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Do you look YOUNGER ?


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#1 FedAce

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Posted 07 March 2009 - 06:44 AM


I have only been taking Resvaratrol for about 6 weeks now. but now i have couple of people telling me that i look younger. They have no idea i am taking this medication. Has this happen to you ? and does younger girls think you are younger than you really are ?

#2 caston

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Posted 07 March 2009 - 09:05 AM

Lucky you. Btw do you really look younger or now that your taking res your putting more subconscious effort into prompting people to tell you that you look younger?

IMO tell the women that they look younger than their age. It's a sure fire way to make them want to sleep with you.

Click HERE to rent this advertising spot to support LongeCity (this will replace the google ad above).

#3 2tender

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Posted 08 March 2009 - 11:39 PM

After taking Res. for exactly 6 wks, I have noticed less prominent wrinkles and smoother facial skin. No one has told me I look younger, but I do feel less fatigue and when I wake up I feel better than usual. This could all be placebo though.

#4 FedAce

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Posted 11 March 2009 - 03:20 PM

After taking Res. for exactly 6 wks, I have noticed less prominent wrinkles and smoother facial skin. No one has told me I look younger, but I do feel less fatigue and when I wake up I feel better than usual. This could all be placebo though.



That is nice to hear. According to researchers, this drug not only prolongs the life span but also has age reversing effects on the physiology. Now this can mean alot of things. We will have to see what the studies say. but it will be interesting to see if this effect is permanent or if it rapidly declines if you stop taking the drug. ?

#5 maxwatt

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Posted 11 March 2009 - 03:39 PM

I was told I was looking younger by two ladies I was having dinner with. (In addition to taking resveratrol for two years, I've been using a home-made resveratrol skin lotion for the past few months.) I asked them in what way, and they finally decided it must have been my haircut. ;)

#6 FedAce

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Posted 11 March 2009 - 05:57 PM

I was told I was looking younger by two ladies I was having dinner with. (In addition to taking resveratrol for two years, I've been using a home-made resveratrol skin lotion for the past few months.) I asked them in what way, and they finally decided it must have been my haircut. ;)



What do you think about the claims by some company ads showing pictures that their Resveratrol cream and pills will make you look 10-20 years younger. and they even show you some illustration. wonder if there is some truth to this ??

#7 .fonclea.

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Posted 11 March 2009 - 07:39 PM

Nothing with medication but i am quite fit for a 28 years old girl that help.
Once or twice depending on what i am wearing, people give me my age or youger.

I met once a guy who thought i was 24 like him and i thought he was older than me ;)
It's all a question of attitude, gesture and voice, sometime you don't notice the wrinkles.

Edited by .fonclea., 11 March 2009 - 07:40 PM.


#8 bluemoon

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Posted 11 March 2009 - 11:47 PM

I met once a guy who thought i was 24 like him and i thought he was older than me ;)


When I was studying with a large group at 28 (most were over 24 years old), the 21 year old was stunned when I told him I definately wasn't the youngest -- he was. People have usually assumed I'm at least 5 years younger, and I doubt resveratrol (I use Longevinex) helps me much in that way. Yet as I wrote, my skin clearly felt smoother after about 6 months. I notice mostly on my arms, legs and back, not face.

#9 suspire

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Posted 12 March 2009 - 12:58 AM

I've been taking rsv for the last year+. I'm 34. The few grey hairs I had did not disappear, nor did any other signs of aging.

However, I recently shaved my beard. In the last two weeks, I've been told I look younger.

It might be the rsv, but I have a sneaky suspicion it is the lack of facial hair!

#10 FedAce

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Posted 12 March 2009 - 06:21 AM

I've been taking rsv for the last year+. I'm 34. The few grey hairs I had did not disappear, nor did any other signs of aging.

However, I recently shaved my beard. In the last two weeks, I've been told I look younger.

It might be the rsv, but I have a sneaky suspicion it is the lack of facial hair!



So does this mean that Resveratrol Is NOT a fountain of Youth afterall ?????

#11 suspire

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Posted 12 March 2009 - 03:13 PM

I've been taking rsv for the last year+. I'm 34. The few grey hairs I had did not disappear, nor did any other signs of aging.

However, I recently shaved my beard. In the last two weeks, I've been told I look younger.

It might be the rsv, but I have a sneaky suspicion it is the lack of facial hair!



So does this mean that Resveratrol Is NOT a fountain of Youth afterall ?????


Not that I've seen. I've heard of so many wondrous effects attributed to rsv on these boards, but with probably close to 18 months on it, I've not experienced a single one of said effects. It is important to note I've also not felt any of the supposed side effects, either. And I've tried a number of separate, high quality brands of rsv. Then again, I never seem to feel the effects/show the effects of most any supplement I take.

I take rsv, along with the other supplements I do take, for potential subtle positives, not because I expect any of the supposed fountain of youth effects I keep hearing others talk about. Personally, I think most of it is placebo effect, with a few rare exceptions. Still, more power to them.

#12 TheFountain

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Posted 12 March 2009 - 03:26 PM

I've been taking rsv for the last year+. I'm 34. The few grey hairs I had did not disappear, nor did any other signs of aging.

However, I recently shaved my beard. In the last two weeks, I've been told I look younger.

It might be the rsv, but I have a sneaky suspicion it is the lack of facial hair!



So does this mean that Resveratrol Is NOT a fountain of Youth afterall ?????


Not that I've seen. I've heard of so many wondrous effects attributed to rsv on these boards, but with probably close to 18 months on it, I've not experienced a single one of said effects. It is important to note I've also not felt any of the supposed side effects, either. And I've tried a number of separate, high quality brands of rsv. Then again, I never seem to feel the effects/show the effects of most any supplement I take.

I take rsv, along with the other supplements I do take, for potential subtle positives, not because I expect any of the supposed fountain of youth effects I keep hearing others talk about. Personally, I think most of it is placebo effect, with a few rare exceptions. Still, more power to them.


And the positive results of all the studies are made up for the purpose of enhancing the placebo effect? Funny.

#13 suspire

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Posted 12 March 2009 - 05:01 PM

I've been taking rsv for the last year+. I'm 34. The few grey hairs I had did not disappear, nor did any other signs of aging.

However, I recently shaved my beard. In the last two weeks, I've been told I look younger.

It might be the rsv, but I have a sneaky suspicion it is the lack of facial hair!



So does this mean that Resveratrol Is NOT a fountain of Youth afterall ?????


Not that I've seen. I've heard of so many wondrous effects attributed to rsv on these boards, but with probably close to 18 months on it, I've not experienced a single one of said effects. It is important to note I've also not felt any of the supposed side effects, either. And I've tried a number of separate, high quality brands of rsv. Then again, I never seem to feel the effects/show the effects of most any supplement I take.

I take rsv, along with the other supplements I do take, for potential subtle positives, not because I expect any of the supposed fountain of youth effects I keep hearing others talk about. Personally, I think most of it is placebo effect, with a few rare exceptions. Still, more power to them.


And the positive results of all the studies are made up for the purpose of enhancing the placebo effect? Funny.


No. If I thought the positive results of all the studies were placebo effect or made up for the purpose of enhancing the placebo effect, I wouldn't take rsv.

I think the studies may be valid, enough so that I am willing to take rsv. I think more studies are warranted, however.

I think the effects many posters on this forum are reporting--though not all--are placebo. Such as the: "I've been on rsv for 1 week and OMG, I think I look younger!" or the "I've been on rsv for three days and OMG, my girlfriend says I am a sex-god in the sack!!!" Or "OMG, I was just THINKING about RSV and suddenly I could fly!!!"

Rsv may also inhibit people's ability to correctly read posts; I've personally noticed this phenomenon time and again on these forums. Of course, it may just be a placebo effect!

#14 geddarkstorm

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Posted 13 March 2009 - 12:54 AM

I don't know of any basis why resveratrol would necessarily make someone look younger, or where that idea comes from other than "anti-aging" usually making people think "look young". It depends on what age you are comparing. The normal human development shouldn't be hindered by resveratrol, and that's a good thing. So, till middle age things probably will progress more or less like normal. Only aging that results from cells tiring and starting to misexpress the wrong genes (all sorts of zany trouble starts then; and this may be a conserved pathway for aging in eukaryotes) would be expected to be affected by resveratrol, and that isn't until much later on in life (at least after 55 when stem cells start to peeter out and regenerative ability begins its slow decline; which resveratrol counters in some ways; but resveratrol CANNOT counter all effects of aging, and should never be expected to). Also, it probably depends on when one starts resveratrol usage on how it affects outward appearance.

Resveratrol's major effects are under the hood. The heart, arteries, muscles, bones, genomic stability, cellular energy, etc. Nothing you are going to see (hopefully) directly with your own eyes, or feel (unless you test yourself every day to see the subtle changes build up; or if you have a major problem resveratrol can reverse, such as diabetes and other metabolic troubles, then it can be quite dramatic). The internal health effects are major and pronounced in all studies, but quantifying exactly how protected you are from a heart attack or stroke isn't something you can easily do, and it'll take decades for most people before they reach the stage where the risks get high enough that resveratrol intervention and lowering of said risks will start to become most apparent, I think.

No, the effects seen in studies are not made up in any way, shape, or form, and I feel aggrieved anyone would say that, unless it was jest, then it is pretty funny. There is never, ever, a placebo effect in a scientific study that demonstrates significant change against a paired control that IS on a placebo. That's what makes science science. There could be other variables that failed to be controlled that could muddle things, but that's it, and that's the power of controls. Anecdotal evidence is completely unregulated and a whole different matter, though.

To elaborate, there is a thing called "paired controls" in science, and which you see used extensively in the resveratrol in vivo studies. Nothing is science without controls by which to know what you are trying to experiment on is what you are actually seeing. Paired controls eliminate all variables sans the one you are manipulating (dosage amount of resveratrol usually). The results are rock solid, indisputable for the specific conditions and situations of that study, unless they cannot be replicated, which is why they are replicated several times for a study to have any meaning (one cannot have statistics without replication, so all those studies that say "statistically significant" replicated the experiment enough times to evaluate it with math). Now, doing paired controls on humans is nigh impossible, which is why we do our studies mostly in lower animals that are close enough to humans to be the same most of the time. And when we see the effects manifested over a wide range of animals, from yeast to mice, like resveratrol, then we can have very high confidence the same or similar will apply to humans. "Looking younger" isn't something I've seen in any studies ;).

Edited by geddarkstorm, 13 March 2009 - 01:26 AM.


#15 2tender

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Posted 13 March 2009 - 01:26 AM

Im in my fifties, I took Res in the early nineties and felt placebo better, I had to quit taking it because of GI and joint problems from the high emodin content. I recently found products with low emodin content and started using them, I feel more energy during my work day and seem to recover better from exercise after I added Res. to my regimen. It's not scientific, but it is placebo.

#16 geddarkstorm

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Posted 13 March 2009 - 01:30 AM

Im in my fifties, I took Res in the early nineties and felt placebo better, I had to quit taking it because of GI and joint problems from the high emodin content. I recently found products with low emodin content and started using them, I feel more energy during my work day and seem to recover better from exercise after I added Res. to my regimen. It's not scientific, but it is placebo.


Exactly. Unless you could quantitate the effects using tests, and compare to when you don't have resveratrol to when you do, using some proper control such as you don't know if the pill you are taking has resveratrol or not, but someone else does and so records the days you were on it for you, to compare to after the study is done. And even then, changes that are massive over a life time are going to be subtle on any given day.

#17 bluemoon

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Posted 15 March 2009 - 03:32 AM

Exactly. Unless you could quantitate the effects using tests, and compare to when you don't have resveratrol to when you do, using some proper control such as you don't know if the pill you are taking has resveratrol or not, but someone else does and so records the days you were on it for you, to compare to after the study is done. And even then, changes that are massive over a life time are going to be subtle on any given day.


I'm not sure why the results would have to be quantified to show a clear effect, nor why someone would even have to go off resveratrol to test. That all helps, but what if you were lifting weights and could never bench more than 150 lbs. You take a pill that is supposed to increase strength, and you start to bench 175lbs regularly. That would convince me there was something in that pill since an extra 25 lbs is impossible with just a placebo effect.

A guy wrote about his experience taking resveratrol wih anti athritis medicine, accidently stopping the latter after months and reported he could play basketball in a way that was impossible before (I presume prior to the anti arthritis pills). He added that he is a scientist and understands the placebo effect, but he knew it wasn't that and that you couldnt convince him that it wasn't the resveratrol.

I'd still be somewhat skeptical, and I'm not claiming you could write a paper with "Fred insists resveratrol is working based on his experience" yet there probably are cases where the effect is so obvious that a placeb effect couldn't explain it. My biking up a steep hill example is borderline to me. I find it very hard to believe the ease of climbing that was a placebo effect, especially since I didn't expect it, but maybe possible.

#18 eugenius

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Posted 15 March 2009 - 08:45 AM

what if you were lifting weights and could never bench more than 150 lbs. You take a pill that is supposed to increase strength, and you start to bench 175lbs regularly. That would convince me there was something in that pill since an extra 25 lbs is impossible with just a placebo effect.


No, it's not. I can bore you to death with my own placebo&co experiences. :|w

#19 hamishm00

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Posted 15 March 2009 - 09:59 AM

I think all the literature on the placebo effect would suggest that an extra 25 pounds quite within the parameters of what's possible with a full blown placebo effect.

#20 bluemoon

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Posted 15 March 2009 - 06:24 PM

I think all the literature on the placebo effect would suggest that an extra 25 pounds quite within the parameters of what's possible with a full blown placebo effect.


This is hard to believe. Like I said, assume that you could never bench more than 150.
What about the guy who claimed he could never play basketball very long, but found he could after stopping his arthritis drug while taking resveratrol?
I also know my own experience on that difficult hill. I could make it up without stopping, but it was grueling so I usually stopped halfway. After 1 week of 500mg of resverarol (Longevinex in my case) there sure seemed like exra endurance that I wasn't expecting at all.

#21 kismet

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Posted 15 March 2009 - 06:43 PM

I think all the literature on the placebo effect would suggest that an extra 25 pounds quite within the parameters of what's possible with a full blown placebo effect.


This is hard to believe. Like I said, assume that you could never bench more than 150.

I believe it, if you're talking about 1RM, but not if we're talking about X RM (=repetitions). A good 1RM is all in your brain.

#22 FedAce

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Posted 15 March 2009 - 07:45 PM

My hope was that by taking this drug, i would start looking much younger again and start dating those really hot College girls. that was my hope.... what do you think ?

#23 zorba990

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Posted 16 March 2009 - 12:49 AM

My hope was that by taking this drug, i would start looking much younger again and start dating those really hot College girls. that was my hope.... what do you think ?


LOL Be careful what you wish for...

#24 maxwatt

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Posted 16 March 2009 - 04:07 AM

My hope was that by taking this drug, i would start looking much younger again and start dating those really hot College girls. that was my hope.... what do you think ?


LOL Be careful what you wish for...


Hey Nineteen (Steely Dan)

Way back when
In sixty-seven
I was the dandy
Of gamma chi
Sweet things from boston
So young and willing
Moved down to scarsdale
Where the hell am i
Hey nineteen
No we cant dance together
No we cant talk at all
Please take me along
When you slide on down

Hey nineteen
Thats 'retha franklin
She don't remember
The queen of soul
Its hard times befallen
The sole survivors
She thinks I'm crazy
But I'm just growing old

Hey nineteen
No we got nothing in common
No we cant talk at all
Please take me along
When you slide on down

The cuervo gold
The fine columbian
Make tonight a wonderful thing

No we cant dance together
No we cant talk at all

#25 Lufega

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Posted 16 March 2009 - 06:16 AM

I've used doses from 250 mg to 5 grams and I haven't noticed anything. All except one time I mixed one cap of country life res in yogurt and got I great buzz I normally don't get from eating the yogurt by itself. Ofcourse, mixing a 50% extract tasted like crap. Never bothered to try it with the 99% stuff, don't know why. OH wait, I did mix 99% with fish oil and MCT oil but I did not notice that 'buzz".

#26 maxwatt

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Posted 16 March 2009 - 12:15 PM

I've used doses from 250 mg to 5 grams and I haven't noticed anything. All except one time I mixed one cap of country life res in yogurt and got I great buzz I normally don't get from eating the yogurt by itself. Ofcourse, mixing a 50% extract tasted like crap. Never bothered to try it with the 99% stuff, don't know why. OH wait, I did mix 99% with fish oil and MCT oil but I did not notice that 'buzz".



We think the "buzz" is due to impurities in the 50%, like physcion, emodin, anthocyanins, arsenic, or mercury....

At your age - judging by your avatar - there's probably not much to notice. You might find you are less bothered by cold.

#27 bluemoon

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Posted 16 March 2009 - 01:28 PM

I've used doses from 250 mg to 5 grams and I haven't noticed anything. All except one time I mixed one cap of country life res in yogurt and got I great buzz I normally don't get from eating the yogurt by itself. Ofcourse, mixing a 50% extract tasted like crap. Never bothered to try it with the 99% stuff, don't know why. OH wait, I did mix 99% with fish oil and MCT oil but I did not notice that 'buzz".


My friend said he felt like he was jumping out o his skin for a few hours with Longevinex at about day 6 but not again.
I took 400-500mg of Longevinex and felt as if I wasnt getting all the oxygen to my skin around day 6 or 7 - sort of hard to describe. It lasted a night and the next morning, but never again. Why wouldn't we keep feeling that strange sensation?

#28 nowayout

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Posted 16 March 2009 - 03:12 PM

It is always amusing when someone in their 20s claims to look younger. Anyone in their 20s who think that resveratrol is reversing the outward signs of aging is likely deluded. You should not have visible signs of aging in your 20s unless you have exceptionally bad genes, although you might be confusing it with something else that is going on, like weight gain, untreated hair loss, bad skin from being burnt to a crisp while tanning, or simply the natural change of features from paedomorphic to adult that often lasts well into the 20s. The majority of my friends who take care of themselves looked the same or better at 33 than they did at 23 without resveratrol.

Edited by andre, 16 March 2009 - 03:14 PM.


#29 geddarkstorm

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Posted 16 March 2009 - 10:44 PM

Ok, I will probably make a post in the next few days detailing all the effects of resveratrol, positive and anecdotally negative, precisely to help give people an idea of what to expect. So, as a minor real quick thing without the plethora of sources I'll have in the main post eventually, here we go:

Acute (possibly noticeable within an immediate to few days/few weeks time span) effect of resveratrol:

-Change in look to more "youthful" appearance couldn't happen this fast, or I find it very hard to believe it could.

-For arthritis, resveratrol greatly reduces the negative effects of arthritis in humans in vivo. This is already known, and one major reason to take resveratrol for those who have any sort of joint issues. It literally promotes healing and regeneration of joint tissue in humans as seen in vivo and ex vivo.

-For diabetes, resveratrol is sort of a "cure". Not really a cure as far as I know, as if you stop taking resveratrol its likely that diabetes will resume, but I don't know for sure. However, while on resveratrol, in humans and mice, it seems to greatly reverse diabetic/insulin insensitive phenotypes. This application of resveratrol's is being directly looked at for commercial use.

-Increased cold resistance. This is a harder one to peg. It's a real effect seen in mice, and quite pronounced. The increase in mitochondrial biogenesis means better thermoregulation, causally; though there may be other ways resveratrol causes this, none that I can think of. How long it'll take this to occur is a different issue, and it's likely a "longer term" effect not acute. But I put it here just because of my experiences.

Longer term (months to years, to life time) effects of resveratrol:

-Change in look to more "youthful" appearance is still unlikely, not impossible of course, and if it happens it happens, but if you are younger (20s-40s) it's very very unlikely (you are already young! How could you look younger? other than enhanced skin glow/health... maybe, but I have no idea if resveratrol does that in skin yet as I haven't looked). I wouldn't take resveratrol for this purpose, and other than simply slowing or preventing epidermal dysfunction and degeneration due to Sirt1 loss (which is a major deal perhaps), I don't know how it would do this.

-Reduced body weight. Resveratrol does not, by itself, consistently reduce body weight of mice on a high fat diet, but it can prevent weight gain to an extent, and makes it easier to lose weight. Part of this is due to resveratrol's anti-adipocyte nature. Still, resveratrol does a great deal to heal metabolic dysfunction caused by age, diet, and life style; so much so that mice eating the equivalent of a custard pie for every meal on just 22mg/kg of resveratrol live just as long as mice on a healthy diet. Now that is something truly amazing.

-Increased bone density/strength. Quite pronounced in mice. Doesn't mean larger bones, but tougher for sure.

-Increased artery health. Huge, massive difference seen in mice. In this aspect especially, mice on resveratrol are healthier than mice on any sort of diet, including CR. Resveratrol seems capable of stopping age related apoptosis and deterioration of arteries almost completely.

-Increased cardiac health. Resveratrol is able to prevent all age related deterioration of the mouse heart except the increased lag in repolarization (going into diastole) that happens with aging. However, all primary cardiac health parameters are comparable to young mice.

-Possible increased brain growth. There was an article on sciencedaily.com just a few days back about a recent research paper showing how AMPK activation leads to brain growth and maintenance. Inhibiting AMPK decreased rat brains by 30%. Resveratrol activates AMPK as part of the pathways it turns on. So this is a potential effect no one has looked at for resveratrol as far as I know.

-Decreased chance of neurodegeneration. Resveratrol definitely greatly decreases neurodegeneration in mice. That is, it prevents epilepsy (might even be a potential "cure" for this), ALS, MS, Parkinson's and Alzheimer's in multiple mouse and rat models for those diseases.

-Decreased chance of cancer. This is a possible one. I haven't looked through the literature in awhile to see if anyone has looked at this specifically. But since resveratrol is potent against many types of cancer, from breast cancer to colon, this effect is possible. Moreover, resveratrol protects from radiation, which of course can lead to cancer, so there for sure it can decrease the chance of cancer. Resveratrol does this via its activation of Sirt1, since Sirt1 is an obligatory first responder to double strand DNA damage, necessary for DNA repair.

-Increased muscle strength, endurance, control and coordination. The levels of resveratrol specifically needed for these effects to be extremely pronounced (i.e. literally doubled endurance capacity) in mice are around 400mg/kg. In a human, it's hard to say how much resveratrol would be chronically needed for this -- humans may be more sensitive or less, or equal. None the less, this is linked to the resveratrol induced mitochondrial biogenesis caused by Sirt1's activation of PGC-1alpha. Since a great deal of resveratrol's effects are pathed through PGC-1alpha, there is a great chance this happens even at the modest doses in humans, though of course to varying degrees depending in a dose dependent manner. None the less, this is a long term effect and should build up subtly, not something you may immediately see. Depending on how much mitochondrial biogenesis is needed, this could still be an acute affect at really high doses of resveratrol, but I have my doubts at the moment.


There are more effects of course, and as I said I'll make a huge post with references galore as a repository of all we know of resveratrol's effects so far, when I get more time. I hope this helps people.

BTW: a jumping out of the skin sensation (restlessness?) with Longevinex is likely due to the other factors in that product, like IP6. Resveratrol should not cause such effects as far as I know.

Edited by geddarkstorm, 16 March 2009 - 10:49 PM.


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#30 Saket

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Posted 17 March 2009 - 06:27 AM

Thank you for the valuable informations. Indeed helpful.

Edited by Saket, 17 March 2009 - 06:28 AM.





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