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Oxytocine


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#1 yowza

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Posted 18 June 2009 - 03:35 AM


General Info:
For those of you who are unfamiliar with what oxytocine is, check out http://www.antiaging...2z/oxytocin.htm and http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Oxytocin

It is produced by the "hypothalamus" (part of the deeper limbic structure of the human brain); the hypothalamus is known as the "neuroendocrine" control center. From the hypothalamus, this is transferred to the posterior part of the pituitary gland where it is released (other "neuropeptides", such as vasopressin, release from this same area too). From here, oxytocine can serve as either a nuerotransmitter (a "peptide" nuerotransmitter) or also a hormone (a hormone since it can circulate in the bloodstream throughout the body outside of the brain).

Expanding Market:
Well, it appears Oxytocine is starting to be sold even more on the market.

In the past couple of years, there's been body sprays and a few nasal spray products that will probably pop up while googling.

However, I don't think it has been until this past year that nasal spray preparations have been made with a significant amount of oxytocine in it. I have heard that these types of products can be found at something known as a "compounding pharmacy" (look it up, there's probably one located near you). These compounding pharmacy's formulate their own preparations but require a prescription from a naturopath to do so.

Also, very recently, it appears sublingual losenges of oxytocine have become common. I just got a flyer in the mail from antiaging-systems today stating that they just started selling Oxytocine. They're selling packs of 24 losenges at a stregnth of 5 IU per losenge for $125. This is a pretty outrageous price especially considering it's only 5IU(some people take up to 20 or 40 IU depending on the functioning of one's adrenals, which can determine how responsive you are to oxytocine) and 24 losenges.

However, I've actually called a few compounding pharmacies to check on prices and I've found a couple that offer oxytocine at a pretty cheap price. However, you'd need a presciption to do so.

Edited by yowza, 18 June 2009 - 04:07 AM.


#2 Guacamolium

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Posted 18 June 2009 - 06:04 AM

It's a great anxiety reducer. At the time (a few years ago) it was crazy expensive, but it obliterated my anxiety - sometimes to the point where I was extremely gullible. (to pranks or jokes) I also noticed that I would stand closer to people who I didn't know - sometimes making them uncomfortable. I ended up getting a fake product the next go-around, and never bought it again. Now I noticed that there are two companies making oxytocin cologne - supposedly they say it works as a pheromone and makes other people trust you. (business prospects, dating prospects, etc) Lets just say that I'm skeptical, but who knows...

Just a minor correction to the above though - it's also a hormone because it is secreted from a gland - not because it leaves the brain. Melatonin for instance is both a neurotransmitter and a hormone as well, but doesn't target receptor sites outside of the brain. It gets secreted from the Pineal gland.

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#3 Arc

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Posted 18 June 2009 - 08:13 AM

The most potent source I've found is from team life research as 40IU/mL (30mL @ $45) its very potent and looks cost effective.

I haven't had the chance to get my hands on any, but when I have the time I'll definitely get some as I've heard mixed responses regarding it.

Did you notice any other effects from it somethingtoxic? Does it just work on anxiety or is the some possible nootropic effect?

#4 Boondock

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Posted 18 June 2009 - 10:53 AM

Isn't it the case that, if you take oxytocin as a supplement, it's unable to cross the BBB?

#5 Arc

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Posted 18 June 2009 - 11:43 AM

Isn't it the case that, if you take oxytocin as a supplement, it's unable to cross the BBB?


If it comes in a nasal spray some of it gets through.

#6 yowza

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Posted 19 June 2009 - 12:18 AM

I'm wondering if the experience that somethingtoxic posted was dose dependent?

Also, I've seen the TLR source... I thought this came in powdered form meaning you'd have to know how to mix this into a solution for it to be effective thru nasal administration?

The only way oxytocin (like many peptides) crosses the BBB is thru routes other than thru the digestive tract. I'm unsure if maybe certain amounts would cross thru for those injection based brands sold on the market. However, being an injection into the body (for women undergoing labour), I'm guessing that most of the oxytocine would be used as a hormone rather than a neurotransmitter; meaning only a small amount, if any, would get to the brain?

Finding a quality nasal spray is tough. However, I've looked up some compounding pharmacies that have a dosage stregnth at 40IU (10 ml for 100 sprays; therefore 4 IU per spray) for around $50.00. Otherwise the highest dosage sublingual losenges that I've found are 40 IU losenges at $2.10 per losenge (therefore, if you ordered a month supply it would be like $63.00).

Edited by yowza, 19 June 2009 - 12:24 AM.


#7 shifter

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Posted 19 June 2009 - 04:25 AM

I used to inject 1-2ml of this to pigs that were very angry in labour (to prevent mother biting little piglets head off it nearly seemed!) or not letting down milk because she was to anxious. Really hit the spot for them hehe

Has anyone got any information regarding tolerance to this though. ie will you eventually become immune to its effects and need to take higher doses for the same results. (although I would think most users would use this 'occasionally' and not everyday to 'get by')

Does it have any other side effects which may make you think twice about it. Eg PEA with MAO-B is around $1 a dose, makes you more socialable but also raises blood pressure.

#8 yowza

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Posted 19 June 2009 - 04:25 AM

Here's some interesting reveiws on oxytocine...

http://stanford.wellsphere.com/wellpage/oxytocin-review

Here's one of the articles (there are others that are pretty interesting at the link above too):

Research on the role of oxytocin, a neuropeptide, in social cognition has generated much interest during the last few years. We have earlier written about oxytocin's role in social attachment; together with vasopressin, another neuropeptide, oxytocin is thought to be critical for linking social signals to structures in the mesolimbic part of the brain responsible for forming social attachment and pair bonding. In a study published in Nature Ernst Fehr and his group demonstrated that injecting people with a spray of oxytocin increases trust.Now, in a pretty remarkable new study published in Biological Psychiatry, German researchers show that injecting subjects with a whiff of oxytocin will also improve be ability to infer, based just on eye cues, what a person is thinking about. Here's the abstract:


Background
The ability to "read the mind" of other individuals, that is, to infer their mental state by interpreting subtle social cues, is indispensable in human social interaction. The neuropeptide oxytocin plays a central role in social approach behavior in nonhuman mammals.


Methods
In a double-blind, placebo-controlled, within-subject design, 30 healthy male volunteers were tested for their ability to infer the affective mental state of others using the Reading the Mind in the Eyes Test (RMET) after intranasal administration of 24 IU oxytocin.


Results
Oxytocin improved performance on the RMET compared with placebo. This effect was pronounced for difficult compared with easy items.


Conclusions
Our data suggest that oxytocin improves the ability to infer the mental state of others from social cues of the eye region. Oxytocin might play a role in the pathogenesis of autism spectrum disorder, which is characterized by severe social impairment.

Clearly, this suggests that oxytocin not only modulates mesolimbic brain structures. Earlier studies have implicated the fusiform face area and superior temporal sulcus in extracting social information from facial perception. May oxytocin also impact on these structures? Whatever turns out to be the case, I imagine that no politician or CEO will ever sit down at the negotiation table again without their trusty bottle of oxytocin.



I'm wondering if the benefits from the injectable are different than that of the sublingual+nasal methods of administration; it seems these last 2 may cross the Blood Brain Barrier easier at lower dosages and may have more diverse benefits with less of the hormonal impact?

Either way, some of the research seems to suggest that oxytocine (possibly in connection with vasopressin) plays a bigger role than just "trust in a bottle".

On an unrelated note:
Here's another news story that gives some detail in regards to how the release of oxytocine in the brain is connected with the types of foods that we eat.
http://www.hugthemonkey.com/2006/08/why_food_equals.html

<H3 class=entry-header>Why Food Equals Love</H3>When things go bad, people -- especially women -- often turn to food. When there's no one to cuddle, a pint of ice cream does the trick.

Comfort food really does comfort. And it does it by evoking the same physical responses that does.

Oxytocin is central to feelings of love and being loved, and it's just a central to the feeling of satisfaction that comes from a good meal.

In the brew of digestive juices that turns your burrito into energy is the digestive hormone cholecystokinin (CKK). When food reaches the small intestine, CKK sends a message to the brain. The brain, in response, secretes oxytocin, suffusing the body with the feeling of contentment. Fatty foods stimulate more CKK production, thereby making us feel more satisfied. That's why ice cream is more comforting than asparagus.

But there'd another reason why we reach for ice cream, not asparagus, when we get the blues. Our infant brains learn to associate milky food with the live and safety we feel in our mother's arms. Breast milk, rich with fat, causes the secretion of high levels of CKK and, in response, oxytocin.

Being held while we nurse conflates the physiological response to food with the feeling of being loved. In fact, when French researchers blocked the effect of CKK in newborn lambs, they lost their preference for their mothers.

Sometimes, our bodies can't really tell the difference between ice cream and a hug.


Interesting to see how the digestive system could be indirectly tied to Oxytocine production. Maybe upping your CCK level thru eating comfort foods or taking supplements that boost CCK could moderately effect Oxytocine production in an indirect manner? I doubt it could have the sort of direct benefits that can be seen thru direct administration of oxytocine though unless your body already predisposed to overproduce oxytocine... There are too many feedback mechanisms in the body for a drug like effect to occur I'm guessing?

Here's one interesting comment that someone wrote in regards to this article:

Question: Chocolate, I've heard, produces the same feelings we experience when in love. I wonder if oxytocin is involved in this.

Answer: This comes down to the difference between "in love" and "love." That is, romantic love and committed attachment. Chocolate seems to release one of the same chemcials that our brains emit in the excited, passionate early stages of a romance: the mood elevator serotonin.

Oxytocin is the neuropeptide responsible for bonding with another. While chocolate itself doesn't contain oxytocin, the fats it contains cause the stomach to signal the brain to release oxytocin.

This paper by Bryn Mawr student Kristen Coveleskie is an excellent detailing of the neurochemicals that chocolate contains and what they do.
http://serendip.brynmawr.edu/bb/neuro/neuro04/web1/kcoveleskie.html


Chocolate shares an indirect connection with Oxytocine. Hmmm... Wouldn't have guessed that. Here I always thought chocolate was said to be an aphrodisiac only due to it's PEA (a trace amine) content.

Edited by yowza, 19 June 2009 - 04:52 AM.


#9 markhurt

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Posted 18 July 2009 - 04:25 PM

The most potent source I've found is from team life research as 40IU/mL (30mL @ $45) its very potent and looks cost effective.

I haven't had the chance to get my hands on any, but when I have the time I'll definitely get some as I've heard mixed responses regarding it.

Did you notice any other effects from it somethingtoxic? Does it just work on anxiety or is the some possible nootropic effect?



Arc, when you buy it from team life research, how do you plan on taking it -- by nasal spray? And at what dosage?

#10 Lazarus Long

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Posted 18 July 2009 - 05:15 PM

I am going to weigh in here for two reasons, for review of a separate topic I coincidentally ran across this hormone for its application in an altogether different capacity many here might want to assess carefully, it is one of the two specific regulating hormones responsible for lactation. It is used in conjunction with prolactin as a part of the cocktail given M>F transsexuals to increase breast size without surgery and it is used for postpartum women having difficulty producing milk to help stimulate lactation.

BTW M>F TS's often experience a form of lactation during their hormonal treatment and I am curious if many of you have given any thought to the possibility of breast enlargement for men being a possible side effect of oxytocin?

The second issue is that blood absorption from orally ingested oxytocin appears to be pointless. Most studies demonstrated it was destroyed in the GI track within minutes. So unless you are eating it by the pound very little is getting into the blood from that method, that is why the nasal sprays and sublingual methods were developed, as well as the tried and true injectable method.

I also wonder why no one has developed a "patch" for drugs like these. Another method, if it is soluble in DMSO without breaking down chemically, might be to create a lotion designed to be absorbed subcutaneously.

#11 yowza

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Posted 18 July 2009 - 06:10 PM

I am going to weigh in here for two reasons, for review of a separate topic I coincidentally ran across this hormone for its application in an altogether different capacity many here might want to assess carefully, it is one of the two specific regulating hormones responsible for lactation. It is used in conjunction with prolactin as a part of the cocktail given M>F transsexuals to increase breast size without surgery and it is used for postpartum women having difficulty producing milk to help stimulate lactation.

BTW M>F TS's often experience a form of lactation during their hormonal treatment and I am curious if many of you have given any thought to the possibility of breast enlargement for men being a possible side effect of oxytocin?

The second issue is that blood absorption from orally ingested oxytocin appears to be pointless. Most studies demonstrated it was destroyed in the GI track within minutes. So unless you are eating it by the pound very little is getting into the blood from that method, that is why the nasal sprays and sublingual methods were developed, as well as the tried and true injectable method.

I also wonder why no one has developed a "patch" for drugs like these. Another method, if it is soluble in DMSO without breaking down chemically, might be to create a lotion designed to be absorbed subcutaneously.


I mentioned the hormone vs. nuerotransmitter effect of the oxytocin peptide in a previous post here. That is why I raised the question on if it was administered a certain way it could possibly emphasize the transmitter effect vs. the hormonal effect. This is a question that only a research specialist would know very well. However, with the internet I'm hoping someone could find an answer to this question. The key points to consider are:

-the dosage of oxytocine used in hormone therapy vs. dosage typically used for other non-hormonal purposes (note this is without the combo with prolactin). Many compounding pharmacies seem to be using it more and more for it's non-hormonal benefits. For these non-hormonal purposes, the dosage regimens seem to vary based on the the functioning of the Adrenals (part of the HPA axis which is an endocrine feedback loop), individual responsiveness, and condition your being treated for.

-method of administeration influencing the hormonal capacity vs. neurotransmitter capacity? (For some reason I'm thinking the injectable drug, which is used for hormone therapy, has the greatest potential to have a hormone role. I'm making a wild guess that direct administration to the brain would be best and it would be best to avoid any patches or injectables?)

#12 Lazarus Long

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Posted 18 July 2009 - 06:24 PM

Why don't you first identify the neurochemical interaction determining the binding sites on the molecule and its mechanism for delivering the psychological impact you are desiring. I remember there has been some study of this but it certainly requires more anyway.

My point is then you might be able to synthesize an 'analog' that is both more absorbed and able to better pass the blood brain barrier. However that would only begin the process of identifying detrimental side effects but after all this is how the pharaceuticals make the big bucks.

#13 yowza

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Posted 22 July 2009 - 01:46 AM

Why don't you first identify the neurochemical interaction determining the binding sites on the molecule and its mechanism for delivering the psychological impact you are desiring. I remember there has been some study of this but it certainly requires more anyway.

My point is then you might be able to synthesize an 'analog' that is both more absorbed and able to better pass the blood brain barrier. However that would only begin the process of identifying detrimental side effects but after all this is how the pharaceuticals make the big bucks.


I typed this response up to somebody in the past and would like to add it to this thread since it may be interestingn in regards to answering more on how these chemicals work...

There's a chapter in this book that I have ("Cognitive Enhancement Drugs" edited by J.J. Buccafisco) that gives some general insight in the chapter that starts on pg.115 on oxytocine and vasopressin...
http://books.google.com/books?id=OfFoTzKQr...lt&resnum=3

It appears both these peptides are produced by neurons within the posterior pituitary area where:

Vasopressin is released as a hormone triggered by a feedback mechanism telling the body to increase blood pressure and for the kidneys to absorb more water (anti-diuretic hormone).

Oxytocine is released as a hormone triggered by a feedback mechanism (in females) for contraction.

Here's where it gets interesting:
Vasopressin:
The nuerotransmitter effect of both peptides seem to be seperate (but sometimes connected) from the hormonal mechanism of release and action.

It appears that Vasopressin's (AVP) central nueral systems where "they and their breakdown products have nueromodulatory (possibly meaning influencing both the post-synaptic as well as pre-synaptic receptor in indirect ways) roles independent of "neurohypophysis" (whatever that means). It appears that various receptors distributed throughout the hippocampus, amygdala, and Septum are implicated in learning and memory. The 2 central pathways seem to be the AVP type 1 receptors (these "activate protein kinase C+" and increase cytosolic Ca2+). Also, there are AVP type 2 receptors (these simulate adenylate cyclase and oxytocine receptors). Also, it appears both types of receptors have a sort of nueromodulatory connection to "Acetylcholine".

AVP as well as it's analogues (that have no hormonal effect) help restore learning and memory according to various studies (specifically in rats with diabetes insipidus). The analogues (not sure if these are administerable or not) include:
AVP (4-9)-this is devoid of hormonal activity and enhances radial maze performance (tester for aquisition and work memory)

AVP (4-8)-improves concept learning (win-stay and loose shift) in rats with hippocampal lesion (not in rats with PFC lesions)

NC-1900-enhances place learning in rats with "Cyclohexamide" caused hippocampus lesions

Overall, this seems to mean that AVP and it's analogues seem to counteract with lesions (chemically or physically induced) and be seperate from the hormonal (pressor) actions of AVP. Also, tt's effect on learning and memory could account for some companies like Antiaging Systems marketing the product for post-traumatic amnesia among other things.
I'm not sure to what extent the analogues mentioned above target AVP 2 receptors or not (the effects cited in the 2 senteces above seem to be mainly tied to AVP 1 receptors but I'm not sure); if they do judging by what's mentioned above, they could effect oxytocine receptors as well.

Oxy
Based on what I've read on oxytocine, it appears that it's transmitter effect impairs memory retention in inhibitory avoidance (in contrast to AVP), which happens as a result of modulating the acetylcholine system (AVP appears to increase memory retention in inhibitory avoidance thru modulating the acetylcholine system so there appears to be a sort of oppisite effect at least in this regard).

While Oxytocine may impair memory retention in inhibitory avoidance, it appears that oxytocine increases the acquisition and consolidation phase of memory, which accounts for the increase in "social memory". Vasopressin does this as well but just thru different pathways.

It appears that both Vasopressin and Oxytocine act via fast nueral pathways (due to both peptides having a dual role as both a hormone and a nuerotransmitter) by "altering the permeability of pre+post ion channels. Both these peptides can also have release mechanisms (tied to transmitter) that are seperate from the hormonal release mechanisms.

However, the hormonal action of oxytocine seems to still be tied pretty strongly to it's nuerotransmitter action. For instance, I read that females seem to have increased spatial memory during periods of lactation or pregnancy when more oxytocine is released, which leads to a "MAP kinase cascade"+CREB phosphorylation that leads overtime to increased hippocampus plasticity and LTP (this supposedly helps mothers remember where their offspring is and accounts for increased social memory). This neurological effect is mainly due to oxytocine acting as a modulator and not due to inducing a specific receptor expression. This has lead many researchers into trying to develop therapies to induce oxytocine in the brain along with other seperate studies not tied to oxytocine such as how estrogen seems to have an effect on NMDA receptors.

Very interesting stuff. Hopefully, this doesn't seem to confusing. Alot of this stuff is crammed into like 2 pages of this article that I found in that book I mentioned. I'm not sure what it all means really but hopefully this is some help.

I'm thinking some of the vasopressin analogues may be worth looking into...

#14 kilgoretrout

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Posted 24 July 2009 - 07:43 PM


FYI:

http://www.antiaging...g/Oxytocin.html

Oxytocin
24x5iu Troches
Item Code: 0622Oxytocin is the hypothalamic hormone gaining great interest in its ability to stimulate sexual arousal in both men and women. Its documented effects have lead to it being called "the love hormone". Oxytocin would appear to aid erection and ejaculate in men, induce multi-orgasm in women and create feelings of bonding and attachment between partners.

NOTE: our Oxytocin is delivered in a dissolvable gel circumventing the gastrointestinal tract issues.

Can not be shipped to the EU or UK


Price: $124.99 each




This place also carries a next-generation Vassopressin nasal pump, as well as - hooray! - Cabergoline (ultra potent prolactin supressor hyper-libido enhancer), which they do ship to the US! Plus lots of other tasty-sounding advanced goodies.

#15 Declmem

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Posted 27 September 2009 - 10:46 PM

Has anyone had a chance to experiment with a brand of Oxytocin? What were your results?

The anti-aging systems one is pretty expensive as noted. Has anyone tried it, or other brands?

#16 yowza

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Posted 28 September 2009 - 02:33 AM

Has anyone had a chance to experiment with a brand of Oxytocin? What were your results?

The anti-aging systems one is pretty expensive as noted. Has anyone tried it, or other brands?


IAS is asking a ridiculously high price for relatively less potent ampoules as mentioned above.

The Wellness Pharmacy (a compounding pharmacy) and several others supposedly make this themselves. I ran across this while searching online. The Wellness Pharmacy is the cheapest place to get Oxytocin... However, they demand a prescription and seem to only give it to those with certain kinds of diagnosed conditions. The only cheaper way to do this would be to have one of these supposed "nootropic" providers that frequent this site to bulk order some and provide it at a cheap price (yeah right).

#17 Declmem

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Posted 28 September 2009 - 03:44 AM

Anyone tried this? http://teamliferesea...?products_id=95

#18 Declmem

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Posted 28 September 2009 - 06:16 PM

Anyone tried this? http://teamliferesea...?products_id=95


Actually, I guess that stuff wouldn't even work unless injected into the bloodstream, since it isn't sublingual. Right?

#19 Mortuorum

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Posted 28 September 2009 - 09:23 PM

Anyone tried this? http://teamliferesea...?products_id=95


Actually, I guess that stuff wouldn't even work unless injected into the bloodstream, since it isn't sublingual. Right?


I am extremely curious about this substance as well, I wrote to TEAM LIFE RESEARCH and made inquiries about the purity, grade, the dosage administration, modality(ies) of administration, gastrointestinal distress issues I have read about with oral Oxytocine, etc. and the only replies I received were these, which I qute here, terse, perfunctory, not addressing most of my questions at all, kind of obnoxious, really:

it is simply oxytocin at 40iu/ml 30ml in aqueous bacteriostatic solution

there is nothing more or less to be said

it is sterile

Edited by Mortuorum, 28 September 2009 - 09:24 PM.


#20 Declmem

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Posted 28 September 2009 - 09:59 PM

Anyone tried this? http://teamliferesea...?products_id=95


Actually, I guess that stuff wouldn't even work unless injected into the bloodstream, since it isn't sublingual. Right?


I am extremely curious about this substance as well, I wrote to TEAM LIFE RESEARCH and made inquiries about the purity, grade, the dosage administration, modality(ies) of administration, gastrointestinal distress issues I have read about with oral Oxytocine, etc. and the only replies I received were these, which I qute here, terse, perfunctory, not addressing most of my questions at all, kind of obnoxious, really:

it is simply oxytocin at 40iu/ml 30ml in aqueous bacteriostatic solution

there is nothing more or less to be said

it is sterile


Hey, thanks for checking with them.

I don't think they can say anything else, legally. If you look at their terms of use, they avoid legal issues by stating that they only sell the products for manufacturing/research purposes, not for consumption.

I think we'll have to get our info from a knowledgeable member here or elsewhere :p

#21 yowza

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Posted 29 September 2009 - 05:20 AM

Team Life Research sells stuff only for "research purposes". Although you can order these products for personal usage (everybody does).

The oxytocine sold on that site would be administered nasally. Oxytocine can't be administered orally unless it's a sublingual losenge (under the tongue without swallowing).

From the description the TLR guy gave, it sounds like this has already been mixed in an aqueous solution already (therefore, you wouldn't have to buy bacteriostatic water with it)

#22 Declmem

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Posted 29 September 2009 - 05:10 PM

Team Life Research sells stuff only for "research purposes". Although you can order these products for personal usage (everybody does).

The oxytocine sold on that site would be administered nasally. Oxytocine can't be administered orally unless it's a sublingual losenge (under the tongue without swallowing).

From the description the TLR guy gave, it sounds like this has already been mixed in an aqueous solution already (therefore, you wouldn't have to buy bacteriostatic water with it)


Thanks! I forgot about nasal delivery. Hell, its only $45, maybe I'll give it a shot.

#23 Declmem

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Posted 29 September 2009 - 10:09 PM

OK I tried to purchase it but apparently the only way payment is allowed is via Money Order. Fine, but the cart gave me no address or name to send the money order to. :p

I notice there is no address information on the site, and the support email I just got back didn't answer my question and was phrased oddly - leading me to believe that English is not the person's first language.

Anyone have any experience with these guys? Are their products better than their site/service?

Edited by Declmem, 29 September 2009 - 10:10 PM.


#24 Arc

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Posted 30 September 2009 - 02:34 AM

Just be careful when you mix up a intranasal spray that you don't use too much, I never got around to buying any.

But at 40IU/ml its very strong and a nasal spray should last you a long time, just make sure you refrigerate it.

It only has a half-life of 1-6 minutes in the body and doesn't normally cross the BBB. So personally I would wait until you can get your hands on an oxytocin analogue like WAY-267,464, which does cross the BBB.

#25 yowza

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Posted 01 October 2009 - 04:48 AM

I've had experience ordering from TLR. I've ordered the CXM716 from them. They'll only accept cash or money order. You need to contact the guy via e-mail first and he'll instruct you on how to order (That's how I did it).

I'd suggest going to the post office and getting a money order (you can keep the copy of this). Under whose name the money order will be sent to just simply put TLR (acronym only). Then mail it out.

Just be careful when you mix up a intranasal spray that you don't use too much, I never got around to buying any.

But at 40IU/ml its very strong and a nasal spray should last you a long time, just make sure you refrigerate it.

It only has a half-life of 1-6 minutes in the body and doesn't normally cross the BBB. So personally I would wait until you can get your hands on an oxytocin analogue like WAY-267,464, which does cross the BBB.


What's WAY-267, 464?

As you can see, I've mentioned some analogues in one of my long ass posts above. I've never heard of this though. Whose developed it and is it being run through clinical trials?

#26 k10

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Posted 20 November 2009 - 06:54 AM


FYI:

http://www.antiaging...g/Oxytocin.html

Oxytocin
24x5iu Troches
Item Code: 0622Oxytocin is the hypothalamic hormone gaining great interest in its ability to stimulate sexual arousal in both men and women. Its documented effects have lead to it being called "the love hormone". Oxytocin would appear to aid erection and ejaculate in men, induce multi-orgasm in women and create feelings of bonding and attachment between partners.

NOTE: our Oxytocin is delivered in a dissolvable gel circumventing the gastrointestinal tract issues.

Can not be shipped to the EU or UK


Price: $124.99 each




This place also carries a next-generation Vassopressin nasal pump, as well as - hooray! - Cabergoline (ultra potent prolactin supressor hyper-libido enhancer), which they do ship to the US! Plus lots of other tasty-sounding advanced goodies.


Since this is delivered through a gel, would the delivery be slower, thus lasting more than 5-10 minutes? I want to try this out. And the 'troches' are actually 24 x 20iu's not 5iu's.

Also if you buy an injectable form of oxytocin how do you prepare it for intranasal administration? DO you just put it in a spray bottle without anything else? How can you be sure of the dose? Could it be somehow mixed with something to make your own 'gel' like the one above?

#27 zorba990

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Posted 05 January 2010 - 08:03 PM

Oxytocin for um, your pets:

http://www.petnutrit...0ml-p-1388.html

#28 stephen_b

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Posted 17 February 2010 - 03:45 PM

The drugs.com page on oxytocin lists:

Maternal reactions include cardiac arrhythmias, premature ventricular contractions, hypertensive episodes; fetal or neonatal reactions include bradycardia, premature ventricular contractions, other arrhythmias

I think it's used to induce abortions, so the fetal damage would make sense. Is it a case of the dose making the poison here? The site talks about recommended IV doses 0.5 to 2 milliunits/min, and I'm unsure whether units here are IU.

#29 stephen_b

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Posted 17 February 2010 - 04:03 PM

From the Wikipedia article on oxytocin:

The tocolytic agent atosiban (Tractocile) acts as an antagonist of oxytocin receptors; this drug is registered in many countries to suppress premature labor between 24 and 33 weeks of gestation. It has fewer side-effects than drugs previously used for this purpose (ritodrine, salbutamol and terbutaline).

This should set off some bells for folks that take low dose naltrexone. A low dose of atosiban might block oxytocin receptors and lead to a rebound effect.

StephenB

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#30 russianBEAR

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Posted 19 February 2010 - 06:14 AM

As far as I know, having regular sex is the best source of said hormone...don't think there's a need to supplement it additionally then.




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