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OS-1 and OneSkin

skin rejuvenation

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#31 ortcloud

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Posted 23 July 2021 - 06:17 PM

Hmm, maybe. The claim is that the Blue Gel peptide is able to "reset more than 6,000 genes to a younger profile when its systemic levels are restored to those found in the young".  I haven't been able to track down a peptide that makes that claim, but apparently there is a study "conducted by the most eminent Institute in USA" that supports it.

 

So were you able to find the research now?

 

Its very easy to find the study and the name of the institute once you know the the name the of the peptide.


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#32 brian1965

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Posted 23 July 2021 - 06:58 PM

Not yet, did you find one?

Edited by brian1965, 23 July 2021 - 06:59 PM.


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#33 ortcloud

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Posted 25 July 2021 - 11:36 PM

Not yet, did you find one?

 

 

what search terms are you googling?

 

it should be very easy to find once you know the answer.

 

You could google ghk reset genes and it would be the first result



#34 brian1965

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Posted 10 August 2021 - 12:02 AM

You are correct. The ringless hand is the one that got the application of OneSkin.

 

Unfortunately, I did not take a "before" picture of the treatment hand. My bad.

 

Well, I ordered some of this One Skin.  I got a discount so purchased it for about $79.  It arrived and I used it on my arms, face and neck, once a day (the directions said to use it twice a day).  Using it once a day, it was still gone within a week. It's only a 1.7 fl oz bottle.

 

I have no idea if it started rejuvenating my skin, but at that price, I think I'll pass. I'd probably need a gallon of it every couple months. lol



#35 ortcloud

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Posted 07 November 2021 - 03:34 PM

Well, I ordered some of this One Skin.  I got a discount so purchased it for about $79.  It arrived and I used it on my arms, face and neck, once a day (the directions said to use it twice a day).  Using it once a day, it was still gone within a week. It's only a 1.7 fl oz bottle.

 

I have no idea if it started rejuvenating my skin, but at that price, I think I'll pass. I'd probably need a gallon of it every couple months. lol

 

I gave up on the Oneskin after a couple of months, I saw no difference.

 

I am switching back to rapamycin cream and GHK blue gel.

 

Did you ever end up trying the GHK blue gel?

 

There are several on amazon, also you can get the concentrate and just add some to your

daily lotion at about 1% concentration.

 

The inventor Loren Pickart sells his stuff on his own site and is supposed to be the best has several concentrations.



#36 ortcloud

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Posted 20 November 2021 - 09:26 PM

Hmm, maybe. The claim is that the Blue Gel peptide is able to "reset more than 6,000 genes to a younger profile when its systemic levels are restored to those found in the young".  I haven't been able to track down a peptide that makes that claim, but apparently there is a study "conducted by the most eminent Institute in USA" that supports it.

 

Very easy to find, I just googled "reset genes" it was the first search result



#37 brian1965

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Posted 21 November 2021 - 04:13 PM

Very easy to find, I just googled "reset genes" it was the first search result

 

The first one that comes up for me is by 3 authors, including a professional hypnotherapist, and is from a private company. They all seem to have affiliation with Univ of Wash which I'm sure is a fine school, but wouldn't qualify as "the most eminent Institute in USA" imho.

 

Do you have a link to a study that:

 

1.  Is of a peptide, and 

2.  Resets more than 6,000 genes to a younger profile, when the peptide's systemic levels are restored to those found in the young, and

3.  Was conducted by the most eminent institute in USA (e.g. Harvard, Yale, etc)?

 

I'm not finding anything that matches those.  If you found one and could point me to a specific study, that would be great.  Thanks.



#38 ortcloud

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Posted 21 November 2021 - 04:46 PM

Wait, so you didnt even read it then??

 

Everything is in the article, all the answers you seek, but you actually have to read the full research article though.


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#39 brian1965

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Posted 21 November 2021 - 05:50 PM

Wait, so you didnt even read it then??

 

Everything is in the article, all the answers you seek, but you actually have to read the full research article though.

 

So this Pickart study is the only one you're aware of, that you think Akshay/Katcher was referring to?



#40 ortcloud

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Posted 21 November 2021 - 05:59 PM

So this Pickart study is the only one you're aware of, that you think Akshay/Katcher was referring to?

 

No, there are plenty of studies on ghk, but now that you have the search term you can confirm all the clues.

 

btw. Did you finally figure out the "the most eminent institution" clue ?


Edited by ortcloud, 21 November 2021 - 06:05 PM.

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#41 brian1965

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Posted 21 November 2021 - 07:05 PM

No, there are plenty of studies on ghk, but now that you have the search term you can confirm all the clues.

 

btw. Did you finally figure out the "the most eminent institution" clue ?

 

If you think you know the study that was referred to, just provide it.  Why play all these games?


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#42 ortcloud

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Posted 21 November 2021 - 10:02 PM

If you think you know the study that was referred to, just provide it.  Why play all these games?

 

I already told you the study, you didnt read it.

 

How is it going to make any difference if I give you the link to the study you already have if you wont read it?


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#43 Mind

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Posted 01 December 2021 - 08:56 PM

So were you able to find the research now?

 

Its very easy to find the study and the name of the institute once you know the the name the of the peptide.

 

Please list the research paper or link to the article.



#44 ortcloud

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Posted 01 December 2021 - 09:26 PM

Harold announced it was GHK last week as I predicted so this question of blue gel being GHK is now settled.



#45 brian1965

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Posted 01 December 2021 - 09:50 PM

Harold announced it was GHK last week as I predicted so this question of blue gel being GHK is now settled.

 

Yep, you were right.  What do you think of their argument that they've invented a unique way of delivery that improves the half-life?  I could see their future patch being an effective means of delivery, that overcomes the 30 (?) minute half-life problem.  Curious as to what they're doing differently with the NEEL gel.



#46 ortcloud

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Posted 02 December 2021 - 08:39 PM

Yep, you were right.  What do you think of their argument that they've invented a unique way of delivery that improves the half-life?  I could see their future patch being an effective means of delivery, that overcomes the 30 (?) minute half-life problem.  Curious as to what they're doing differently with the NEEL gel.

 

I dont think there is much substance to it. It seems like it is the same fake marketing hype they have been using for over a year now. They have very little credibility with the way they have handled this whole thing. There are alot of upset people out there now because of the way Akshay strung them along with all the things he was saying to promote it. I am going to keep using the blue gel that is made by the real inventor, Loren Pickart. Harold is a nice guy and a trustworthy scientist, but his partner is a business man and it shows.



#47 QuestforLife

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Posted 02 December 2021 - 09:00 PM

I dont think there is much substance to it. It seems like it is the same fake marketing hype they have been using for over a year now. They have very little credibility with the way they have handled this whole thing. There are alot of upset people out there now because of the way Akshay strung them along with all the things he was saying to promote it. I am going to keep using the blue gel that is made by the real inventor, Loren Pickart. Harold is a nice guy and a trustworthy scientist, but his partner is a business man and it shows.


It is a mystery to me how NEEL could have a patent. GHK-Cu they obviously can't patent. And transdermal patches aren't exactly new either...so it is a specific patent for GHK-Cu in a transdermal patch. Hard to believe it hasn't been done before.

#48 Daniel Cooper

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Posted 02 December 2021 - 10:51 PM

So the Blue Gel being discussed on Mittledorf's website is just Cu-GHK?

 

That's very disappointing. The discussion over there the last time I checked (which has been a little while) was that this stuff was a major breakthrough in aging. I can buy injectable Cu-GHK peptide and inject it sub-Q which I would assume is going to be superior to a transdermal gel, unless it solves some short half life issue as someone mentioned above. 

 

 


Edited by Daniel Cooper, 03 December 2021 - 04:36 AM.


#49 brian1965

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Posted 03 December 2021 - 04:01 PM

So the Blue Gel being discussed on Mittledorf's website is just Cu-GHK?
 
That's very disappointing. The discussion over there the last time I checked (which has been a little while) was that this stuff was a major breakthrough in aging. I can buy injectable Cu-GHK peptide and inject it sub-Q which I would assume is going to be superior to a transdermal gel, unless it solves some short half life issue as someone mentioned above. 

 

Here is how the differences between their NEEL gel and plain Cu-GHK were explained by Harold Katcher (from an update email from ntzplural.com, Harold's publisher):

------Start of attachment------

Since May 2020, when the pre-print on the successful E5 experiment was released, another product has become familiar to the community that follows the work of Yuvan Research. Initially known as "blue gel", it is now finally being launched on the market under the name NEEL gel. To explain the history of the product development and its features, we interviewed the company's Chief Science Officer, Dr. Harold Katcher. The product is currently available for pre-order at NEEL.bio. See the interview below.

 
Nicolas Chernavsky [NTZ]: Hi Harold. So, finally, the former "blue gel", now called NEEL gel, will be launched.

Harold Katcher: Yes. NEEL is simply the Sanskrit word for "blue".

NC: Interesting. We would like to know about the science behind the product, since there are millions of products available in the cosmetic field, and we suppose this gel isn't just another one, and you are the best person to explain about it.

HK: Its basic ingredient is GHK, which is glycyl-L-histidine-L-lysine. It's normally present in young people at about 200 nanograms per mL of blood, and in old people, it drops to less than half, about 80 nanograms. It seems to be involved in general with wound healing. It was discovered by Loren Pickart back in the sixties, and he and eventually his daughter started working on this and publishing on reputable papers with good results. In fact, this substance, GHK, is widely used, and you can buy it en masse. You can buy it on the internet in powder form. And if you really want, you can buy it in an injectable form, but there aren't that many people who were willing to do that. GHK is used in all the high-end cosmetics, in famous brands. They say it rejuvenates your skin. And oddly enough, unlike most cosmetics, which just hide blemishes or decrease pore size, or things of that nature, it actually does rejuvenate skin. It does encourage the basal cells that form your skin to start multiplying faster. It increases your collagen and your skin thickness after application. So that's great. But that's hardly what we're aiming for — because it already exists and you can buy your own GHK on the market and make your own cosmetics if you want to.

But what Pickart, and the Broad Institute of Boston, associated with Harvard and the MIT, showed? That GHK has more than a limited effect on skin cells. In fact, it seems to reset more than 4000 genes back to a youthful gene expression. It affects them by increasing or decreasing their levels by more than 50% and in some cases, many folds. And one of the things that it's been effective on, besides skin, is the intestinal lining. Also, lung fibrosis, COPD and cancer, because it seems to affect the cancer cells in at least two ways. It stops what they call the EMT, the epithelial-mesenchymal transition. That's a cause of cancer and lung fibrosis. And it seems to stop that, and it seems to cause cancer cells to commit suicide, a process known as apoptosis.

The problem, however, is that its half-life in the blood is half an hour, which means you inject it and it's gone. So, you really can't hold hope to achieve something like youthful levels, unless you're injecting yourself ten times a day, and most people object to that.

The big problem in terms of commercialization is that it's an available product — you can't patent it. It's a natural tripeptide that's naturally present in the body. Therefore, it's generally regarded as safe because it's always there. I mean, if it can't be patented, no drug company wants to invest money in a drug that can't be patented, except perhaps for us, because we're interested in people, and if something has a potential to help people, then let us be the vanguard and let the drug companies follow us. We actually went a little bit further thanks to Akshay, Kavita and Agnivesh, her husband. We have a patent, and the patent is for our formula which improves permeation to all the dermal layers and transdermal delivery. This solves the problem of the short half-life, and our upcoming product NEEL patch will be able to maintain optimum levels of GHK in us 24/7 to get the maximum benefit.

We've proven this in vitro, with artificial skin, and then seeing how far it penetrates. But more than that, I tried it for almost a year. And the first effect that really impressed me is that I had actinic purpura on my arm. So, I applied it to my arms, and the standard recipe is twice a day for two weeks. And sure enough, my actinic purpura disappeared. And they didn't come back again. Every once in a while, I'd have one little spot somewhere else on my arm, but tiny and insignificant.

But more than that, I felt better, I felt energy. What before had been a slog, where every step was like pushing myself further, became a walk, and sometimes even pleasant. And finally, when I came home, being in Utah, rather than Mumbai — I have a sort of home there too, and good friends — the walk from my carport to the back of my house, through my yard, which had previously been like a trudge, became a walk, just a stroll, just nothing of any significance. And you guys don't know because you're not old. When you see those old people walking one slow step at a time, it's because it's very painful for them.

Nina Torres Zanvettor: Harold, regarding this peptide, there is GHK, and GHK complexed with copper...

HK: Ours is complexed with cupric ion.

NTZ: OK, so in your product, copper is also present.

HK: The name NEEL gel means "blue gel" in Sanskrit, and it's not blue because it's colored blue. It's blue because it contains cupric ions, the same thing that makes copper sulfate blue.

NC: Was it tested on humans? Besides you, of course.

HK: Yes, we are all set to test it in an IRB human clinical trial with 25 volunteers. The IRB committee has already granted full approval and it should start by December or January. In fact, it's Akshay's baby, but we both agreed on this three years ago. We sat in a hotel on the waterfront, on the beach, the Juhu beach in Mumbai, and we discussed what products we thought were worth developing. And I was, and Akshay agreed, a great advocate of GHK. And GHK has already given me blessed relief, quite honestly. And I'm just hoping to give it to other people. It's not really expensive. So to be able to walk like a human being instead of like a reanimated zombie, it's a big thing.

NTZ: You said you made in vitro tests with artificial skin. Was it in those tests that you evaluated that using this excipient the GHK went through all the layers of the skin?

HK: Yes, but let me add a little bit to that. After a while, I stopped applying the GHK to my skin. And instead, I put a little bit on my fingertip, about two drops worth, and I put it on my soft palate — that's the space just behind a bony ridge on the top of your mouth. And the soft palate directly leads to the pituitary gland and the hypothalamus above it. And I thought: perhaps if I brought this to my hypothalamus... And it worked, and for almost an entire year that I used this gel, I applied it twice a week to the roof of my mouth. And the fact that it prevented the actinic purpura, and still gave me all the energy, meant that it was working systemically.

NTZ: While you were using the gel every day, did you do any blood tests to see if the blood level of GHK increased?

HK: We tried to do it. We just didn't have the technical facility. Theoretically, we could find the increase of the copper level in the blood because it's a copper-carrying peptide, but that wouldn't necessarily prove the increase in the amount of the peptide itself in the blood.

NC: You said that the product can't be patented, but that the product is used by the cosmetic industry in the products...

HK: GHK can't be patented, but its method of application can be patented, and the excipients used to speed its entrance into the body can and were patented. The patent we have filed is for transdermal delivery, as that would solve the short half-life problem and create sustained levels of GHK-Cu in us.

NC: If GHK is so good in all aspects as you described, the reason the industry — the pharmaceutical industry, the cosmetic industry — didn't develop a way to deliver it through the skin seems to be that they didn't invest enough.

HK: The cosmetic industry had no reason to do it. The fact of the matter is you can show that GHK will penetrate through the stratum corneum, the thick layer of the skin that prevents things from entering in, but slowly. It's good enough for skin, however, because you only have to go through a fraction of a millimeter to get to the base layer of the skin cells at the bottom of the epidermis.

NC: So the beneficial effects of the NEEL gel are not just for the skin...

HK: Right!

NC: ...because if it were just for this skin...

HK: There are one million products out there for that.

NC: Yes, exactly. This is important.

NTZ: So it's like a systemic action, but that you apply it through the skin to get this systemic effect.

HK: The skin or, as I mentioned, I applied it to the roof of my mouth. And you can apply it to any mucous membrane, to uptake it into the systemic circulation. And this is generally regarded as safe. It's already a constituent of humans, and there's never been shown to be any harmful level of it.

NTZ: You said the half-life in the blood is like half an hour. Do you think this happens because there is some kind of homeostasis to keep the concentration at a specific level?

HK: Sure.

NTZ: OK, so probably there is a system that the body has to maintain a certain concentration of GHK.

HK: Yeah, I'm sure. And I'm sure it's age-dependent.

NC: So the aim of NEEL gel is not only the skin but a systemic effect to reverse a bit a set of health problems?

HK: We don't know how much effect it has and we're looking for volunteers now. We're going anywhere from cancer to COPD, which is otherwise untreatable, to intestinal irritable bowel syndrome too, because it helps regenerate intestinal lining, to various problems dealing with bone, to incurable diseases like idiopathic fibrosis of the lung, or kidney, for that matter, because it seems to prevent fibrosis. So honestly, we're talking about what the ancients called a panacea, which seems crazy. But it seems to have that effect, at least to a limited degree, but it's a known limit so that you really feel the effect. And you feel the lack of it as well.

NTZ: The peptide GHK, as you said, is generally regarded as safe, but the excipients that you created, did you also test to confirm their safety?

HK: Yes, they are safe too, of course.

NC: Harold, there is a thing that worries me a bit, because you are working with E5 as well. E5 is a product that can potentially reverse aging in humans, in a way that would be a great revolution. And I fear that if Yuvan launches a product that, let's say...

HK: A product that makes money and we will forget about E5? No. E5 is our goal. NEEL gel is a boon to the elderly, but it won't reverse their age. It may make them healthier. It may make them more fit. It may make them more capable, but it won't make them young again. It may reduce their wrinkles, yes, and increase their endurance, etc. But they won't be young men again or young women again.

NC: OK, because I fear that if people see that Yuvan launched a product that is, let's say, similar to many other products in the market...

HK: If it were similar, we wouldn't have marketed it. The fact that we have, so that it enters your body and does deep healing, not just the superficial healing, that you don't have to inject it, which nobody wants to do, makes it a product that goes from a bizarre case of self-hacking to a legitimate product that will help people.

NC: Will there be further testing in humans during the same time that the product is on the market?

HK: Of course!

NC: Will it be continuously trialed?

HK: It will be continuously trialed until we see just how much it can do. And we are thinking about developing specific applications and specific methods of application as well.

NTZ: Do you know if it's a gel for the whole body, or just the hands or the face?

HK: It's a gel that can be used anywhere on the body.

NTZ: Nowadays, the scientific community doesn't know exactly the mode of action of this peptide, right? They know that it's good, that has a lot of beneficial effects, but exactly what it does is not clear.

HK: We know it changes gene transcription profiles. I mean, that much we know. Exactly how it does that, we don't know.

NC: When you say that GHK influences so many genes and brings so many benefits, I was wondering if people will think it has something to do with E5, you know?

HK: No, I want to make it very clear that it has nothing whatsoever to do with E5. I mean, as far as I know, E5 may cause its increased production, that's certainly a possibility, but E5 permanently changes the age phenotype and the epigenotype of cells. This, I don't know if it does. Actually, this is an interesting question I'd like to answer myself with Steve Horvath's help. But having used it for a year, I found it very beneficial, but I still don't look like I'm 21.

NTZ: Can you tell us a bit about how the research with this peptide started? Were you in India working with E5 already, or had you started working with this before? How did this happen? Whose idea was it?

HK: Akshay Sanghavi has been looking for quite a long time — actually, since his mother's death — for the causes of diabetes, aging and the diseases of aging. And he read my papers. And he thought I had something. He wasn't a trained scientist, but it's his passion, and he's very knowledgeable, and he was right. So, Akshay looked through all the possible chemicals that might have an effect on aging. And we went through the list and we decided which ones were the most likely candidates. And we picked the NEEL gel as one of those, we picked something else which probably would have worked too, but it's a long story.

NTZ: So you started working on this before E5 then.

HK: No. It was intermittently, while we were working on E5. Originally we didn't start to work on E5, we started with what I called Heterochronic Plasma Exchange. It is what I published in 2013. It's the exchange of plasma from young animals to old animals, from young humans to old humans, etc. I have a more than reasonable expectation that it would work at least somewhat. E5 is in fact a much better solution, or potentially a much better solution. I'd like to see it tried, actually. But once we realized that the rats would not take this plasma exchange, then I had to come up with something else. So in the meantime, we were working on a lot of different things. We were working on an Ayurvedic plant-based mixture, which did seem to have good effects. Not quite as dramatic, and it took a very long time and huge amounts, but it did seem to show the reversal of aging. And then E5 came, which to me was a total surprise. It was based on guesses, assumption upon assumption upon assumption, and apparently they all proved to be correct. So lucky!

NTZ: Regarding the gel, there is copper in the composition, and I know this is a common thing that people might be worried about, like “there are metals...”

HK: There's not enough copper to be harmful. We checked it out. You would have to have tons of the stuff to get enough copper to be harmful.

NC: So I think that's it, right? Thank you very much, Harold.

HK: Thank you.

------
 
The skin and inflammaging

In recent years, the idea that the skin can play an important role in "inflammaging" has been gaining strength in the rejuvenation field. For example, a human clinical trial conducted by UCSF wherein the volunteers applied an over-the-counter skin cream all over their body had very exciting findings. According to UCSF's March 2019 press release on the topic, “Thirty-three older adults between the ages of 58 and 95 applied the cream all over their bodies twice a day for 30 days. After a month, the researchers measured blood levels of three cytokines—interleukin-1 beta, interleukin-6, and tumor necrosis factor (TNF) alpha—that have all been implicated in age-related inflammatory diseases.”

The results of the study were impressive, and the UCSF article goes on: “Using the cream reduced the amount of all three cytokines compared to both the participants’ levels before using the cream and the levels of similarly aged adults who did not use the cream. In fact, using the cream lowered participants’ cytokine levels to be nearly equivalent with people in their 30s, suggesting that rejuvenating the skin can reverse ‘inflamm-aging.’ The cream also improved skin hydration, lowered pH, and repaired the permeability barrier."

According to Akshay Sanghavi, co-developer of NEEL gel at Yuvan Research, “if a regular skin cream can give such systemic benefits, NEEL gel should surely give the same if not much more. So, after conducting your own research and consulting your doctor, you have the option of trying to follow the regimen used in the 2019 trial [described above] with NEEL gel.” Regarding the results, Sanghavi gives another suggestion to the future users: “if you wish to quantify your benefits, take a blood test of IL-6 and TNF-alpha cytokines before you start applying and after having applied twice a day all over the body after 30 or 60 days, and please send your results to customerservice@neel.bio, with photos, if possible.”

----- End of attachment -----
 



#50 QuestforLife

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Posted 03 December 2021 - 04:16 PM

I can buy injectable Cu-GHK peptide and inject it sub-Q which I would assume is going to be superior to a transdermal gel, unless it solves some short half life issue as someone mentioned above. 

 

I would be interested in seeing any references supplied on the half life of GHK in the blood stream.

 

I assume GHK is similar to various short chain collagen peptides; being a product of damaged extra cellular matrix they then trigger the body to turnover the ECM more than it otherwise would do.

 

Because GHK bonds strongly to copper, which it can take from albumin present in the blood, it has further benefits in terms of localised antioxidant effect and the aforementioned gene resetting, whose mechanism is unknown (,but might be downstream antioxidant effects or of ECM turnover or be completely unrelated). 

 

But my point is that if GHK in the blood is a trigger for ECM repair, would we necessarily want it to be constant, i.e. maintained over a long time by a patch or slow-release gel? It might be better to inject GHK-Cu once per day and get a short lived spike of repair than try and up-regulate repair permanently, with unknown consequences. We just don't know, but I'd advice against assuming slow release would automatically be better. 



#51 RWhigham

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Posted 03 December 2021 - 10:57 PM

Yuvan has a new trademark "Oh, Really" possibly a new name for their blue gel. Referencing earlier comments in this thread about One-Skin, I used up my first and only order on the back of one hand and could not see any difference between my hands--so I gave up on One-Skin. I now have pre-ordered two blue gels.


Edited by RWhigham, 03 December 2021 - 11:03 PM.


#52 Paravani

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Posted 30 December 2021 - 10:50 PM

If someone can find the other thread about OneSkin (not the interview), let me know, perhaps we can merge them.

I used OneSkin for about a month and a half, one one hand but not the other.

Look at the picture and tell me if you notice a difference. Does one hand look "younger" or "better" (better color or less wrinkles)

I tried to take the picture in good light and balanced between the hands.

Looking at the picture. I think I can do better. Need a higher-res picture. Coming soon.



Funny, I ran a similar experiment with a product I bought off Amazon that didn't purport to be anything but a moisturizer. My results were similar to yours as well, with significantly fewer wrinkles on my treated right hand and significantly plumper skin.

After a month without treatment, there is still some difference, but the skin is drier and has more wrinkles than it did last month.

I think I'll start treating both hands and my face with this stuff. It's only $15 per jar. It's called Hada Labo Skin Plumping Gel Cream.





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