• Log in with Facebook Log in with Twitter Log In with Google      Sign In    
  • Create Account
  LongeCity
              Advocacy & Research for Unlimited Lifespans

Photo
- - - - -

Doctor's Best resveratrol


  • Please log in to reply
100 replies to this topic

#91 drmz

  • Guest
  • 574 posts
  • 10
  • Location:netherlands

Posted 14 November 2007 - 04:20 PM

Here's Biotivia's 15 minutes of fame (they've passed the CL test, haven't they):

http://www.emediawir...1/emw569133.htm

Today Biotivia announced that it had succeeded in greatly improving absorption and utilization of resveratrol taken orally through application of a combination of proprietary techniques.

(PRWEB) November 13, 2007 -- In virtually all studies since 1994 on orally administered resveratrol the issue of bio availability of the compound has been highlighted as a major drawback to its effectiveness. The half life of standard resveratrol is less than 20 minutes in a person's blood stream.. Some additional benefit from resveratrol comes from the recirculation of its metabolites by the liver, unless they are blocked by Quercitin which some suppliers include in their products thinking that this ingredient will actually increase bio availability.

This problem has led many scientists to question the efficacy of most of the resveratrol supplements currently on the market. Most of the important studies have pointed out that the effects of resveratrol are highly dose dependent. The human equivalent dose for a 160-pound adult would be about 1575 milligrams of standard resveratrol to produce the health benefits noted in the Harvard mouse study. The study published in the journal Nature late last year used a dose of 364mg when adjusted for human body factors. Poor utilization of resveratrol represents a huge challenge for supplement suppliers, and more importantly, their customers seeking to replicate the dose used in the recent scientific studies on small mammals. Increasing the molecule's bio availability therefore has a huge impact on the efficacy of resveratrol when taken as a supplement.

Biotivia began investigating technologies to improve bio availability of the critical trans-resveratrol isomer one year ago in conjunction with a major university pharmacy school and a large pharmaceutical manufacturer. The breakthrough came about in September of this year.

Today the company announced that it had succeeded in greatly improving absorption and utilization of resveratrol taken orally through application of a combination of proprietary techniques. Although the exact processes are trade secrets it is known that they involve altering the physical characteristics of the raw material prior to processing, use of advanced processing and purification technologies, and the complexing of the finished product with of a small amount of a natural organic adjutant which improves the bio availability of their Bioforte and Transmax products.

Biotivia's chief research scientist, Saurabh Shah and the company founder, James Betz, have compiled a 167 page paper on current research on resveratrol's effects. The paper is available to qualified physicians and researchers upon request.

Biotivia resveratrol products, Transmax and Bioforte, are available to researchers and the public at their website, biotivia.com.

(care to second guess anyone? micronization, bioperine, grapefruit extract?)



hmmzz interesting.Too bad they don't put the evidence on the table and show what they have done, they could patent the stuff i guess before doing this (?)
I spent alot of time reading about resveratrol and i wish i did not ordered it for the price i did (including tax and shipping cost). The bioavailability seems to be near 0 anyways and maybe a bit higher using different techniques to take the resveratrol. Seems like a big hype to me although i'll keep reading the posts here and read new studies. And ofcourse i will eat the pills i already have...i paid more then zero after all.

#92 Anthony_Loera

  • Life Member
  • 3,130 posts
  • 714
  • Location:Miami Florida

Posted 14 November 2007 - 04:32 PM

Hi Anthony, I assume you're referring to biotivia - isn't consumer labs independent?  Thanks.



Yes they are, but they only test product from a single batch.

On a month to month basis, a company can receive batches of resveratrol from a supplier. Biotivia has stated that they do not independently test each batch, in fact they do not do independent testing.

Consumer Labs is a paid marketing lab, which publishes findings from folks paying for results. We didn't want to "pay-to-play" at this time and were not included in the study. We prefer to use AACL labs for our independent testing of our Trans-Resveratrol product.

So the questions are:
Is the consumer labs test a one shot (independent lab test) for Biotivia? Probably
Is Biotivia going to do independent testing from now on? I don't think so, they have internal testing done abroad.
Does the US consumer want products coming from other countries tested for safety and quality in the US? Yes


Regarding the Bioavailability marketing literature... it is marketing for a formulation. Look at the label and read what has been added, if anything. I believe the marketing is very ambiguous about this point. If you read the website, it seems like the change from 50% resveratrol to 98% trans-resveratrol is what they are hyping as an increase in Bioavailability. If this is so, they are behind the curve, not ahead of it.

A

Click HERE to rent this advertising spot to support LongeCity (this will replace the google ad above).

#93 tintinet

  • Location:ME

Posted 14 November 2007 - 04:54 PM

While I'm pleased Biotiva's product passed the CL.com test, I continue to order from RevGenetics, for the reasons Anthony has listed above.

#94 browser

  • Validating
  • 319 posts
  • 1
  • Location:Austin, TX

Posted 14 November 2007 - 06:40 PM

hmmzz interesting.Too bad they don't put the evidence on the table and show what they have done, they could patent the stuff i guess before doing this (?)
I spent alot of time reading about resveratrol and i wish i did not ordered it for the price i did (including tax and shipping cost). The bioavailability seems to be near 0 anyways and maybe a bit higher using different techniques to take the resveratrol. Seems like a big hype to me although i'll keep reading the posts here and read new studies. And ofcourse i will eat the pills i already have...i paid more then zero after all.


I was just offered some of the resveratrol powder purchased from the Legend in His Own Mind in Canada. I turned it down. I was very excited about resveratrol then I read the vendor websites and the struggling here on ImmInst. I am tired of being an early adapter. I'm going to wait for the market and knowhow to settle out in whether to take this stuff and the ability to take it at a reasonable price (since right now, no one is quite sure what dosages work [no need to recount the research, I've read it and it points in all directions]).

#95 shanegfasho

  • Guest
  • 4 posts
  • 0

Posted 14 November 2007 - 11:38 PM

browser, this was the COMPLETE label. I am not sure what you are asking but the milligram totals are accurate. Please let me know what you meant, exactly. Thanks!

#96 browser

  • Validating
  • 319 posts
  • 1
  • Location:Austin, TX

Posted 14 November 2007 - 11:52 PM

browser, this was the COMPLETE label.  I am not sure what you are asking but the milligram totals are accurate.  Please let me know what you meant, exactly.  Thanks!

Would you mind telling me which post of mine you're responding to? I remember doing research on various resveratrol offerings last year. Longivenex said on their website that their product contained X mg. (was it 50 mg that got doubled to 100 mg?) but said they did not want to put that on the label, instead saying something vague like "wine extracts" to prevent the stuff, IIRC, from being considered a drug by the FDA.

#97 niner

  • Guest
  • 16,276 posts
  • 2,000
  • Location:Philadelphia

Posted 15 November 2007 - 02:56 AM

(PRWEB) November 13, 2007 -- In virtually all studies since 1994 on orally administered resveratrol the issue of bio availability of the compound has been highlighted as a major drawback to its effectiveness. The half life of standard resveratrol is less than 20 minutes in a person's blood stream.. Some additional benefit from resveratrol comes from the recirculation of its metabolites by the liver, unless they are blocked by Quercitin which some suppliers include in their products thinking that this ingredient will actually increase bio availability.

This is the kind of stuff that bugs me about Biotivia. They are either getting the science wrong or lying, and while I can't say which it is, neither makes me feel good about them. The "recirculation of its metabolites by the liver" they speak of must be entero-hepatic recirculation, where resveratrol conjugates are excreted in the bile, and hours later the conjugating groups are cleaved by bacteria in the gut. The free resveratrol is then reabsorbed, leading to a broad but low second peak in the concentration vs. time curve. The problem here is that the second peak isn't going to be high enough to activate SIRT1, so it's essentially useless. They spell "quercetin" wrong, and suggest that it will not increase bioavailability, and further that competitors who include quercetin in a resveratrol formulation are deluded. The theory behind quercetin use as a sulfation inhibitor is sound, and the claimed effect it has on entero-hepatic recirculation is IMHO irrelevant. If they offered some evidence that quercetin was not useful as a sulfation inhibitor, that would be a genuine contribution.

...Although the exact processes are trade secrets it is known that they involve altering the physical characteristics of the raw material prior to processing, use of advanced processing and purification technologies, and the complexing of the finished product with of a small amount of a natural organic adjutant which improves the bio availability of their Bioforte and Transmax products.


An "adjutant". Hmm. Better look that one up.

adjutant
n 1: an officer who acts as military assistant to a more senior
officer [syn: aide, aide-de-camp]
2: large Indian stork with a military gait [syn: adjutant bird,
adjutant stork, Leptoptilus dubius]

So they're adding a large Indian stork to their formulation. Better patent that quickly.

Or perhaps they meant "adjuvant"? I'm such a stickler for spelling. I just can't seem to shake the notion that people who can't get it together enough to spell things correctly and use the right terms in a freaking Press Release maybe are blowing it on a lot of other details.

Probably they have micronized it and compounded it with something Tweenish or lecithin-like. If so, I like the concept, but I'd like to see some data and a bit of clarity. I don't feel like taking their word for it.

#98 maxwatt

  • Guest, Moderator LeadNavigator
  • 4,938 posts
  • 1,612
  • Location:New York

Posted 15 November 2007 - 04:03 AM

[quote]QUOTE
(PRWEB) November 13, 2007 -- In virtually all studies since 1994 on orally administered resveratrol the issue of bio availability of the compound has been highlighted as a major drawback to its effectiveness. The half life of standard resveratrol is less than 20 minutes in a person's blood stream.. Some additional benefit from resveratrol comes from the recirculation of its metabolites by the liver, unless they are blocked by Quercitin which some suppliers include in their products thinking that this ingredient will actually increase bio availability.

This is the kind of stuff that bugs me about Biotivia. They are either getting the science wrong or lying, and while I can't say which it is, neither makes me feel good about them. The "recirculation of its metabolites by the liver" they speak of must be entero-hepatic recirculation, where resveratrol conjugates are excreted in the bile, and hours later the conjugating groups are cleaved by bacteria in the gut. The free resveratrol is then reabsorbed, leading to a broad but low second peak in the concentration vs. time curve. The problem here is that the second peak isn't going to be high enough to activate SIRT1, so it's essentially useless. They spell "quercetin" wrong, and suggest that it will not increase bioavailability, and further that competitors who include quercetin in a resveratrol formulation are deluded. The theory behind quercetin use as a sulfation inhibitor is sound, and the claimed effect it has on entero-hepatic recirculation is IMHO irrelevant. If they offered some evidence that quercetin was not useful as a sulfation inhibitor, that would be a genuine contribution.[/quote]
IF "they" refers not to "quercetin", but to "additional benefits", they are correct in what they say, though they say it badly. We know quercetin metabolites block the activation of SirT1. The issue is to what degree. What bothers me about Biotivia is that they have a good product, and probably good science, but their publicists manage to offend the educated consumer.

[quote]

#99 niner

  • Guest
  • 16,276 posts
  • 2,000
  • Location:Philadelphia

Posted 15 November 2007 - 04:56 AM

IF "they" refers not to "quercetin", but to "additional benefits", they are correct in what they say, though they say it badly. We know quercetin metabolites block the activation of SirT1. The issue is to what degree. What bothers me about Biotivia is that they have a good product, and probably good science, but their publicists manage to offend the educated consumer.


I'll say they say it badly, if that's what they really meant. The problem I have with them is their public communications, either through press release, website, or postings here, frequently appear as though they are not written or read by someone with the level of expertise that I'd like to see from a supplier of a drug that I'm going to put in my body. These kinds of companies are small enough that they don't generally have publicists working outside of the supervision of someone in the know. It makes me worry that they don't have anyone in the know.

#100 shanegfasho

  • Guest
  • 4 posts
  • 0

Posted 17 November 2007 - 09:44 PM

browser, i was speaking of the NOW label that you critiqued. Here it is again. I will also post their other resveratrol product label below. The first product below is their brand new resveratrol product. The second is their other resveratrol. The third is an interesting pomegranate/resveratrol combo.

Serving Size 1 Vcaps®

Amount Per Serving % Daily Value
Polygonum cuspidatum Extract (Root) 400 mg*
(50% Natural Trans-Resveratrol - 200 mg)
Red Wine Extract (Alcohol-Free) 10 mg*
(vitis vinifera) (min. 30% Polyphenols


Serving Size 2 Vcaps®
Servings Per Container 30

Amount Per Serving
% Daily Value

Red Wine Extract
200 mg*
(Vitis vinifera) (min. 30% Polyphenols)
Natural Trans-Resveratrol
100 mg*
(from Polygonum cuspidatum Extract) (Root)
Green Tea Extract
200 mg*
(Camellia sinensis) (Leaf) (min. 98% Total Polyphenols,
70% Total Catechins and 45% EGCg) (Contains 8 mg of Caffeine)
Grape Seed Extract
100 mg*
(Vitis vinifera) (min. 95% Polyphenols)

also, they have a product called pomeratrol:

Serving Size: 1 Vcap®
Servings Per Container: 60

Amount Per Serving % Daily Value
Pomegranate (Punica granatum (Fruit) Standardized Extract 200 mg *
Ellagic Acid (from Pomegranate Extract) 80 mg *
Proprietary Blend of Japanese Knotweed (Root) Extract (Polygonum
cuspidatum) & Grape (Skin) Extract (Vitis vinifera) 130 mg *
Trans-Resveratrol (from Japanese Knotweed (root) Extract & Grape
(Skin) Extract) 20 mg *

Click HERE to rent this advertising spot to support LongeCity (this will replace the google ad above).

#101 tintinet

  • Location:ME

Posted 17 November 2007 - 10:23 PM

Dunno. IME, NOW seems to be one of the most respected, quality conscious and responsive supplement suppliers.




0 user(s) are reading this topic

0 members, 0 guests, 0 anonymous users