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How far would you go to improve your look


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97 replies to this topic

Poll: Would you get cosmetic surgery? (167 member(s) have cast votes)

Would you get cosmetic surgery?

  1. Already done (18 votes [10.91%])

    Percentage of vote: 10.91%

  2. Yes (86 votes [52.12%])

    Percentage of vote: 52.12%

  3. No (38 votes [23.03%])

    Percentage of vote: 23.03%

  4. No but would get botox (6 votes [3.64%])

    Percentage of vote: 3.64%

  5. Other (17 votes [10.30%])

    Percentage of vote: 10.30%

Vote Guests cannot vote

#61 spacetime

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Posted 25 June 2008 - 03:58 AM

Beauty is in the eye of the beholder. So while we can't all agree on whether someone is beautiful we should be more apt to agree upon whether the person looks younger than their true age.

Edited by emitecaps, 25 June 2008 - 04:34 AM.


#62 Ghostrider

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Posted 25 June 2008 - 06:30 AM

[/quote]

no offense but she doesn't look pretty at all.
[/quote]

In regards to the top photo, certainly not. I do like the bottom one though, but that's mostly due to the makeup.

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#63 sentinel

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Posted 25 June 2008 - 08:06 AM

There has been a spate of "Yummy Mummies" having boob jobs round where I live, it's like a saline domino effect. They are all women who have had kids and would like to get their figures back (or back in proportion), like shakti.

I feel very lucky not to have to go through the physical trauma of pregnancy, having seen my wife through it 3 times and can completely understand women wanting to balance out their physiques again afterwards. Getting a set of double Gs put in is another matter!

sentinel

#64 cyborgdreamer

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Posted 10 July 2008 - 06:29 AM

Perhaps Kurzweil started to late. I had a clean diet and been training since I was 18 years old. I have been taking supplements since the mid nighties when I was a member at LEF.

This photo was taken about 8 months ago when i was 35 years.

Posted Image

Most have been guessing me 25-26 since then. Haven't changed much apart from a few grey hairs which I color :)


Lol, zoolander you totally look like your namesake.

Edited by cyborgdreamer, 10 July 2008 - 06:29 AM.


#65 jenq

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Posted 16 July 2008 - 07:25 AM

Currently:

- monthly lactic acid peels

- yearly IPL (intense pulsed light)

- hylauronic acid for filling lines and lips

- occasional microdermabrasion

Previously:

- sclerotherapy for spider veins

- glycolic acid peels

#66 Ben

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Posted 16 July 2008 - 09:27 AM

I would be very interested in the effect the IPL and the microdermabrasion have on you.


Currently:

- yearly IPL (intense pulsed light)

- occasional microdermabrasion



#67 jenq

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Posted 18 July 2008 - 09:23 AM

Great results with IPL over the past 4 years. Sun spots are gone and any skin discolouration on face, neck and decolletage has cleared. Pain factor is high for me, but oh so worth it.

The clinic I attend also offers microdermabrasion immediately prior to the IPL. Coincidentally, I had that today with my once a year IPL maintenance regime.

Microdermabrasion coupled with a glycolic acid peel is also an option. The result is good, however the week-long facial grazing is aesthetically too severe in my case.

Personally, I prefer monthly peels to microdermabrasion.

#68 .fonclea.

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Posted 04 October 2008 - 04:32 PM

No i'd like to be a pretty old lady naturaly. :) I think my father with his wrinkles is handsome. :)
For the same result i avoid sun, don't smoke, eat fruits and hydrate my skin, smile and laught and try not to be too involved emotionaly to things.

I should also lived in the contry to avoid stress but it is not possible for the moment...

#69 VictorBjoerk

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Posted 04 October 2008 - 05:38 PM

No i'd like to be a pretty old lady naturaly. :) I think my father with his wrinkles is handsome. :)
For the same result i avoid sun, don't smoke, eat fruits and hydrate my skin, smile and laught and try not to be too involved emotionaly to things.

I should also lived in the contry to avoid stress but it is not possible for the moment...


Like this 91-year old lady?


http://flickr.com/ph...to15/503961377/

#70 .fonclea.

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Posted 04 October 2008 - 06:13 PM

No i'd like to be a pretty old lady naturaly. :) I think my father with his wrinkles is handsome. :)
For the same result i avoid sun, don't smoke, eat fruits and hydrate my skin, smile and laught and try not to be too involved emotionaly to things.

I should also lived in the contry to avoid stress but it is not possible for the moment...


Like this 91-year old lady?


http://flickr.com/ph...to15/503961377/


Yep

Your parents are hugly ? Your grandparents are too ? I don't see what's hugly in this pics.

Eternal youth no thanks, i still consider each period in life has an interest.
I want to age in good physical condition for long but estetically i have limits. We all have our preferences....
I see through wrinkles experiences and bieauty.

And i hate all the rihanna and plastic dools on TV.

#71 Dmitri

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Posted 06 October 2008 - 11:43 PM

I've younger looking 56 year-olds than sting. He, even looking healthy, still looks like someone around the 50s - maybe because of the spots of white hair. Anyways, he certainly looks healthier and younger than 58 year old, 250 pills-a-day taker young forever-wannabe Ray Kurzweil.



Posted Image


I think Sting looks about the same age as Paul (Author of “The CR Way“), yet you said he looked so young in another thread. Are you biased when it comes to people on CR?



#72 Dmitri

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Posted 06 October 2008 - 11:52 PM

I wouldn't try any of the current procedures, I hope by the time I reach 40 they’ve figured out how to use stem cells or cloned tissue and organs to rejuvenate our whole bodies more naturally not just externally which is what current cosmetic surgery is able to do. Besides, those procedures look good on women not so much in men from what I have seen.

#73 forever freedom

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Posted 07 October 2008 - 12:39 AM

I've younger looking 56 year-olds than sting. He, even looking healthy, still looks like someone around the 50s - maybe because of the spots of white hair. Anyways, he certainly looks healthier and younger than 58 year old, 250 pills-a-day taker young forever-wannabe Ray Kurzweil.



Posted Image


I think Sting looks about the same age as Paul (Author of “The CR Way“), yet you said he looked so young in another thread. Are you biased when it comes to people on CR?




Hm no i'm not biased. I do think Paul looks young, but my impression may have been because of how he carried himself in the video, in that enthusiastic way. Maybe if i saw a picture of him only i'd think he looked older than my impression with the video.

In picture only, paul would very likely look older than sting.

#74 VictorBjoerk

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Posted 07 October 2008 - 11:34 PM

John Robbins is 62, I think.. Very fit but looks his age.. Just to give an example of someone eho has taken care of himself through diet and exercise a lot.




http://www.healthyat100.org/

#75 Korimyr the Rat

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Posted 07 December 2008 - 04:04 AM

If I maintain a healthy physique, then the physical appearance of aging is nothing more than a few wrinkles and more grey in the hair I already shave off.

I see no cause to waste my time and money-- or to put my health in danger-- over such trivialities.

#76 Ventipulmin

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Posted 07 December 2008 - 05:45 AM

Straight Answer - Yes, I would.

I have not yet, though.

#77 kismet

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Posted 07 December 2008 - 08:07 PM

If I maintain a healthy physique, then the physical appearance of aging is nothing more than a few wrinkles and more grey in the hair I already shave off.

I see no cause to waste my time and money-- or to put my health in danger-- over such trivialities.

You underestimate the power of good looks.
As a matter of fact good looking people have it easier in life, earning money, acquiring power, finding a good looking partner.  If you are more successful it will make you either happier directly, give you more freedom and opportunities to find happiness or if you are an altruist you can simply donate more money (e.g. SENS).
If you want to convince people about "life extension" or "transhumanism" your appearance will speak louder than your words. People who do not only seem to talk the talk, but really (seem!) to walk the walk, are much more credible.
It could make you feel better and more confident, not only if you're insecure, but it will work as a self-prescribed placebo. If you look younger, it's easier to feel younger.
Botox & co does not only mask aging damage, it actually prevents intrinsic aging to some degree...
There's also the transhumanist side of tweaking your appearence.

#78 mustardseed41

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Posted 09 December 2008 - 04:06 AM

Seems Nancy Pelosi has had some recent plastic surgery.

http://politicalhumo...losiniptuck.htm

Edited by mustardseed41, 09 December 2008 - 04:06 AM.


#79 Natascha

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Posted 14 December 2008 - 02:31 PM

Yes, I would. I'm 27 so I'm not worried about it at the moment but when I hit my 50s or 60s I would get something done if I was aging badly. A full face lift is creepy to me but I think things like that would be obsolete by then.

#80 Matt

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Posted 20 December 2008 - 11:58 PM

One thing that always stands out when I see people is big puffy eye bags. If I constantly had these I would get it sorted definitely because It's something that I think makes someone looks so much older, even if the rest of their skin is in good condition. I am considering at some point gettnig rid of a small dark vein under my right eye which I developed quite shortly after I took cipro (it's a common thing 'floxed' people share).

Edited by Matt, 21 December 2008 - 12:01 AM.


#81 Forever21

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Posted 21 December 2008 - 05:32 AM

I've read about filler/fat injections in this forum to regain that youthful facial look. I'm wondering if that's safe.

Edited by Forever21, 21 December 2008 - 05:32 AM.


#82 Ben

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Posted 21 December 2008 - 01:56 PM

One thing that always stands out when I see people is big puffy eye bags. If I constantly had these I would get it sorted definitely because It's something that I think makes someone looks so much older, even if the rest of their skin is in good condition. I am considering at some point gettnig rid of a small dark vein under my right eye which I developed quite shortly after I took cipro (it's a common thing 'floxed' people share).


Ah! I know what you mean. I have one just under my right eye. Very irritating. I think you can get it lasered.

#83 Hagazussa

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Posted 02 July 2009 - 09:35 PM

I know that there are a lot of members here that would not hesitate to get body mods to make them function better but would you get a body mod to make you look better.

Would you consider cosmetic surgery? What about botox or a laser peel? Perhaps you have already had cosmetic surgery.

Vote and discuss people


I am skeptical to botox, I would not want to pump poison into my body. But I look at it this way, my looks is a big part of how others treat me, as long as I look young others treat me young and then I feel young and stay young. Hell yes, if in some years if I have not found a way to stop aging by then and things start to sag and I have the money I would not hesitate to get cosmetic surgery. And what is wrong with it anyway. I think society have to choose, all day we are pumped full of the idea that beauty matters, beauty is good through about every media, but then we are told we are bad if we take matters into our own hands and buy ourself prettier. I mean either apperance matters and then doing cosmetic surgery should only be seen as positive, or beauty do not matter and they need to stop declaring that it do at every corner. Talk about mixed signals.

#84 chris w

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Posted 17 April 2010 - 06:16 PM

As for today state of the art in cosmetic surgery, I would say no, because I feel like it is pretty much a one way street and at the end you hit the wall anyway - looking neither good nor bad, just kinda not from this planet. But I am sure that a hundred years from now mantaninig your desired look will be as easy and as common as taking a shower is today. The reason why I don't really opt for plastic surgery right now is because I see no point in putting so much effort into my looks, if I am going to be dead in a couple of decades ( which I hope I will not of course ), I mean, what's the use if all you get is ending up one damn handsome corpse, right ;) ? Actually I have started doing facial exercises about a year ago, but since I am 25 it is hard to tell if they are any good so far, and from what I see in the forum, the opinion on working out your face is split. We will just see who's pretty in the end, buahaha

#85 mustardseed41

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Posted 18 April 2010 - 12:49 PM

The reason why I don't really opt for plastic surgery right now is because I see no point in putting so much effort into my looks, if I am going to be dead in a couple of decades ( which I hope I will not of course ), I mean, what's the use if all you get is ending up one damn handsome corpse, right

;)

Then what's the use of being on this forum?

#86 infinityXme

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Posted 04 November 2010 - 03:12 PM

The reason why I don't really opt for plastic surgery right now is because I see no point in putting so much effort into my looks, if I am going to be dead in a couple of decades ( which I hope I will not of course ), I mean, what's the use if all you get is ending up one damn handsome corpse, right


I'd do it for the quality of my life right now. I've had a couple of very minor cosmetic procedures and a major one. The minor ones worked out great. The major one did not. I'd definitely go for cosmetic surgery as a solution to anti aging if all the physicians who practiced it were reputable and ethical. Sometimes, even when you do your homework you can end up with a botched job that requires a fortune to repair. In such a case, it's better not to have a procedure than to have one that makes you look worse.

#87 JBForrester

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Posted 28 February 2013 - 05:19 PM

I voted NO but would consider Botox.
And this is why cosm. surgery won't help:

You can achieve success surgically but only to a point because, even after surgery, the skin still looks lackluster. "You can get rid of a turkey gobbler" says Dr. Brown, "and take out bags, but surgery cannot give you the succulent soft skin you had in your twenties."

So I stay with Retin-A and a good SunScreen every day Posted Image



I hear this is due to the lack of fat, however. The fat provides the ceramide protection in the skin. I was recently reading a blog post about this:

http://nononsensebea...beautiful-skin/

If you look at all the positive reviews on Elizabeth Arden's Ceramide capsules, plus a few photos, it's quite impressive. I'm convinced enough to try it out. I had a sample radio frequency facial (which melts fat) when I was 23 - it ruined my skin's youthful glow - most likely because the fat was decreased. I think Ceramide creams/serums are my last skin care option before I resort to fat injections.

http://reviews.macys...ews/reviews.htm

#88 JBForrester

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Posted 28 February 2013 - 05:27 PM

When I'm 28 or 29 I'm considering getting an "early maintenance" face-lift/fat grafting (if I save up enough). It would be done by one of the most sought out doctors in the world. Basically, the earlier you get a facelift, the longer it will last, and, if done correctly, will look much better than if you did it at a later age. You can see this with women in Asia. Mainly, the reason why most doctors here don't encourage early facelifts is because many of them don't have the technique or skills sharp enough to take such risks on younger patients.

#89 JBForrester

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Posted 28 February 2013 - 05:31 PM

I've read about filler/fat injections in this forum to regain that youthful facial look. I'm wondering if that's safe.



I've tried filler. In my opinion, all it does is make the face look longer or different. Skin naturally stretches, and so putting filler in is like putting water in a balloon. Go to an injector who has had filler. Most just look weird.
Fat is a little different, in the sense that at least it helps with the skin barrier function, which is one of the key components to youthful skin in my opinion.

#90 Mind

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Posted 19 May 2013 - 06:12 PM

Someone who has gone to great lengths to improve her looks - interview soon.




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