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They say real aging begins at 30 years old or so

aging

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#1 Qowpel

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Posted 28 September 2021 - 05:56 PM


This is something I have seen parroted many a time on this and other age-centric forums.

I am 29 years old at the moment. In two months I will be 30. I generally fast, supplement metformin, restrict methionine, and exercise to keep my NAD levels up and inhibit mTOR.

However, I have read many times that the other stuff such as Fisetin, broccoli sprouts for sulforephane, etc, should only be started when you hit 30 since your body willingly activates pro aging genes at that time....

Is thia true?

Like, my biological age as of a few months ago was 26.5 (according to the average of different tests), I tend to be told I look younger as well, but Don't know if that's a reliable metric, and I also athletically still perform as well as I did 5 years ago...

I guess my question is, dis anyone else who started anti aging strategies in their 20s, notice that at 30 and beyond that they seemed to age more rapidly than before (even with things like fasting, metformin, other anti aging substances, etc)?
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#2 QuestforLife

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Posted 29 September 2021 - 08:56 AM

I can only speak personally, but I began seriously trying to hold back (and reverse) my biological age from my late thirties, although I was doing much reading on the subject earlier. It is my observation that the younger you are, the harder it is to notice any benefit from anti-aging strategies. I, like most people, began to take more action as I noticed the effects of aging and this is in partial agreement with your statement that aging begins at 30. I didn't really notice aging until 35-40.

 

Tony Wyss-Coray believes aging occurs in 'waves' that can be seen in changes in proteins found in the blood, with the first 'wave' occurring in the 4th decade of life. This might be the origin of your quote.

 

If we accept this hypothesis, then keeping our biological age below, or if not stopping it from rising past the first wave, should be an effective strategy and alter our aging trajectory. I am consistently getting biological age scores in the mid-thirties whist I advance in my forties. If I can keep it there (or even better get it under 30), then I will feel my interventions are effective. For older folks, they could likewise try and stay below the later aging waves (according to Wyss-Coray, in the 7th and 8th decades of life). For yourself, I would not expect to see huge ‘improvements’, but if you can keep your biological age below 30, then as far as I am concerned you are winning.
How we measure this biological age is another story.

 

 

Aging is the predominant risk factor for numerous chronic diseases that limit healthspan. Mechanisms of aging are thus increasingly recognized as therapeutic targets. Blood from young mice reverses aspects of aging and disease across multiple tissues, pointing to the intriguing possibility that age-related molecular changes in blood can provide novel insight into disease biology. We measured 2,925 plasma proteins from 4,331 young adults to nonagenarians and developed a novel bioinformatics approach which uncovered profound non-linear alterations in the human plasma proteome with age. Waves of changes in the proteome in the fourth, seventh, and eighth decades of life reflected distinct biological pathways, and revealed differential associations with the genome and proteome of age-related diseases and phenotypic traits. This new approach to the study of aging led to the identification of unexpected signatures and pathways of aging and disease and offers potential pathways for aging interventions. Source: https://www.biorxiv....0.1101/751115v1

Edited by QuestforLife, 29 September 2021 - 08:57 AM.


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#3 experimenting

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Posted 02 October 2021 - 03:20 PM

So what did you do, and did it work?


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#4 orion22

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Posted 03 October 2021 - 05:08 PM

that means in 3 months you will need a cane you will be so old that you will feel the need  to yell at little kids and teenager 


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#5 floret

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Posted 06 October 2021 - 12:55 PM

No, I don't believe this is true. Sure, aging may start to become more apparent or certain aging traits may appear for the first time in the 30s, but the process was already under way long before that. Do people in general look as young and healthy at 30 as they did at 20? It's long been known that athletic ability starts to decline in the early 20s. Fertility is already declining by age 30.  And I saw subtle signs of aging in myself starting shortly before age 20 (a couple small wrinkles in the face, if I looked closely enough). By my mid 20s I was already aware that my near vision was beginning to go.  I noticed these things because I pick up on them easily but I don't look unusually old for my age or anything and doctors never said there was anything wrong.



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#6 QuestforLife

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Posted 07 October 2021 - 06:48 AM

No, I don't believe this is true. Sure, aging may start to become more apparent or certain aging traits may appear for the first time in the 30s, but the process was already under way long before that. Do people in general look as young and healthy at 30 as they did at 20? It's long been known that athletic ability starts to decline in the early 20s. Fertility is already declining by age 30.  And I saw subtle signs of aging in myself starting shortly before age 20 (a couple small wrinkles in the face, if I looked closely enough). By my mid 20s I was already aware that my near vision was beginning to go.  I noticed these things because I pick up on them easily but I don't look unusually old for my age or anything and doctors never said there was anything wrong.

 

Of course not everything that happens with time is aging. For example skin aging can just be sun damage. And arthritis can be just be collagen deficiency. Even though both are also made worse by aging. But until we properly reverse whatever aging is, we won't know what remains to be fixed. But it is naive to believe that nothing problematic will remain. Most likely within a short space of time agelessness will be taken for granted and most people will realise they weren't actually that beautiful or athletic or smart even when they were young, and these will be the next items on the list to be 'fixed'. 


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