenate.


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#15 Castiel

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Posted 18 May 2021 - 12:42 AM

Many good points. I have always thought that if your methods to beat back aging are successful, then a good skin cream is like the icing on the cake. If you look in the mirror and look young-ish, I think that gives you a phycological lift, perhaps.

 

I like OneSkin, but I don't think it is good enough (not enough rejuvenation) to justify the cost - $100 per month. I am paying for a lot of ingredients that just make my skin fell good, but do not rejuvenate.

 

Yes, but not only is skin quality good to see how your regimen is doing.   It can also help gauge the effects of new additions or changes.    If your changes result in notable skin improvement, despite not necessarily targeting the skin, that seems like they may be promising changes.   Likewise if you drop something and skin quality worsens within days or months, that suggests that might not be such a promising thing to do.


Edited by Castiel, 18 May 2021 - 12:43 AM.

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#16 QuestforLife

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Posted 18 May 2021 - 06:20 AM

Yes, but not only is skin quality good to see how your regimen is doing. It can also help gauge the effects of new additions or changes. If your changes result in notable skin improvement, despite not necessarily targeting the skin, that seems like they may be promising changes. Likewise if you drop something and skin quality worsens within days or months, that suggests that might not be such a promising thing to do.


I don't totally disagree with you - a true rejuvenation internally should hopefully also deal with the skin, but equally skin improvements may also feed back and improve your internal state..remember the Atopalm study

Topical Applications of an Emollient Reduce Circulating Pro-Inflammatory
Cytokine Levels in Chronically Aged Humans: A Pilot Clinical Study

We also found significantly higher baseline levels of IL-1β, IL-6 and TNFα in aged vs. young humans (P < 0.001), as previously reported. Topical applications of the barrier repair emollient significantly enhanced epidermal permeability barrier function (P < 0.01) and stratum corneum hydration (P < 0.05). In parallel, circulating levels of IL-1β and IL-6 normalized, while TNFα levels declined substantially.

doi: 10.1111/jdv.15540


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#17 Adaptogen

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Posted 30 June 2021 - 09:46 AM

Did you continue your testing? Any updated comparison pictures?

#18 Mind

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Posted 30 June 2021 - 05:17 PM

I tapered off the application over the last couple of weeks. I only applied the OneSkin 3 times in the last two weeks, to see if the effects remained. I think there is still a minor difference in the hands. Does anyone else see a difference?

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#19 brian1965

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Posted 06 July 2021 - 11:06 PM

I tapered off the application over the last couple of weeks. I only applied the OneSkin 3 times in the last two weeks, to see if the effects remained. I think there is still a minor difference in the hands. Does anyone else see a difference?

 

To me, there is a clear, noticeable difference between your hands.  The ringless hand looks much smoother, with fewer wrinkles, especially on the main knuckles. 

 

Do you have a "before" picture of the ringless hand, by any chance?



#20 Mind

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Posted 07 July 2021 - 02:46 PM

You are correct. The ringless hand is the one that got the application of OneSkin.

 

Unfortunately, I did not take a "before" picture of the treatment hand. My bad.



#21 Daniel Cooper

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Posted 09 July 2021 - 01:36 PM

One thing to consider - if you live in the US and spend much time driving a car, everything on the left side of your body will be more photo damaged. Your left arm and hand and the left side of your face and neck. Since we drive on the right our left side is the "out" side when we're driving.

 

I can tell I have noticeably more photo damage on my left as opposed to my right, and I assume your ring is on your left hand.

 

 


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#22 Mind

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Posted 09 July 2021 - 02:38 PM

One thing to consider - if you live in the US and spend much time driving a car, everything on the left side of your body will be more photo damaged. Your left arm and hand and the left side of your face and neck. Since we drive on the right our left side is the "out" side when we're driving.

 

I can tell I have noticeably more photo damage on my left as opposed to my right, and I assume your ring is on your left hand.

 

Correct. Ring is on the left hand.



#23 brian1965

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Posted 09 July 2021 - 06:10 PM

One thing to consider - if you live in the US and spend much time driving a car, everything on the left side of your body will be more photo damaged. Your left arm and hand and the left side of your face and neck. Since we drive on the right our left side is the "out" side when we're driving.

 

I can tell I have noticeably more photo damage on my left as opposed to my right, and I assume your ring is on your left hand.

 

 

It's a good point. That's why before and after photos are always the best. Oddly, I'm in the US and have done my fair share of driving, but my right forearm has more and darker age spots than my left forearm.  So I'll give OneSkin a try for 2-3 months, see how it works. I've already taken the "before" pictures.  :)



#24 Mind

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Posted 10 July 2021 - 09:24 AM

It feels nice and it seems to have some minor skin rejuvenating effects, however, I don't think it is worth the cost. $100 per month for a product that is mostly NOT OS-1, is too expensive for me. I changed my subscription to getting 1 bottle every 3 months.



#25 brian1965

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Posted 12 July 2021 - 10:32 PM

It feels nice and it seems to have some minor skin rejuvenating effects, however, I don't think it is worth the cost. $100 per month for a product that is mostly NOT OS-1, is too expensive for me. I changed my subscription to getting 1 bottle every 3 months.

 

I agree, it is very expensive. I'm actually looking forward to another peptide-based lotion, the "blue gel" that Harold Katcher and Akshay Sanghvi should be releasing this month for $35 for a 1 month supply ( https://joshmitteldo...#comment-596604 ).

 

I'm really curious to try both of these actually, and see how they compare. 

 

But the E5 treatment (blood-plasma derived) seems like it will really be the one to try when/if it comes out in a few years (hopefully).


Edited by brian1965, 12 July 2021 - 10:33 PM.


#26 ortcloud

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Posted 13 July 2021 - 09:12 AM

I agree, it is very expensive. I'm actually looking forward to another peptide-based lotion, the "blue gel" that Harold Katcher and Akshay Sanghvi should be releasing this month for $35 for a 1 month supply

 

Blue gel is likely just GHK copper peptide, it has been around forever and you can buy it right now so you dont have to wait for Katcher.



#27 brian1965

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Posted 21 July 2021 - 12:35 AM

Blue gel is likely just GHK copper peptide, it has been around forever and you can buy it right now so you dont have to wait for Katcher.

 

Hmm, maybe. The claim is that the Blue Gel peptide is able to "reset more than 6,000 genes to a younger profile when its systemic levels are restored to those found in the young".  I haven't been able to track down a peptide that makes that claim, but apparently there is a study "conducted by the most eminent Institute in USA" that supports it.

 

https://joshmitteldo...#comment-632565

https://joshmitteldo...#comment-637330



#28 ortcloud

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Posted 21 July 2021 - 02:09 AM

 Blue Gel peptide is able to "reset more than 6,000 genes to a younger profile when its systemic levels are restored to those found in the young". 

 

I haven't been able to track down a peptide that makes that claim

 

Would you be disappointed to find out its just ghk copper peptide?

 

Since it is nothing new and it has been freely available and Katcher is making everyone wait for nothing?



#29 brian1965

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Posted 21 July 2021 - 12:01 PM

Would you be disappointed to find out its just ghk copper peptide?

 

Since it is nothing new and it has been freely available and Katcher is making everyone wait for nothing?

 

No, I'd be ok with it either way. But I'm just curious if it's something like GHK copper, or if it's something new. The anticipated $35 price does seem to suggest that it's not likely something new.



#30 ortcloud

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Posted 21 July 2021 - 04:10 PM

So you are ok with Katcher stringing everybody along this whole time making people think it is something new and unique like you are saying only to find out it was nothing unique and has been around for a long time and you could have bought it on amazon this whole time?

 

I am not ok with that.

 

I will be very disappointed to find that out.

 







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