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Magnesium


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34 replies to this topic

Poll: Magnesium (55 member(s) have cast votes)

Magnesium

  1. yes (51 votes [92.73%])

    Percentage of vote: 92.73%

  2. no (4 votes [7.27%])

    Percentage of vote: 7.27%

Vote

#31 OneScrewLoose

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Posted 02 January 2010 - 01:00 PM

Magnesium is best taken at night on an empty stomach,



Because?


High absorption for lack of calcium and the sleep benefits are nice.

#32 Michael

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Posted 02 January 2010 - 04:02 PM

All:

why should [Mg] be included? Magnesium is best taken at night on an empty stomach [because of "High absorption for lack of calcium and the sleep benefits are nice"] and this would probably be taken with meals.

Actually, the effect of calcium on Mg absorption is almost negligible, except at extremely high dose:

Most human studies of effects of dietary calcium on magnesium absorption have shown no effect (Fine et al., 1991a; Hardwick et al., 1991; Spencer et al., 1978b), but one has reported decreased magnesium absorption rates (Greger et al., 1981). Perfusion of the jejunum of normal subjects with 0 to 800 mg (0 to 20 mmol) calcium had no effect on magnesium absorption (Brannan et al., 1976). Increased calcium intake did not affect magnesium balance when as much as 2,000 mg (50 mmol)/day of calcium was given to adult men (Spencer et al., 1978b, 1994), or when an additional 1,000 mg (25 mmol)/day of calcium was given to adolescents (Andon et al., 1996). Magnesium intake ranging from 241 to 826 mg (10 to 34.4 mmol)/day did not alter calcium balance at either 241 mg (10 mmol) or 812 mg (20.3 mmol)/day of calcium (Spencer et al., 1994). However, intakes of calcium in excess of 2,600 mg (65 mmol)/day have been reported to decrease magnesium balance (Greger et al., 1981; Seelig, 1993). Several studies have found that high sodium and calcium intake may result in increased renal magnesium excretion (Kesteloot and Joossens, 1990; Martinez et al., 1985; Quamme and Dirks, 1986), which may be secondary to the interrelationship of the proximal tubular reabsorption of filtered sodium, calcium, and magnesium (Quamme and Dirks, 1986). Overall, at the dietary levels recommended in this report, the interaction of magnesium with calcium is not of concern. (1)

Besides, a good portion of this market probably already knows about the benefits of supplementing magnesium, so it's not necessary.

But that's no more or less true of almost everything you'd put in a basic multi.

The most [Mg glycinate] you could include in 2 pills, and still have room for everything else, is probably 50mg of [elemental Mg from] glycinate. There's just no point in that.

Now, on that, I agree -- esp as the published evidence actually suggests that glycinate's bioavailability is no better than any other form's.

-Michael
1. Standing Committee on the Scientific Evaluation of Dietary Reference Intakes, Food and Nutrition Board, Institute of Medicine. Dietary Reference Intakes for Calcium, Phosphorus, Magnesium, Vitamin D, and Fluoride. 1997; NATIONAL ACADEMY PRESS, Washington, D.C, Page 194 ("Nutrient-Nutrient Interactions.")

#33 sentrysnipe

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Posted 02 January 2010 - 11:43 PM

Yeah glycinate is H U G E. (edit) We can probably use a combo of lysinate and glycinate but it will still be large for a puny amount. An alternative is Citrate however with a diarrhea and increased aluminum absorption side effects that come with it.

Edited by sentrysnipe, 02 January 2010 - 11:49 PM.


#34 2525

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Posted 02 March 2010 - 04:21 PM

it is important the form in which the magnezium will be added.

the form has to be the closest to how it is found in nature, in nuts and other natural plants,
and the easiest for our bodies to absurb and use.

#35 shazam

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Posted 08 March 2010 - 11:06 PM

it is important the form in which the magnezium will be added.

the form has to be the closest to how it is found in nature, in nuts and other natural plants,
and the easiest for our bodies to absurb and use.


Welcome to the supplement forum. Those 2 are not really the same thing alot of the time.

Guys, I dunno... I sorta wanna stay away from citrate because of the aluminum absorption effects, but glycinate is pretty big... how about malate or something similar?

Might be a little more expensive than citrate, but it doesn't have the aluminum absoprtion, i don't think, and it also is pretty close to AACs like the other organic acid forms. You can always take an AAC seperately.

Edited by shazam, 08 March 2010 - 11:07 PM.





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